Social Security Income Supplement for PA?

Posted on: Sat, 11/18/2000 - 5:10am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Have any Americans applied for Social Security Income Supplement for their PA child based on PA only?

Of course, the answers will not matter to me, as I am Canadian, as far as me being able to apply, but they may help other Americans in deciding whether they are eligible for this or not.

This question actually stems from some information I am trying to find for Canada, specifically Ontario.

I know that my girlfriend receives some money (she is not clear if it is federal or provincial) due to her daughter having club feet. This is the only "condition" of her receiving the money. I am attempting to find out where she is getting the money and if I would qualify for something similar.

Now, all of us deal with PA, regardless of increased income or not. Our children are fed name brand foods, get their MedicAlert bracelets, have their Epi-pens whether covered by a drug plan or not. But, is there any financial assistance in either of our countries to help people that become financially strapped by the necessities involved with PA? Do you know what I'm attempting to say, without being offensive in any way?

I'm simply interested. Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

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[This message has been edited by Cindy Spowart Cook (edited March 27, 2001).]

Posted on: Mon, 11/20/2000 - 12:58am
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Cindy,
I don't think having a peanut allergy would qualify someone for a social security benefit.
Perhaps food allergies to multiple things whereby it would be impossible, say, to eat anything but a specially prepared formula or something, then you might have a chance.

Posted on: Mon, 11/20/2000 - 1:19am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Mom2Mom, thank-you for your response.
I also, very quickly realized, that if anyone is receiving this supplement, they would be very hesitant to post it on the board for all to see, because if you are in a low-income situation, you don't need the whole board knowing about it. It's your own personal business. So, perhaps my posting, in itself, was out-of-line.
I'm Canadian, so this question did not even affect me directly. What I'm trying to figure out, and I've decided that I'll have to do this mostly off-the-board, is what assistance is there for low income families when it comes to purchasing brand name foods, MedicAlert bracelets, FAN memberships, etc.
A lot of people, if hard strapped financially will be hard pressed to purchase some items.
It will be difficult to purchase the educational videos to inform and educate our childrens' schools, buy the posters for static displays, everything that we need to educate others, than ourselves, about PA.
What resources are there out there?
I am going to try to attempt to find Canadian answers to this question and start a separate thread. I simply know that some people, when faced with even having to purchase an Epi-pen without a drug plan are faced with a big financial decision and this is based on their economic status.
Again, I did realize that probably no one would respond even if they do receive the supplement. As I told everyone on the board, I do have a girlfriend that has a child with clubfeet. The child is not disabled in any way and you cannot even notice that her feet are different. But, she does receive extra money from our government to assist her in the costs of having a child with clubfeet. I know that she does have to buy name brand, expensive sneakers for her child, rather than cheapies, but I know that I have to do the same for Jesse as he has weak ankles.
Do you know what I'm trying to get at without being offensive? If any American has information re this, perhaps they could have other Americans e-mail them to find out additional information. As far as Canadian information, I only have a little bit, but feel free to e-mail me at [email]cscook@upath.com[/email]
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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Posted on: Mon, 11/20/2000 - 3:10am
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cindy
social security benefits are not given out based on income. don't worry about insulting anyone about that.
you receive social security (which you must pay into from your income over the years in order to get by the way) based on a few criteria, death (ie, your spouse dies, a parent of a minor dies thus the minor is eligible, etc), disability (whole or partial) etc. BUt its not a form of welfare.
good luck

Posted on: Mon, 11/20/2000 - 6:16am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Mom2Mom, thank-you! You've actually given me another avenue to explore in Canada - The Canada Pension Plan which sounds very much like Social Security Income Supplement. It's so hard to figure out the differences between our two countries sometimes, for me, anyways. We have Old Age Pension, which you have to be 65+ to receive and that's it. Then we have Canada Pension Plan which encompasses basically all of the things that you have outlined under Social Security Income Supplement - money if your spouse dies, you become disabled, etc., but also money that you have paid into over the years. Great idea, thank-you! Do you know if you have any State legislated ways of helping people out? I've maybe found a provincial one - won't be sure about that for a couple of weeks and I'm fairly clear it won't simply cover PA, but it is a start.
At any rate, thanks again, and best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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Posted on: Mon, 03/26/2001 - 11:40pm
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Just thought I would bring this thread back up. I was wondering if anyone was getting any financial help for PA. You can email me at [email]jawar@texhoma.net[/email]. I figure no one has convince the govt. that pa can be costly to educate and provide your child properly with things he needs.

Posted on: Tue, 03/27/2001 - 4:29am
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Anonymous (not verified)

jawar, it was wonderful to see this thread brought up again! Actually, I think you may be onto something. Can we, as a group of PA parents, despite our different income levels, convince government that PA does increase expenditures in our household - not only on food, but other things as I mentioned above.
Is there something that we could do, as a group, to have PA recognized as obviously club feet are recognized in my province?
Do you know what I'm trying to say?
I know that the Action part of this board, I believe is supposed to be directed towards Manufacturers, but I am wondering if we can't be pro-active re PA with the government and do something all together under the Action discussion heading. I am just really unclear as to how to word a letter to any type of government. I think we also have to be clear that there is not money available FOR SURE either in our respective province or state and then from our respective countries. Hmm, now you've got me thinking here and not altogether clearly. How could I word it to see if anyone knows if there is money available in any or all of the 50 states and however many provinces we have? Also, will PA parents/people that are not of low to middle income even care about this concern?
I actually think that they "should" and I will explain why.
Under Manufacturers' e-mails are being directed to Kellogg's re their labeling. I did have to go in and question why Kellogg's because I don't have a problem with Kellogg's in Canada. However, I still joined the campaign because I want to help my American PA parents/people feel safe with a product the same way I do.
So, despite different income levels, I do believe we could probably get everyone together and write something to our respective governments. It's almost like we need a representative from each State and Province to write to the proper people in those States (and to find out whose those people are) and then everyone in each country could write to the respective Federal leaders.
Let me get thinking about the semantics of this mission. I am not clear if it is even possible. I say that we give it a go, even if it's just you and I, jawar!
Again, you really got me thinking by bringing this thread up again, especially since the board has become more outwardly pro-active.
Many thanks and best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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[This message has been edited by Cindy Spowart Cook (edited March 27, 2001).]

Posted on: Thu, 04/05/2001 - 2:26am
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I might be opening a can of worms here.
I think this goes to the disability office of the state. What is their definition of a disability? Does it include peanut allergic children? Do they realize this can be life-threatening?
I have emailed my state 3 times to ask if they consider a life-threatening peanut allergy a disabitlity. I can't seem to get an answer NOT EVEN A RESPONSE!!!!!
No one wants to take responsibility to an answer to the question.

Posted on: Thu, 04/05/2001 - 2:49am
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Anonymous (not verified)

jawar, when you're e-mailing your State, is it one person in particular you're addressing your e-mail to? I'm wondering if you could send a "hard" copy of the e-mail in the regular mail also? The reason I'm saying this is because I can e-mail the Premiere of my province (the Nazi who is responsible for increased homelessness, poverty, food bank useage and a litany of other things) each and every day and get no response. However, if I send him a "hard" copy of the same e-mail, he will respond, if only to provide me with his same rhetoric.
I do know within my province different people that I can contact my e-mail and have them respond, but there are a lot of government officials that still prefer to be addressed by regular mail, even if they do, as in the case of my Premiere call themselves The Web Premiere! LOL!
Great for trying though! Now, someone else had brought something else up about this I think in the Low Income thread under Action.
Does the ADA consider PA a disability? Is this a Federal act? If a Federal act considers PA a disability shouldn't each State therefore have to recognize it as such also?
I am SO pleased that there is someone from the U.S. working on this because I really don't know enough about the workings of your government to be of much assistance.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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Posted on: Sun, 05/27/2001 - 1:33pm
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Hello there, Yes, I am currently applying for Social Security Disability for my daughter. It is stated that a disability is something that doesn't allow a child to do the same things as another child the same age. Well, my daughter can't eat anything without me checking it, can't go to play just any place, can't do the same activities as another child her age. So the SS department sent me the forms to apply which I am currently filling out. They also told me if I am turned down the first time, appeal, and keep appealing until I win. It sounds like it could take a long time, but they did state if I do my appeals in the correct time, they have to go back to the time I started all of it and make back payments. I won't know for several months, but will definetly keep everyone updated. I know how much this could help others.

Posted on: Sun, 05/27/2001 - 3:23pm
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Anonymous (not verified)

momof4, excellent! Please let us know how it turns out. I know that many of us are reluctant to have our children labeled "disabled" but when it comes to ensuring their safety in school (a 504 Plan in the U.S.) and possibly making their lives better in financial terms, then I believe it is a small price to pay. Also, it's not like our children themselves know that we have had them labeled by the government as such.
It was wonderful of you to re-raise this thread because I am still filling out the application to my province. The thing is, and I think I posted it elsewhere here, is that I threw the return envelope out when I was doing some clutter cleaning a few weeks ago. So this requires a call to find out where to send the form once I do get it all added up.
I know that a lot of PA parents dealing with PA may not even consider how much more money is spent because your child is PA, but believe me, if you looked at the budget that I did on my application, things DO add up.
And for some people the adding up of these things, included with additional medical care and prescriptions, especially, I believe if you live in the U.S., but not to be negated if you live in Canada, can cause stress and financial hardship.
I really think it is important for some of us to source out information to share with other PA parents that may not feel comfortable posting (because then the assumption is made that they are low income) so that they do know that there is funding available out there.
When I originally got the application for my son, it was because I had a friend receiving some money every month (she never told me the amount and couldn't even be clear as to where it came from - it was from the province) because her daughter has club feet. Well, to the best of my knowledge, her daughter's club feet are no more disabling than my son's PA.
This little girl can run, jump, and kick with the best of them. Also, there are not any extra financial requirements made of her parents because of her club feet on an almost DAILY basis, as there is with PA.
Yes, and also, about the appeal thing, definitely. Here, in Ontario, if you apply for Disability (as an adult), you are AUTOMATICALLY rejected when you submit your application the first time. In our province this is almost a way to intimidate you so that you will not follow-up further. If you're denied you simply sit back and accept that fact. NO! Appeal. Then, with Disability here you appeal and then you are again rejected. You have to appeal 3 times and it takes up to 18 months before a decision is made as to whether or not you are disabled in this province and able to receive government money to live on. This is different than the applications we are making on behalf of our children, but it sounds as though the process is very similar.
Don't be offput by a first denial. Keep appealing. Make sure you keep all of your paperwork and make the deadlines required (if any). Keep appealing. It is only natural for the government to want you to STOP your application so that you will not receive additional funding.
Please, please, let us know how this works out because I'm sure that there are many people, although they may not post their interest, that are.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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Posted on: Fri, 06/01/2001 - 4:28am
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Momof4 what kind of benefit are you looking for from Social Security? I guess when I think of SS and a young person I think of my friend who is now disabled with MS, needs assistance to walk and has little for short term memory. He has been receiving benefits since the time it was determined that he would never be able to work (contribute to society).

Posted on: Fri, 06/01/2001 - 9:30am
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I have been waiting to post this topic for a long time but have never found the right place to post it!! This seems appropriate. I am a mother of a two year old with a PA. When she was diagnosed, I had to wait two months before I could afford an epi-pen. I am a student who has no medical coverage whatsoever. This of course is a big concern in my life considering my daughters numerous allergies(eczema creams, oatmeal baths). We all know the extra expenses that go along with having an allergic child. I find myself completely frustrated by my lack of resources. One day I will be able to afford everything necessary but as of today I cannot. I would ultimately like to have a few epi-pens on hand for grandparents and for the car however it will take me a long time to save for them. In the meantime I will hope and pray that I am never without my one pen at a critical time. If anyone knows of any sort of coverage or supplement available, I would appreciate any and all advise. I would definitely like to see some sort of help in the future for people who find themselves in this type of situation. Thanks for listening.....

Posted on: Sat, 11/24/2001 - 5:31pm
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My son currently qualifies for social security, although we don't receive any cash payment due to our income being too high. In Alaska, in order to qualify for TEFRA medicaid, or waiver medicaid, your child has to meet the social security guidelines for disability. My son also has many other problems other than anaphalaxis to pn/tn/latex, which make him qualify. The allergies by themselves though, I do not know. See a new post I am doing on trying to get travel covered since my son cannot fly on Alaska Air. Have a great day!!
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Posted on: Sun, 11/25/2001 - 6:24am
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I have thought about this since becoming a member. I used to be more lax, I wasn't as informed as I am now thanks to all of you that have been there done that! If I didn't have a computer and didn't have the funds to buy books the only other alternative would be educating yourself through a public library. Alot of parents or single parents don't have the time to go to a library and do research.
Maybe the allergists have a few handouts here and there but not enough to make us understand what it takes to keep our kids safe. About the thought of any not affording epipens...I would donate to a program to provide people who can't afford them. In the Doctors office you know how the Doctor always ask if you have a Drug plan? this is so if you don't he can either provide you with samples free of a drug or perhaps a epipen.
Something should be set up for especially that purpose, we should get those epipens out to those that need but can't afford them.
Distribution at either the allergists or Doctor's office.
People can't live with 1 epipen alone, they need one for school, backpacks, home, grandparents, and any other caregiver they go to. I'd say the average person goes through 6 a year. That's a good question too, so the allergists know what is the norm for us with PA children to need.
Anyway, Good Topic Cindy, I've read alot of your questions and comments and think your doing a great job educating us new ones on issues we appreciate that you have raised.

Posted on: Sun, 11/25/2001 - 7:56am
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Ok, I probably have an unpopular opinion... I DO feel low income families should receive financial assistance for medical supplies, doctor visits, etc. in relation to PA. BUT I do NOT feel PA is a disability. I used to help individuals apply for SSA & SSI as part of my job. I do not feel PA kids are disabled, nor should they qualify for benefits for people who are disabled. I think this benefit is for people who are permanently disabled & unable to function "normally". For example, severe mental illness, physical disabilities from accidents/disease, congenital birth defects, etc. Alchoholics used to be able to apply for SSI but several years ago they axed this program. Furthermore, I do not want PA ever to be considered a disability. I feel in the long run this could hurt our children in terms of jobs & opportunities. I also do not want my son to feel it limits his normal activities. I doubt with the current rules concerning SSA & SSI that an app for PA would be successful. I recently helped a girl who has MS & she is totally unable to work anymore. She not only lost her job because of MS side effects, but is not able to dress or bath herself adequately. This is what that money was intended for in my opinion. To support individuals incapable of making a living.
Let me clarify that I do believe medical assistance should be provided, which I think (not sure) this would be covered under Medicaid. They also have a new program in some states to assist families above the income levels for Medicaid but still falling through the cracks.

Posted on: Tue, 09/24/2002 - 4:57am
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Boy I feel stupid. Not really, just kicking myself in the butt. I have had the papers to fill out for SSI for not one but two of my kids. Since our 'surprise' of a heart mumur this summer, maybe I should include the thrid kid also. SSI is a pain. My son is almost 17 and has very serious heart problems and we have never gotten SSI for him. This is something that you really need to fight for. You will be turned down the first round, I have been told. I need to dig out the papers and start filing away! Dd now gets respite care so I think that should help us.

Posted on: Tue, 09/24/2002 - 6:27am
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Now.............I'll have to say, I make a mean living. (Pretty Good). At least seeing that I am a woman, a mother of two kids, and living in suburban America. (Ya know I AM SO KIDDING ABOUT THE "WOMAN" COMMENT!!!) maybe it's too early for me to joke on this site yet? But that being said, I have to admit it is expensive for parents (even with good insurance) to provide what allergic and asthmatic kids need. More doctor visits, respiratory infections, meds, supplies, and oh, the countless hours researching the topics and educating those around you. Shopping takes 3 times as long. I can't buy just any brand of soap. Unless, of course, I want to sit up at night with an itchy kid and a 50 dollar 2 oz tube of Elocon cream for the excema (sp). But, even if funds were available, I probably wouldn't pursue it since I can manage without it. Besides, I'll bet the paperwork and certifications wouldn't be cost effective in the end. (Red tape). Heck, I can't even get the school to listen to me where basic measures regarding a PA are concerned.

Posted on: Sat, 10/05/2002 - 6:43am
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If anyone knows of any fiancial help i can receive pleas let me know my husband has a good job after beeing out of work after sept 11 but the catsup game is still going on and iam trying to get all i can for little virginia right now the kids donot have health insc. the stoped there medacade as of sept 30 trying to work it out with kid care and medicade thanks synthia excuse my spelling i have three kids 31/2 y o twins and a 6 1/2 y o

Posted on: Sat, 08/30/2003 - 12:26pm
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First, I apologize in advance for what is almost certain to be interpreted as an offensive post: I live in Alabama, USA. I've had PA since I was 1 1/2, I am now almost 32. My parents were not, by any means, rich growing up, and I am the youngest of 4 kids. I am employed as a paralegal for a local law firm as well, just for background info. Why, unless it is the direst of circumstances, would one need financial assistance for PA outside of purchasing an Epi (and/or asthma medication)? Unless you have your child on Zolaire (sp?), the monthly allergy shots which are supposed to prevent the hidden peanut factor up to consumption of 6 peanuts, what health care is there (excluding, of course, asthma treatment)? If the child doesn't suffer asthma, then how often do you go to the allergist? And, to my knowledge (and, I am NOT an attorney) I understand SSI does not consider PA a disability...

Posted on: Sat, 08/30/2003 - 2:45pm
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Living in Alabama probably helps. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
We lived in a southern state in the early part of our marriage (DH in grad school), and the cost of living was incredibly low, particularly in terms of housing. Our 20 year mortgage, on a brand new 3 bed, 2 bath house on an acre of land was $434 monthly. It was a pretty little house, pleasant neighborhood. (My mom was worried that we'd be in a tarpaper shack when she heard we'd purchased a $61K home!)
Now, we live in a western state where housing has absolutely skyrocketed -- our present house would sell for $80K more than we paid for it just three years ago, if we put it on the market today. "Starter" homes in our area are in the low to mid two hundreds, and are placed eight to an acre!
Grocery stores in the south and southwest (again, my experience there is 6 years old) tripled and even quadrupled coupons. I often left the store with four full bags of groceries (cheese, rice, milk, juice, yogurt, canned veggies -- not strictly junk food) for $10-12.
The cost of living was just plain easier to deal with.
Life also takes on new financial dimensions when you start a family. We are very levelheaded parents, financially -- but there are a surprising number of "start up" costs involved! Multiply things like haircuts, and shoes by "x" family members, add school costs, and clothing, and groceries...it really can add up.
I was a single working adult for five years before marrying, and I just about lived on air when it pleased me. My clothes were fairly expensive (I'd rather get two nice pieces than a dozen trendy ones) but they lasted forever. Same with shoes. Well, my beloved has never met a pair of shoes he couldn't wear out in record time, nor a pair of pants or shirt that wouldn't rip or stain or tear. It was quite a shock at first to my frugal soul. (And now my DS shows every indication of living as "enthusiastically" (read hard on clothes) as his daddy!)
When, as a newlywed, I found out that DH would prefer not to have spaghetti for dinner EVERY night...even though it was INCREDIBLY cheap...it was not pretty, I tell you. So we planted a LARGE garden out back of our little house. 35 shoulder-high, wildly productive tomato plants for a two member household... [img]/peanut/boards/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/shocked.gif[/img] And six zucchini plants, and a host of other veggies.
We were giving stuff away by the bagful!
Now we BUY our zucchini at $1.25 lb -- again, something that probably isn't an issue in Alabama! I'm not bashing Alabama, by the way -- I just think there are things that people in the less expensive (and more garden-friendly ) areas take for granted.
Point of all this being that it would have been very challenging for us to deal with $32 dollar Epis when DH was in grad school, with a $16,000 stipend. Replacing one, if it had been left in a hot car, would have been a blow. Meeting an insurance deductible would have been a challenge, as would have been trying to pay out of pocket for a CAP RAST. We aren't coping with asthma, so I can't even add in those costs -- which I think for most families probably include at least a trip or two to the ER before it (the asthma) is under control.
Even the computer which I'm using to access PA.com only entered our lives after grad school (and has stayed there ever since -- it's almost seven years old. Still works just fine.)
We were both fortunate enough to finish school debt-free. Lots of young families are still paying off college debt when children come into the picture.
Sometimes there just isn't a lot of "extra" money in the first place. Throw something like PA into the picture, add another sibling or two, perhaps with other allergies/asthma -- you're talking special foods, extra meds, possibly private or home school, if airborne or contact reactions are a part of the picture, and public schools can't or won't accomodate.
It goes on and on.
I don't think your post is offensive -- just a bit innocent.
And mine is just...LONG.
-Sue

Posted on: Sun, 08/31/2003 - 12:38am
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If we are to start being reimbursed for medical/healthcare hardships in our lives, I will get in line. No reservations here. I've had my fair share. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img] I'm thinking a "tax credit" maybe. Don't know if one exists for such things, but the idea intrigues me.
We have a fairly comfortable lifestyle. My husband works 3 jobs. One "full time", two "part-time". ([i]Still[/i] has much "time off" if carefully managed). I work one. (I have LOTS of "time off" AND homeschool my oldest) BTW, NONE of my husbands three jobs require a college education. [i]They DO, however, require perserverence, a clean background check, and absolutely no fear of hard work.[/i]
By no means must my husband work three jobs OR do I need to work. We just see it as prudent and helping add to financial stability in a precarious world. In no way does it interfere with our relationship with out children. We often have neighbors ask "What DO you DO??? (when noticing how much family time we have together) I think part of it is we aren't in the M-F, 9-5, ---7pm if you count traffic "grind".
Anywhoo, just sharing a *personal, unique, and highly individual perspective".

Posted on: Sun, 08/31/2003 - 1:36am
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Just thought I'd share the difference almost a year in the current administration (US) makes in one's perspective. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img]
(Note my prior post to the last one I made.)
Times are a changin!

Posted on: Sun, 08/31/2003 - 1:40am
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Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear:
[b]Just thought I'd share the difference almost a year in the current administration (US) makes in one's perspective. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img]
[/b]
With regards to:
"If we are to start being reimbursed for medical/healthcare hardships in our lives, I will get in line. No reservations here."

Posted on: Fri, 12/12/2003 - 8:38am
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Have you ever consider becoming a member of Pre-Paid Legal (PPL)? They will help the members to find the right government departments, contact persons, etc., and will give you the right advice to get the information you need. PPL also will write letters on your behalf at no cost (only to members). To write a letter usually cost arund $80.00 but as a member, no charge. If you need more information, contact me at [email]tasppl@yahoo.com[/email]. TAS.

Posted on: Fri, 12/12/2003 - 9:10am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

TAS, welcome! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
I was really surprised when I got notification about this thread because I had forgotten I raised the question three years ago. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/rolleyes.gif[/img]
However, TAS, your information would also be quite welcome and *good* IMHO in the thread under TAKE ACTION re help for low-income families dealing with PA. I know that I just re-raised it within the last week to post about very specific, Ontario province, information re getting Epi-pens if you have limited or no drug coverage.
Again, welcome! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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Posted on: Sun, 12/28/2003 - 12:10pm
JRMitchell's picture
Offline
Joined: 08/30/2003 - 09:00

M'sMom:
It's been awhile since I checked this posting. I'm not quite certain what your perception is of Alabama and the "southern states". However, I would like to point out that if your 20 year mortgage was that low, you either lived here a LONG time ago or in a lower-standard housing arrangement. That being said, my view point is not innocent. My brother, having kidney failure, was on SSI. I work as a Paralegal and see ppl daily within our firm who deserve and should get SSI, and our firm helps them do so. However, having PA is not a true disability in the actual sense of the word. Those looking for monetary handouts for being peanut allergic are ridiculous. Does it make life harder? Certainly, for both the caregivers and especially the PA individual. Do I believe my government should monetarily compensate me for being PA? Absolutely not. Any intelligent individual with PA can and will learn to adapt to their surroundings and avoid contact with allergens. Parents looking for the easy way out make me sick.
-- Julie

Posted on: Sun, 12/28/2003 - 2:09pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Julie, okay, as the person who raised this thread in the first place, as a question, I don't think that anyone who posted here was looking for an easy way out when it comes to dealing with PA. I'm not even American so not even quite clear what SSI is.
However, I do post regularly in another thread I started under TAKE ACTION about help for low income families in dealing with PA and again, I don't think I'm posting for people that are looking for an easy way out.
I remember posting more than a couple of years ago about going grocery shopping on a very limited budget. The woman in front of me was able to fill her cart with "may contain" sale cookies that my children would have loved to have had (I think they were The Grinch or something like that) and an assortment of other foods that were either "may contain" or just plain not safe for my PA child. I bought what I could with my money and I certainly could not purchase as much.
However, in posting that story here on PA.com, I never heard anyone say anything to me like what you just posted. No one said, well whoa is me, Cindy. Or too bad you didn't have enough money for groceries, that's your problem.
If you look at the cost of cereal, which I'm sure you must, since you are now an adult and PA, there is a BIG difference between "safe" name brand cereals and no name cereals. My two children can consume a box of cereal within two days. Would I like to pay $2.00 or less per box? Darn straight.
But no, I have to, because of my son's *hidden* disability (and I'm sorry, I also disagree with your statement re PA not being a disability - even in America it is covered with 504 Plans in schools because of the Americans with Disabilities Act) purchase cereal that is a lot pricier.
If you visit a food bank, you will automatically hand back HALF of the food that you were allotted because PA is involved (have volunteered at the local food bank).
Your parents did what they did for you, Julie. Each and every one of us here is trying to do the very best that we can for our children. If the day came where it meant I ate nothing so that my PA son had "safe" food, then so be it.
But I don't think people should be chastized, especially if they did have the moxy to post in this thread (or the other low income thread) because they are looking for assistance of some sort.
PA does not just hit middle or high income families. It can also hit low income families.
Tell us about being PA. Share your experiences with us. Be a *true* member. But Chrikey, don't berate people in your early posts when they may simply be *exploring* an option for their family that may help them.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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Posted on: Sun, 12/28/2003 - 2:19pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Also, Julie, if I get *mass* consensus on the board that threads such as this make people sick (I can't even believe you said that so bold-faced), I will ask Chris to remove the threads. When I first thought about the low income thread under TAKE ACTION, I made sure I contacted Chris before I even started the thread to make sure it was okay. He thought that it was.
A lot of people are not going to post in the threads (this one and the one under TAKE ACTION) because people don't want to wear their income on their sleeve if it's low or considered poverty level.
But again, if I can get *mass* consensus on this board that these threads, initiated to help explore avenues for low-income PA parents/people make *most* of the members of PA.com sick, then I'll ask that they be removed.
Quite frankly, and only because you said it first, your lack of compassion is something that turns my stomach.
But again, *mass* consensus and I'll ask that these threads be removed. Personally, again, they were started to HELP people dealing with PA.
I just looked at M's Mom's post. She is paying $32.00 per Epi-pen in America. The cost per Epi-pen in Canada, as posted by arachide in her thread under Living with PA is now $92.00. To a lot of people, when you require four of them, that's a huge chunk of change if you have no prescription drug coverage. All of the information I have posted here to HELP people, I don't think it would sicken anyone, except perhaps you.
But again, get me that *mass* consensus and I'll ask Chris to remove the threads.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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Posted on: Sun, 12/28/2003 - 2:59pm
Sandra Y's picture
Offline
Joined: 08/22/2000 - 09:00

Here's what makes me sick: People judging low income families that are trying to do the right thing for their kids.
If a family thinks their child might benefit from a govt program that they are *entitled* to, then a responsible parent will do the work necessary to apply for the benefit. My parents applied for Pell grants for me and I couldn't have attended college without them. Not a lot of fun filling out the paperwork, I'm sure, but I am grateful my parents were informed enough and diligent enough to get financial aid for me.
If people don't qualify for SSI, the govt will deny the benefit. There is no harm in applying if someone thinks they might qualify.
Applying for govt benefits is not the "easy way out." The easy way out is to have enough money so you don't need to apply. I am very fortunate that I have been able to take the easy way. Anyone who has been LUCKY enough to do it the easy way shouldn't judge someone else who has to do it the hard way.

Posted on: Sun, 12/28/2003 - 3:27pm
anonymous's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Julie -
If *six years* is a LONG time, then you've got me! Our house was far from sub-standard. It was the first home built by the son of a well-respected developer -- really quite nicely done. Not huge, by McMansion standards -- just under 1400 square feet -- but a sweet little house for newlyweds. I'd move back into it in a heart beat -- pretty area, just down the road from a state park.
I will hold to my point about innocence, *with regard to the matter of affording the obvious and hidden costs of PA*, if you are not married and/or raising a family. Things change. Our insurance, and some prioritizing, mean that we aren't looking for SSI. But I would take no issue, whatsoever, with a family that was doing all it responsibly could to cope with PA, and still needed some assistance.
I need to get back to my task at hand -- I just wandered in here while taking a break from separating the wheat from the chaff. Literally. Like the beleagured Henney Penney, I bake our "safe" bread from scratch, from grain I've sorted and ground. Just one more thing I do while looking for the easy way out!!! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]
Have a happier New Year -
Sue

Posted on: Sun, 12/28/2003 - 11:31pm
Going Nuts's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/04/2001 - 09:00

If a family needs an epipen and can't afford one, why should they not get assistance? I pay $50 (American) for each epipen with my lousy pharmacy coverage. That's a whole lot of money, and for many the difference between being able to make the rent/mortgage payment, eating or not.
This is a subject very close to my heart, as my mother's monthly pharmacy bill is as much as her rent. Yes, her $650 per month rent. Simply outrageous, and it is depleting her meager savings quickly.
As for learning to adapt and avoiding peanuts, if only it were that easy. I find it hard to believe anyone who has been living with this allergy for any length of time would actually believe that. How many of our children had accidental exposures, especially soon after diagnosis? Until we can actually trust labelling, saying "just avoid it" is very, very naive.
Do you know what makes [b]me[/b] sick? People who are thoroughly lacking in compassion.
Enjoy the spirit of the holiday season.
Amy
[This message has been edited by Going Nuts (edited December 29, 2003).]

Posted on: Mon, 12/29/2003 - 12:32am
kelly01's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/19/2001 - 09:00

I am going to regret this, but...
Just wanted to make a few points:
*JRMitchell NEVER said that folks who cannot afford an Epi-Pen, OR medication should be denied help. I believe that in one of the posts it states that "outside of purchasing the Epi..."
*She mentioned that "parents that try to take the easy way out" make her "sick". Yes, a somewhat harsh statement, but I DON'T think she said "everyone that posted in this topic makes me sick". Unfortuately there are lots of folks out there (I am not talking about in this thread) that DO try to take advantage of public funds. Would I prefer more compassion? Sure, but everyone's experiences are not the same.
I guess I would also prefer that folks not jump all over people when they make an unfortunate statement. It is one thing to point it out and rebut it, but quite another to continue on and on...
Kelly
*I don't necessarily agree with the poster, just think that this is being blown WAY out of proportion. I am sure that folks will disagree with me...but that is fine.

Posted on: Mon, 12/29/2003 - 5:18am
e-mom's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/23/2000 - 09:00

Just wanted to post a few comments while I am enjoying my vacation. I saw a reference to this thread in the off topic section and wanted to check it out.
To the poster--keep in mind that you do not know the entire story of the people on this board. I don't believe that you were making a direct comment --at least I hope you were not but do remember that no one can just apply for SSI benefits just because--you must qualify first (like Sandra already stated).
Since there is not alot of background information for any particular person, I can see how someone would take a particular statement and make a general comment. It's easy to get caught up especially if she perhaps has witnessed the system being taken advantage of.
For the record, through dh's work we have the best coverage a family can get. Not bragging by any means but we have 100% of everything paid for--that means, no co-pays, no cost of prescriptions, etc.-- no nothing. We are EXTREMELY lucky and I feel very spoiled that we are blessed with this coverage as I know it will not last forever. I WISH THAT EVERYONE COULD HAVE THIS TYPE OF COVERAGE--WOULD MAKE A BETTER WORLD FOR ALL.
I would hate for ANYONE to be denied any prescription because they simply cannot afford it--especially children AND especially for an Epi-pen that could save their life.
Happy New Year everyone!!

Posted on: Mon, 12/29/2003 - 6:50am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

kelly01, since JRMitchell chose to post her comment in this thread, in particular, I can only attribute that "parents trying to take the easy way out" means PA parents and to that, I take offense. I find it offensive. I find it offensive for *good* reason. A lot of what I have posted in the low income thread in particular, has been to help PA parents of low income. So some time and effort of mine has gone into that. The thing was I checked with Chris before I even started the thread to make sure it was okay.
It is not a thread, nor is this one, that is going to get a lot of responses in it but there may be a heckuva lot of people reading and using the information to help make lives better for their PA children.
We post when there are free Epi-pen trainers available. I believe there was a thread started re free asthma meds in American (I would have to do a search under Main Discussion for that one). The information is posted here because it is needed here.
In the thread in low income, I have posted about the friend who applied for ACSD for her child in Ontario. Now, IMHO, and probably even her's, her daugher isn't "severely disabled". She runs and jumps with the best of them. But the monthly cheque she gets from the Ontario government does help this family with costs involved in having to leave a small town and drive to the city where the child's medical treatment is received, even if it's only twice a year. She does receive the cheque monthly and again, she had to prove herself to be in both the financial and the medical position to require that monthly cheque.
As far as everyone replying, I did ask for *mass* consensus. If the *mass* of PA.com is sickened by a thread that they can easily avoid or feel that someone coming here that reads or posts in that thread makes them SICK, well, then, I would ask Chris to remove the threads.
I think it takes a lot of moxy to post in this thread and the low income thread (and I don't mean the type of post I do where I put the information "out there") and for someone to come in and say something so horrible was simply inexcusable. It is difficult enough if you are struggling financially, dealing with PA, have managed to find this board, post in a thread and then find a member (albeit a young and new one) say that parents looking for an easy way out make her SICK.
None of us, in dealing with PA daily, surely even the poster herself, has found an easy way out of this. But I, for one, have found a heckuva lot of information here.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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Posted on: Mon, 12/29/2003 - 6:59am
e-mom's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/23/2000 - 09:00

Hey, Cindy--leave the thread!!
btw, is "moxy" your new word of the week? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] hehe (only trying to get you to laugh--not picking on you--because I actually like the word myself LOL)

Posted on: Mon, 12/29/2003 - 7:55am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Moxy when it comes to this thread and the other low income thread, yes, e-mom. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] You know? I don't even know how the word popped into my head except I wanted some kind of alternative to words that were popping into my head like brave, etc. and one that stood out. Haven't heard it in a long time, seems like an old-fashioned kinda word to use. Maybe it was in the Susan Hayward biography I just finished reading.
My sister e-mailed me the other day because she had sent my kids' Christmas parcel to my previous address. The re line had something about her being a spaz. I replied that I hadn't heard that word since I called her one thirty years ago! It was funny. Spaz. I truly haven't heard it in quite some time.
Oh, and I do have to correct one point I made in the above post. In the Epi-pen posting I made under Low Income about Trillium Drug Insurance and how you get that or how you qualify for that, I am speaking from experience because that's the prescription drug insurance we have with my DH as a student. Our quarterly deductible is $184.00 for our family size (4) and then you pay $2.00 per prescription after that (unless the pharmacy doesn't charge you the $2.00 which some in Ontario won't - the larger chains like Shopper's Drug Mart usually do). So, in that, I am speaking from experience.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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Posted on: Mon, 12/29/2003 - 10:22am
Sandra Y's picture
Offline
Joined: 08/22/2000 - 09:00

kelly01,
I agree with you that it's wrong for everyone (including me) to pile up against one poster. I apologize to the original poster if my response seemed overly harsh. I think I had a knee-jerk reaction to the strong language.

Posted on: Tue, 12/30/2003 - 12:00am
MommaBear's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by Alternative to Mainstream:
[b] It was funny. Spaz. I truly haven't heard it in quite some time.[/b]
One of my many "nicknames" in High School.
Quote:Originally posted by Alternative to Mainstream:
[b]Oh, and I do have to correct one point I made in the above post. In the Epi-pen posting I made under Low Income about Trillium Drug Insurance and how you get that or how you qualify for that, I am speaking from experience because that's the prescription drug insurance we have with my DH as a student. Our quarterly deductible is $184.00 for our family size (4) and then you pay $2.00 per prescription after that (unless the pharmacy doesn't charge you the $2.00 which some in Ontario won't - the larger chains like Shopper's Drug Mart usually do). So, in that, I am speaking from experience.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
[/b]
[i]Socialized Medicine doesn't cover prescriptions 100%??????[/i] SAY IT ISN'T SO.

Posted on: Tue, 12/30/2003 - 11:09am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Momma Bear, socialized medicine doesn't pay for prescription medications at all. That's why if you don't have prescription drug coverage, eye glass coverage and other types of coverage, a lot of people will get Liberty Health coverage (which IMHO is quite costly, but then again, so is paying for the prescriptions, dental coverage, etc.).
Our socialized medicine only pays for visits to the doctor, including specialists. It also covers the costs of x-rays and other tests that need to be done if the doctor orders them.
But no, that's it. Prescription drugs are not covered.
Now, as I posted in the low income thread in TAKE ACTION, if you are on the Ontario Works program (welfare) or Ontario Disability Supplement Program (disability) you receive a drug card each month. Depending on the drug store you deal with, you *might* have to pay $2.00.
The coverage that we got for our family, because we don't have any prescription drug coverage, and it's for prescription drugs only (not eye glasses or dental) is through the Ontario Ministry of Health and it's called the Trillium Drug Plan. You apply with your income tax return from the previous year and they take your family size and income and decide what deductible you should pay on your prescription medications. Our family's current deductible is $184.00 per quarter (of course, this deductible can then be used later when it comes to medical costs when doing your income tax return). With the Trillium Drug Plan (so named probably for our provincial flower), you also have to pay $2.00 per prescription depending on the pharmacy you use.
When covered, a long time ago, by Canada Post insurance, you would pay for your whole prescription and then submit it monthly or whatever to be fully reimbursed (Canada Post, at that time, 10+ years ago had a great plan).
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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Posted on: Fri, 01/02/2004 - 12:28am
MommaBear's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Question: Just because someone has a "disability", does that necessarily qualify someone for Social Security Disability?
Does the definition/qualifying characteristics of "Disability" for ADA for example, differ from the definition/qualifying characteristics of "Disability" for Social Security Disability?
Disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form.

Posted on: Fri, 01/02/2004 - 1:29am
Anne Parrish's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/06/2000 - 09:00

As I understand it, it is quite difficult to be approved for Social Security Disability Income (or whatever it is called exactly). There are many people who are injured or whatever & cannot resume their previous job but are deny disability benefits. It often requires a long legal battle &, even then, many claims are denied.
Anne
Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear:
[b]Question: Just because someone has a "disability", does that necessarily qualify someone for Social Security Disability?
Does the definition/qualifying characteristics of "Disability" for ADA for example, differ from the definition/qualifying characteristics of "Disability" for Social Security Disability?
Disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form.
[/b]

Posted on: Fri, 01/02/2004 - 9:15am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Okay, this I'm not totally sure about, so a caution in there. In Canada, in 1967, the Canada Pension Plan was started. People contribute to CPP through their earnings. It is a deduction like taxes.
I'm trying to think out loud here. I think that our Canada Pension Plan may be like your Social Security Income system, but not sure. CPP is a National program. If you become disabled, you receive a certain amount of money per month from CPP based on what you have contributed through working.
For a lot of SAHM's that were not in the work force at the time it was started (my Mom would have been one of them), you don't have any credits. But, I'm not sure if simply by living life you don't gain some credits whether or not you ever work outside of the home or not (that I would have to check).
Then, if you divorce, you can apply to split your CPP credits. Say you've earned a certain amount and paid a certain amount of CPP, and your spouse has done the same, but different incomes and contributions. He has a credit of 8, you have one of 6. You split and you each have 7.
This is important because here, in Canada, you receive CPP when you turn 65. Or, you can apply to receive it when you're 60.
I do know that my SIL receives a monthly cheque from CPP based on her psychological disability.
Independent of that, in Ontario, we have what is called the Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) whereby if you are disabled, you apply to the provincial government, through social services (the same system that runs welfare) and if you are deemed disabled, you receive monthly cheques, along with the drug card that I have mentioned in this thread.
The ODSP is extremely difficult to get. Almost everyone on first application is denied (although right now, there does seem to be a swing to putting psychiatric disorders almost immediately on the program without dispute). Then, you appeal and appeal and appeal. That's what it sounds like Anne Parrish was speaking about when it comes to Social Security.
I do believe it is the same with CPP if you apply for that saying that you are disabled.
So, I'm wondering if CPP and Social Security are similar programs? What I know right now is that should either myself or my DH die, we would receive money from CPP, I believe, to help cover the cost of a funeral (would have to check about that). Then, monthly, say he died, I would receive the survivor benefits based on the contributions that he has made through his life.
I also believe that you receive your spouse's CPP benefits when you're older and they have passed, but I'm not clear how long you receive them for. For example, as soon as you become eligible for your own CPP at either 60 or 65, you may not get your spouse's benefits. I'd have to ask my Mom.
This does raise an interesting question though. See, I have never though about applying for CPP for Jesse because he's never contributed in earnings to the program. But does he have to have? I've also never thought of applying for ODSP for Jesse because he's a child and it's basically a program where you are given money (if you will) to live on per month (and you are NOT able to work if on this program).
The CPP however, is interesting, especially if it is like Social Security Income. It is a national program.
However, what I don't know if whether or not in Canada we have anything equivalent to the Americans with Disabilities Act.
Interesting stuff. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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Posted on: Thu, 01/08/2004 - 5:45am
sport's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/01/2002 - 09:00

I think from reading these posts that Julie probably has seen people taking advantage of the system. There is a big difference in taking advantage of it and using it because you really need it. We, as teachers, see this also. We have children that there parents will buy everything (including cig.) except for what their children need at school. For some people it is just a difference in priorities. Many children will tell you they are not going to work simply because their parents don't. It is sometimes easier to sit at home---I am sure. But anyway, maybe this will blow over.

Posted on: Thu, 01/08/2004 - 6:09am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

sport, yes:-
There is a big difference in taking advantage of it and using it because you really need it.
That's the reason for this thread and the other thread under TAKE ACTION, for people to read (and even post in) that may need to use what resources are out there because not everyone is in the same position financially.
For example, when you apply for Ontario Works or the Ontario Disability Support Program, you are asked if there is a "special diet" in your home. So, the answer for us would be yes, there is, there is a "peanut allergic" child. However, no monetary concessions are made because of the special diet, it's just something that is routinely asked.
Once upon a time in Ontario, and I would have to check, but if you had a "special diet" requirement, you would have been given a monthly stipend to help with the special diet.
Our former (well twice former now) Premier Mike Harris made the unfortunate comment of saying that pregnant women on welfare were drinking and smoking their $37.00 monthly allowance (for being pregnant, special diet, the cost of vitamins, etc.) away. Welfare (Ontario Works) recipients at that time, who were pregnant, actually lost their special diet allowance. This *may* have been the time that all special diet allowances were lost. The allowance for pregnant women on welfare has now been re-instated.
I honestly don't get the feel and perhaps it's because I started both threads, that anyone who has posted in them or posted information to help other people, which I have, is out to take advantage of the system. I'm posting information that I come across in my travels (for example, that one friend who told me about Assistance for Children with Severe Disabilities and so I did the *test* case re PA) that may help people.
For example, to use another member's situation, if she lived in my province. KarenH.'s husband just finished going to school. I know that KarenH. works outside of the home and is not a SAHM. But say she didn't have any prescription drug coverage and her and her husband and son lived in Ontario. Here, they could apply for, as ANY family can that does not have prescription drug coverage through their work (so it is for working people, not people on Ontario Works) for the Trillium Drug Plan.
That is dependent on your income. You have to qualify. You have a deductible. I've posted about mine here. You have to meet certain criteria for the Ministry of Health to determine that you are eligible for this program, but it's not something to be ashamed of or to be stimatized about, it is not for people not working (i.e., on welfare). It is for people that don't have prescription drug coverage period in this province.
I think, for me, and we'll see it within the next couple of months as well, we will re-raise threads about claiming PA as a disability for income tax purposes. Again, everyone in Canada has the ability to do that, not dependent on income. What kind of tax break you get, if any, does, of course, depend on your income. So, I think for me, I've just really tried to post about stuff that I thought could help other people that are in tight financial situations (or in the case of Trillium and the SSA - see the TAKE ACTION thread, please), not even people in tight financial situations but people that are working that have no drug coverage, which is quite common nowadays.
There are always going to be people that take advantage of different programs that are offered in communities. That's life.
But hopefully the information I've posted in both of these threads will help people that need help and as far as I can see from what I've posted, you have to qualify income wise, so that means you kinda need the assistance, if any, doesn't it?
I don't currently work outside of the home but my children certainly don't think that they're growing up to NOT work. They understand why I am home. They understand that *big* people do work.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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Posted on: Thu, 01/08/2004 - 6:11am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Also, since I am a filthy smoker, feel the need to defend that as well, even though I have cut down to half a pack a day which is *good* for me. If push came to shove, I would not eat. My children would.
Still not clear why I feel defensive when I'm posting okay things. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/confused.gif[/img]
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------

Posted on: Sat, 04/10/2004 - 11:49pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Simply re-raising to compliment another thread running under Main Discussion. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------

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