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Should a school really BAN peanuts/tree nuts all together? - Peanut Allergy Information

Should a school really BAN peanuts/tree nuts all together?

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I am new to this and I dont want to sound like I am not a compassionate person. I am the mother of a 5 yr old little girl who is starting school this year. She is a very picky eater and does not eat meat at all. The majority of her protein comes from peanut butter and peanut containing products. I just received a letter from her school yesterday that ALL peanut/nut products are BANNED from school along with fresh pitted fruits, seeds (poppy, sesame & sunflower) and legumes. The reason for the ban is that one 1st grade boy has a life threatening allergy to peanuts. Although I feel bad for the little boy, and cant imagine what his mother must be going thru agonizing about the safety of her child everyday, I can help but feel that this ban is unjust for the 99.9% of the student body that is not allergic. Knowing that there is someone at this school that has PA, naturally, I would restrict the amount of these foods I would send to school with her, but I was not given that choice. I was told I must comply. I am fighting the school board and I will continue fighting til this ban is removed.

The boy in question attended the school last year without incident. they did take precautions last year with a peanut free zone and a peanut free hot lunch program. The reason the ban is in place this year is because he was afraid of the residue that was in the garbage and he was afraid to make friends because they all ate peanut butter; and while I agree that is very sad, I dont believe it is a viable reason to ennforce the ban.

My neice has a life threatening allergy to eggs. not even a year old yet my sister carries an epipen with her in case her daughter comes in contact with egg. Now it would be IMPOSSIBLE to ban everything containing egg from the school, but seeing that the school has banned all peanut/nut from the school, wouldnt they be legally responsible to ban all egg also? at what point do they decide one persons life is more valuable than the other?

Whats more, in either case, what makes the childrens parents feel they have the right to take away the foods that many children can tollerate.

Now many will cite the disability act, but if one child is in a wheelchair you put in a ramp, you dont take out the stairs. One child is allergic to bees, you dont keep everyone in at recess.

Where does it stop? I really do understand the severity of the allergy, I just dont feel it is right to deprive the other students of a food they love that is also healthy for the majority.

Please enlighten me and tell me if I am wrong.

Thank you

Lisa T

On Aug 29, 2004

No comment.

Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

On Aug 29, 2004

I'm so sorry to hear that your neice has egg allergies. My DS reacts to eggs too, we can no longer cook them in our home since he has airborne reactions.

So actually you've been exposed to food allergies for a year now with your neice having a life-threatening egg allergy.

Something to consider: At family parties do you serve egg dishes? Or do you, out of compassion for your neice, not have something that could kill her? If your daughter would only eat egg products would you tell her that her desire for a certain food outweighs the life of her cousin?

It has been a very painful experience in my life when family has put their desire for a certain food *right now* over the life of my son.

Perhaps because of that I try to accomodate all disabilities out of compassion because everyone is a member of my community. I trust the disabled and their families, doctors and teachers to decide what their accomodation needs are. Everyone deserves a compassionate family and community!

In my humble opinion, Jacqueline

On Aug 29, 2004

personally, I feel that your daughter has a right to eat foods which are safe and appetizing for her. However, peanut residue is very hard to neutralize. I think that the ban on all seeds and legumes is over the top--and I have a contact (anaphylactic) allergy to soy.

Is the PA child contact-allergic to sunflower seeds? If not, perhaps your daughter could use Sunbutter, with special permission from the principal? It's free of peanut-traces. Perhaps the school would see fit to make the soy-free version of sunbutter permissible?

I'm vegetarian and manage to be peanut and soy-free, but I'd be quite miffed if sunflower seeds or peas weren't an option--your daughter has dietary needs, too, and she needs a viable protein source to make it through the day. Without legumes, seeds, or nuts, what can you give her--quinoa? I imagine she wouldn't like that too much.

I really think you need to contact the school. Don't push for peanut butter, I really don't think that's negotiable, but finding a peanut-free spread should be a negotiable option.

It's possible that your child might have to sit at a different table. It's far easier to decontaminate *one* lunch table and one child's hands than all the tables and everyone's hands. [img]/peanut/boards/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smirk.gif[/img] I wish there were a good workaround for allergies, but there just aren't always.

ygg

On Aug 29, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by turlisa: [b] The reason for the ban is that one 1st grade boy has a life threatening allergy to peanuts. Although I feel bad for the little boy, and cant imagine what his mother must be going thru agonizing about the safety of her child everyday, I can help but feel that this ban is unjust for the 99.9% of the student body that is not allergic. [/b]

99.9? [i]Really?[/i] Source for the statistic?

On Aug 29, 2004

turlisa - you truly cannot understand this allergy until you live it every day AND NIGHT of your life. Believe me, night time is the worse for me as I lay in bed wondering if tomorrow's going to be the dreaded day.

What is protein for your daughter is poison to our children. If your daughter goes without peanut products for 5 out of the 21 meals that she eats a week, she will not die. She could possibly become interested in other foods if PB is not an option for her. If my son accidentally comes in contact with peanut products he could die.

I think I could go on and on but sometimes I get tired of having to defend myself to others on why it's so important to keep my son alive. And I'm tired now.

------------------ Lynee', mom to: Cade - PA, egg whites, seasonal Carson - NKFA, seasonal

On Aug 29, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by turlisa: [b]I am new to this and I dont want to sound like I am not a compassionate person. I am the mother of a 5 yr old little girl who is starting school this year. She is a very picky eater and does not eat meat at all. The majority of her protein comes from peanut butter and peanut containing products. I just received a letter from her school yesterday that ALL peanut/nut products are BANNED from school along with fresh pitted fruits, seeds (poppy, sesame & sunflower) and legumes. The reason for the ban is that one 1st grade boy has a life threatening allergy to peanuts. Although I feel bad for the little boy, and cant imagine what his mother must be going thru agonizing about the safety of her child everyday, I can help but feel that this ban is unjust for the 99.9% of the student body that is not allergic. Knowing that there is someone at this school that has PA, naturally, I would restrict the amount of these foods I would send to school with her, but I was not given that choice. I was told I must comply. I am fighting the school board and I will continue fighting til this ban is removed.

The boy in question attended the school last year without incident. they did take precautions last year with a peanut free zone and a peanut free hot lunch program. The reason the ban is in place this year is because he was afraid of the residue that was in the garbage and he was afraid to make friends because they all ate peanut butter; and while I agree that is very sad, I dont believe it is a viable reason to ennforce the ban.

My neice has a life threatening allergy to eggs. not even a year old yet my sister carries an epipen with her in case her daughter comes in contact with egg. Now it would be IMPOSSIBLE to ban everything containing egg from the school, but seeing that the school has banned all peanut/nut from the school, wouldnt they be legally responsible to ban all egg also? at what point do they decide one persons life is more valuable than the other?

Whats more, in either case, what makes the childrens parents feel they have the right to take away the foods that many children can tollerate.

Now many will cite the disability act, but if one child is in a wheelchair you put in a ramp, you dont take out the stairs. One child is allergic to bees, you dont keep everyone in at recess.

Where does it stop? I really do understand the severity of the allergy, I just dont feel it is right to deprive the other students of a food they love that is also healthy for the majority.

Please enlighten me and tell me if I am wrong.

Thank you

Lisa T[/b]

Hmmmmmmmmmmmmm. The school reps I met with over a week ago decided to institute a "peanut/nut free classroom" without me even asking for it. Within two days of that decision, they changed their minds. (something about no "guarantees" and a child who "only ate peanutbutter".) I did not authorize a change to the plan. I thought, "why does this child have to eat it in the classroom?" Surely there must be a point of compromise?

Anywhooooooooooo, it's written into a "plan" (the classroom restrictions), and so far, to my knowledge, it has been voluntarily violated at least once. My cubs physician letter states the need for such a zone of minimal risk.

I mean, a rep at the school informed me (in writing) that my just 9 year old, special needs son should be able to "police himself" wrt certain dangers at school.

[b]SARCASM WARNING[/b]: [i]I mean, why have crossing guards? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img][/i]

Just as a note: I have also been informed that there can be no guarantees wrt the "hot lunch" program offered by the school and my son will need to bring his own lunch. Should I cite Title II of the ADA, or just go with the program?

I also have been told my attendance on field trips will be mandatory in order for him to attend. (Remember, I'm a licensed RN and there are expectations that go hand in hand with that, even in public places.) I always intended to go with on field trips or he would not go, but just noting.

I was informed I would not be allowed to be present at holiday/educational parties his class may hold, even when food is present.

I mean, I'm not just asking for accommodations, but also making, or trying to make, them myself, in order that my child be able to attend.

Question I ask myself: "Are my cubs needs being given the same priority (at least) as others? Is there an intentional effort (by whomever) to thwart actions that may afford him the same level of safety as others while at school? Is what [i]is achievable[/i] even being done?"

There is a special education board of appeals you might find interesting to read related to the same ("Mystic Valley"). I could reraise it for you on the boards.

Anywhoooooooooooooo, again.............. My son is in a very specialized public education program for 3rd graders (not for his peanut allergy, for other needs). I guess I could request a "homebound" option (for a number of reasons) and have the program brought to my family, at our doorstep. I mean, there are literally dozens of specialists involved in it. What ya think? (This comming from someone who homeschooled for over a year and a half.)

I'm in the middle of a lupus flare due to the predicament I find myself in. It must be wonderful not have deal with such worries in addition to the ususal where children and school are concerned..........

We meet with the school [i]again[/i] tomorrow (13 individuals total invited). Wish me the best, ok?

ps........ [i]rationalizing[/i], gotta love it.

Disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form. Just relaying my own personal, highly individual, and unique situation.

[This message has been edited by MommaBear (edited August 29, 2004).]

On Aug 29, 2004

Please, just think about the message you are sending to your daughter, intentionally or otherwise. In essence, what you are saying to her is this...

Gee, it's too bad that little boy could die if he has a reaction to peanut residue, because YOU like peanut butter and it's far more important for YOU to have a food YOU like at school than it is to worry about his safety. YOUR desires are far more important than his needs. AFter all, YOU could skip peanut butter for one meal out of the three YOU eat each day, but I would never ask YOU to go without anything. If YOU like something, YOU had better believe I'll make sure YOU have it, even if another child is harmed in the process.

Your daughter likes peanut butter, and it's worth risking the life and safety of a classmate to make sure she doesn't have to go seven hours five days a week without it. Is this really the message you want to send to your child?

Please think about it.

On Aug 29, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by MommaBear: [b] 99.9? [i]Really?[/i] Source for the statistic?[/b]

Well, we are a small community and he is the only one in school with a peanut/nut allergy, what percentage would you use?

On Aug 29, 2004

Lisa, The PA child's parents are not depriving other kids of peanut butter. The parents didn't make the rule. The school made the rule, most likely after consulting with the child's doctor.

If you don't like the rule, I'd suggest you set up a meeting with the principal. Complaining about it here won't do much good.

My daughter is underweight and she loves peanut butter. Unfortunately, we can no longer have it in the house since my son is severely allergic and has experienced a life-threatening reaction.

Fortunately, your daughter can have peanut butter for breakfast and dinner, so I think she'll be able to get plenty of peanuts in her diet. Lucky you!

This might be a great opportunity to introduce her to other foods. After all, it's not good for your child to limit herself to one food. She needs a more balanced diet. This just might be the nudge she needs to broaden her horizons.

Good luck.

On Aug 29, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by turlisa: [b]I am new to this and I dont want to sound like I am not a compassionate person. I am the mother of a 5 yr old little girl who is starting school this year. She is a very picky eater and does not eat meat at all.

[/b]

Oh. the horror. (You'll have to excuse my dark side. I've been told it just part of who I am. You know, the way some people just love peanuts/can't [i]live[/i] without certain items.) [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Hey, but I completely understand such issues. I am the mother of not one, but [b]two[/b] special needs children (no complaints, very blessed, devil that you know thing), who have food [i]issues[/i]. [b]I'm a pretty particular/detail oriented gal myself and it is not limited to just food. [/b] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img]

anywhoooooooo, I'm not expecting persons to give up peanut butter or perform miracles. I mean, even tho I have. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]

I'm just asking them not to eat it in a particular location. "Holy ground/zone of minimal risk" so to speak. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

See, my two very particular, perservarative, detail oriented children, have issues regarding food that could never be done justice by labelling such food concerns [i]a preference[/i] or mere food aversion. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] However, despite numerous concerns with texture, taste, scent, [b]presence[/b]..............I have managed to raise two strapping hulks, or so I have been told for their ages.

Maybe it's just me. Maybe it's a miracle.

(*Personally* I consider my youngest and lovingly ~[b]the runt[/b]~. He is 4 years old and verging on 50 lbs. (Still not weighing as much as his older brother did at one year of age. (It was somewhere past 50 lbs.)

to quote:

[b]"The majority of her protein comes from peanut butter and peanut containing products".[/b]

Hmmmmmmmmmmmm. For both my "picky eaters", (and you may not believe what and how much they can be "picky" about) peanut products were not an option. They are both allergic. Go Figure.

Disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form. Just relaying my own personal, highly individual, and unique situation.

[This message has been edited by MommaBear (edited August 29, 2004).]

On Aug 29, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by Munchkin's Mom: [b]Please, just think about the message you are sending to your daughter, intentionally or otherwise. In essence, what you are saying to her is this...

Gee, it's too bad that little boy could die if he has a reaction to peanut residue, because YOU like peanut butter and it's far more important for YOU to have a food YOU like at school than it is to worry about his safety. YOUR desires are far more important than his needs. AFter all, YOU could skip peanut butter for one meal out of the three YOU eat each day, but I would never ask YOU to go without anything. If YOU like something, YOU had better believe I'll make sure YOU have it, even if another child is harmed in the process.

Your daughter likes peanut butter, and it's worth risking the life and safety of a classmate to make sure she doesn't have to go seven hours five days a week without it. Is this really the message you want to send to your child?

Please think about it.

[/b]

I have thought about the message I am sending to my child, and the message is "the special needs of ONE does not outweigh the needs of many. the MINORITY does not dictate the rule." and a secondary message is "stand up for what you believe in".

As for all the times at home she can eat peanut butter.. when? I cant give her peanut butter on toast for breakfast, her breath might send the allergic child into shock. what am I supposed to do, make peanut butter dinners?

You all are right, fortunately I have not had to deal with living day in and day out wondering if my child is going to die that day, but lets be reasonable here. do any of you really believe that the school will be COMPLETELY nut free?

The letter from the school stated that there would be a special area set aside for those students who were not sure if they had cross contaminated items in their lunch so that they can isolate the area. If that is the case, whats the harm in having that area set aside for those who do bring it.

Second, if the PA child believes his school is a safe area wont he then think that it is ok to let his guard down a little? and what would that do but put him in more danger. The teachers would be more complacent and may not react to the early signs of shock.. after all, it is a safe area, and I would think delaying emergency treatment would make the situation worse.

No, you say... the child wouldnt think he could let his guard down. He would be just as careful as if the school didnt have a ban? then isnt the ban really just selfishness on your part?

And lastly you all are missing my point. As a mother, your first reaction is to protect a child. I dont want any harm to come to him, however to ask me to read every lable as if it were my child with the allergy and make sure I do not send any cross contaminated items to school is not fair to me or any of the other parents. My children are my responsibility, your children are NOT.

Will the mother of a diabetic child want the whole student body to go without sugar? My neice with the life threatening allergy to egg, will the school ban all product containing eggs? at what point will the school have to say that it can no longer offer lunch because there are too many allergic children?

I know you all think I am just being inconsiderate, and thats fine, you all are thinking about the hell you and your child have had to live through. But I am not the inconsiderate one here.

On Aug 29, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by turlisa: [b] Well, we are a small community and he is the only one in school with a peanut/nut allergy, what percentage would you use?

[/b]

You know this for a fact? FERPA laws would prohibit a school from divulging the allergy status of other children without express consent of the guardians and then only with caution and only information of a certain nature.

Do you know what the incidence of Food Allergy in the general population is? Are you saying that for whatever reason your school is an exception to that statistic? [i]Do tell,[/i] since maybe whatever statistical anomoly is occurring should be investigated.........

I mean, you even mentioned your niece having a food allergy:

[b]:"My neice has a life threatening allergy to eggs. not even a year old yet my sister carries an epipen with her in case her daughter comes in contact with egg."[/b]

On Aug 29, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by turlisa: [b] I have thought about the message I am sending to my child, and the message is "the special needs of ONE does not outweigh the needs of many. the MINORITY does not dictate the rule." and a secondary message is "stand up for what you believe in".

[/b]

[i]golf clap.............[/i]

On Aug 29, 2004

I mean, as far as being "considerate/inconsiderate", and not intended as advice or recommendation, but only as a hypothetical question regarding a hypothetical outcome...............

........what would happen to the school system if every child with a life threatening food allergy was given a "homebound" option?

Anyone?

ps.......turlisa: was wondering if you had any comment on my second post...........

On Aug 29, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by turlisa: [b] My children are my responsibility, your children are NOT. [/b]

exactly why I could possibly be swayed to the "ban" camp. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img]

[b]LOL![/b]

On Aug 29, 2004

Dear Lisa,

My son has life threatening allergies to egg AND peanuts/nuts. The school he attends has asked for NO peanut or nut products to come into the school (as per my request and that of another PA parent). I have NOT requested a ban on egg products (egg salad, mayonnaise, etc). Here's why: peanut residue can live on a surface for up to six months if it is not disinfected properly. One hundred students in a school, perhaps sixty eat peanut butter for lunch, perhaps twenty-five don't wash their hands afterwards. That's twenty-five doorknobs with peanut butter residue at a minimum, what about library books, water fountain, desks, etc. How many contaminated objects in a day? That residue can KILL my son, it has nothing to do with him being afraid to make friends with peanut butter lovers.

Eggs seem to be different in that the residue has not been an issue. My son would have to actually eat an egg product for him to have a reaction. In fact, we do keep egg products in our house for our other boys. We just ensure proper cleaning and disinfecting afterwards. But our house is a peanut and nut free zone. We have the same precautions at school for egg... my son's class does wash after eating both snack and lunch to keep him safe, in case they had egg products. The desks are also sanitized twice a day.

I hope this helps you understand the difference.

Also, taken from [url="http://www.allergic-reactions.com/home/causes_food.html"]http://www.allergic-reactions.com/home/causes_food.html[/url] : For some people with food allergies, just a taste or even a touch of the foods to which they are allergic can result in any of these symptoms and can set off a chain reaction that takes only minutes to culminate in full-blown anaphylaxis: swelling of the airways, loss of blood pressure, loss of consciousness, shock, and even death.12 This can happen with their first known exposure to a food. There have even been rare cases documented in which inhalation exposure to a food has triggered an anaphylactic reaction.13 The more rapidly symptoms present themselves; the more likely the reaction is to be severe.13

On Aug 29, 2004

Another point I would like to make. You asked if we really believe that the school will be free from nuts. Our school does not ALLOW peanuts or nuts and yet we do not say we are peanut or nut FREE. I know that there are parents that will not comply, either because they are ticked off or because they do not understand labelling or whatever. That is why the staff are all trained to use the Epi-Pen. There are posters in each of ds's classrooms with his picture and the protocol in an emergency (Epi-Pen 9-1-1 etc). That is why there are pictures on the door of the school reminding other students to get an adult if they see him having trouble breathing.

However, any risk that we can avoid... we will. This is life and death here. I am sorry that it inconveniences you. Heck, it even inconveniences me but I am stuck with it. Why should it be your problem? It isn't. But thank God the school realizes that it IS their problem to protect this allergic child.

I sure hope you decide that this one child's life is worth it to comply. Isn't it? I would do it for another child. But I have watched my son near death three (or is it four or five?) times now. I wouldn't wish that on anyone.

On Aug 29, 2004

[b][i] I have thought about the message I am sending to my child, and the message is "the special needs of ONE does not outweigh the needs of many. the MINORITY does not dictate the rule." and a secondary message is "stand up for what you believe in".[/b][/i]

Ummmmmm, apples to oranges here...

The needs of one child (TO STAY ALIVE) does outweigh the needs of many (TO EAT PROTEIN).

Are those really comparable?

Btw, did you know that cheese has protein? So does yogourt. There really are other options here. I hope your school provides you a list of alternates to the common peanut butter sandwich. You might realize that you really do have choices for your daughter. And has the school requested that your daughter not have peanut butter for breakfast? Here at our school they recommend that IF your child has peanut products for breakfast... eat before you get your school clothes on, then brush your teeth, wash up and get dressed. Should be fine.

I hope you reconsider fighting the school. And I hope they stick to their guns on this one... would you allow your daughter to take a loaded gun to school? That is essentially what peanut products are for our children. We didn't ask for this...

On Aug 29, 2004

Doing the math? Looking up the stats?

On Aug 29, 2004

Cade's Mom, you posted:-

I think I could go on and on but sometimes I get tired of having to defend myself to others on why it's so important to keep my son alive. And I'm tired now.

That's why I posted "no comment". I figure I have people to educate this week in *real* life for my son to start school safely next Tuesday, and I just don't feel like going over it again here on the board.

I simply don't have the energy right now. I can feel it waning almost minute by minute right now and I need it for this week and next.

You said things very well, as have others.

Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

On Aug 29, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by turlisa: [b] As for all the times at home she can eat peanut butter.. when? I cant give her peanut butter on toast for breakfast, her breath might send the allergic child into shock.

[/b]

and let me get this straight..........[i]you think it is a better idea to send it directly to school to be consumed?[/i]

On Aug 29, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by turlisa: [b]Please enlighten me and tell me if I am wrong.

[/b]

[b]TADAAAAAA!!![/b]

On Aug 29, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by Alternative to Mainstream: [b]Cade's Mom, you posted:-

I think I could go on and on but sometimes I get tired of having to defend myself to others on why it's so important to keep my son alive. And I'm tired now.

That's why I posted "no comment". I figure I have people to educate this week in *real* life for my son to start school safely next Tuesday, and I just don't feel like going over it again here on the board.

I simply don't have the energy right now. I can feel it waning almost minute by minute right now and I need it for this week and next.

You said things very well, as have others.

[/b]

}}}, Cindy..........

On Aug 29, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by turlisa: [b] I have thought about the message I am sending to my child, and the message is "the special needs of ONE does not outweigh the needs of many. the MINORITY does not dictate the rule." [/b]

are you referring to "mob rule"?

we live in a [i]republic[/i], right?

On Aug 29, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by turlisa: [b] I dont want any harm to come to him, however to ask me to read every lable as if it were my child with the allergy and make sure I do not send any cross contaminated items to school is not fair to me or any of the other parents. [/b]

Well, here's something we can agree on. Since we parents of PA kids have enough trouble deciphering labels and keeping current on which companies label properly, I would certainly never expect anyone else to have to do it.

There have been many, many debates on this topic on this board, and I have no desire to repeat my position on it. However, I would urge you to consider this: Many of our kids are not only PA, but MFA (multiple food allergic). They have to deal with this three meals a day, not just one. Somehow, we manage to keep them well nourished in spite of these limitations, some of which are unbelievably restrictive.

BTW, there is no global ban in my son's school - I [b]personally[/b] never felt the need for one. But each case is different, and there are many, many cases where a ban is warranted.

Amy

On Aug 29, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by turlisa: [b] My children are my responsibility, your children are NOT.

[/b]

Hmmm... Didn't I once hear that it takes a village to raise a child?

On Aug 29, 2004

Thank you MommaBear!

[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] Miriam

On Aug 29, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by California Mom: [b]Thank you MommaBear!

[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] Miriam[/b]

You know what they say about hills and battles.

[i]I'm setting up camp.[/i]

On Aug 29, 2004

I never asked for my children's school to be Peanut-Free. I simply wanted a Peanut-Free zone in the cafeteria and a ban on food being consumed in any other place other than the cafeteria. I have two children that are allergic to PA & soy. My youngest has had an anaphylactic reaction to PA just from touch (cross contamination). I think all allergies should be considered each individually. For instance, if a child is allergic to strawberries, do not have them in the room with the child. Same goes for chocolate or anything else that a child may DIE from. I was ignorant about allergies until my own children had allergies but what really opens your eyes is when your precious child almost DIES because of an allergy. I view the world a lot differently now because of their allergies and I think, I am a better person because of it. I am not a person who forces my views upon another but I think a life of a person is more important than just how I feel about something.

[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

On Aug 29, 2004

turlisa,

It's truly a shame that you are missing the importance of the ban. It is to protect a human life, and is a human life not worth skipping a peanut butter sandwich?

If it were your daughter, I'm sure you'd be very grateful that the school officials were doing everything they could to keep her safe.

It's very disappointing to see that you're not more compassionate. Nobody is depriving the other children of the foods they love, they are simply asked not to eat peanut products at school. That's five out of the 21 main means, not to mention snacks. Is this little boys life not worth this to you?

I hope you'll put yourself in that little boys shoes, or his parents shoes and rethink your position.

meadow

On Aug 29, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by turlisa: [b] what am I supposed to do, make peanut butter dinners?

[/b]

I could run with this.

[i]I think I will.[/i]

************************ [b]Sarcasm warning.........[/b] ************************

I mean, if people consider it is worth risking another child's life in order to have it consumed it at school, I don't see why people wouldn't desire it for dinner in their own home as well.......

Ya know, aside from consuming peanut butter at school (or just in a classroom) being a P!$$!^& contest.

I mean, I still don't see why someone *has* to consume it in my son's [b]classroom[/b] for snack when they are not prohibited from bringing it for lunch (not in the classroom). [i] Maybe snack shouldn't be in his classroom. Maybe freeking food shouldn't be there either. But ya know, I've tried to be accommodating in celebrations, birthday's, and the workload on the staff.

Disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form. Just relaying my own personal, highly individual, and unique situation.

On Aug 29, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by NutlessMOM: [b]I never asked for my children's school to be Peanut-Free. I simply wanted a Peanut-Free zone in the cafeteria and a ban on food being consumed in any other place other than the cafeteria. [/b]

Hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm. A ban on food being consumed anywhere except the cafeteria! You mean [i]only eating food in areas designed and maintained for such[/i]. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/cool.gif[/img]

[b]Forest.........Trees[/b] Novel idea, by the way....................... [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]

On Aug 29, 2004

NutlessMOM,

by the way......did you get your request?

Or did people have *issues* with it. (People being the way they can be.)

On Aug 29, 2004

Turlisa,

First let me say, I am in the minority on this board but I agree with you. My son is anaphylactic to peanuts. I have watched him in the ER near death. He just had an immunocap test done after 7 years without an exposure and he is still off the charts. Plus he has asthma. So yes, he is highly allergic to peanuts. But he is almost 13 years old and has attended preschool and public school since he was 3. There has never been a ban at any of the schools he has attended. He sat at a peanut free table through 3rd grade and then chose to sit at the end of a table and move seats if he was uncomfortable. We have never asked the schools to ban peanuts because my son has to learn to live in the world as it is. I cannot and do not expect the world to change to accommodate his allergy. He is learning the techniques he needs in order to live a safe life without Mommy and Daddy creating a safe little bubble for him to live in. I do understand what it is like to have a child with an allergy that can kill him at any ingestion. But I also know that there are no known statistics for anyone having an anaphylactic reaction from just smelling a pb odor or someone

On Aug 29, 2004

Ok first of all I usually dont get into these "debates" if thats what you want to call them and this may seem harsh but what the heck! I am so tired of people thinking we are out to get them and there PEANUTBUTTER! My son also has an egg, fish, shellfish, and tree nut allergy just as severe as the peanut allergy and guess what....Yes his class WILL BE EGG, PEANUT, TREE NUT, FISH, and SHELLFISH FREE. Am I selfish maybe but no more than you are in thinking your pb sandwich is more important than my childs life.

You may ask how can you not have eggs? Well he is allergic to uncooked eggs or stuff like mayo. So yes that means No Mayo.

Whats really sad is that my son and my family will spend the rest of our lives fighting people like this and belive me WE WILL FIGHT ALSO!

------------------ Have A Great Day

On Aug 29, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by Mary Kay: [b] We have never asked the schools to ban peanuts because my son has to learn to live in the world as it is. I cannot and do not expect the world to change to accommodate his allergy. He is learning the techniques he needs in order to live a safe life without Mommy and Daddy creating a safe little bubble for him to live in.I do understand what it is like to have a child with an allergy that can kill him at any ingestion. [/b]

I'll create any bubbles my children *need*. And there are plenty of reputable sources and documentation to support them. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] And I won't be the least bit squeamish about it. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img] [i]It's in my job description.[/i] You would probably stand back aghast of the bubbles my parents created for me........... [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

I've seen plenty of what happens to children (and adults) when left to their own accord/without safety nets/without caution/or just $#!^ happening.

[i]Plenty[/i]. I mean, it's a hazzard of my *other* job description.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but you've posted in another thread

[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum7/HTML/001477.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum7/HTML/001477.html[/url]

that you are

[i]"on a state advisory council for the education of children with disabilities."[/i]

In IL, *my* state? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img]

Tell me, are there any openings for nurses on that council? You know, ones with special needs children? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]

On Aug 29, 2004

Hi MB [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

------------------ Have A Great Day

On Aug 29, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by Mary Kay: [b]I would like to see your letter to the editor Turlisa. There was one from an adult with a peanut allergy that I totally agreed with also.

[/b]

would you like to see one *I would write*? You know, since you state you are on a council that concerns children such as my own.................

On Aug 29, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by ALLERGYMOM: [b]Hi MB [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

[/b]

(waving wildly!!!!!)

On Aug 29, 2004

Waving back at ya [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

I would like to see your letter.

------------------ Have A Great Day

On Aug 29, 2004

Thinking of all the children and adults I've seen die needlessly.

To think that children could die needlessly at school because of a Food Allergy is just................[i]unthinkable[/i].

I mean, I STILL CAN'T FIGURE OUT WHY CERTAIN ITEMS HAVE TO BE EATEN [i]IN MY SON'S CLASSROOM.[/i] THERE ARE OTHER PLACES TO EAT IT.

On Aug 29, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by ALLERGYMOM: [b]Waving back at ya [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

I would like to see your letter.

[/b]

i don't know if this place is ready to see that side of me............... [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]

ps........I'M GONNA NEED A BIGGER SCANNER.

On Aug 29, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by MommaBear: [b] I mean, I STILL CAN'T FIGURE OUT WHY CERTAIN ITEMS HAVE TO BE EATEN [i]IN MY SON'S CLASSROOM.[/i] THERE ARE OTHER PLACES TO EAT IT.[/b]

statistics on inhallation exposures aside..........there is something called "cross contamination". Children are quite skilled at it.

On Aug 29, 2004

I dont think anyone has seen a post from me like the one I just posted [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] I am usually very quit and dont like confrintation(sp)

But I am so stressed right now with MFA DS starting school in a week I am on overload.

So far our school has been great. The SCHOOL were the ones who brought up putting the ban in place. Its only his classroom and eating area not the entire school.

------------------ Have A Great Day

On Aug 29, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by MommaBear: [b] statistics on inhallation exposures aside..........there is something called "cross contamination". Children are quite skilled at it.

[/b]

And it only takes 1 / 44 000 of a peanut to cause a reaction. A smudge on a doorknob would do it. Acckk. How can people not see the reality here?

Must be the forest and trees thing again, eh Momma Bear? (Sorry I am Canadian and eh was the only word that fit [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] )

On Aug 29, 2004

I think people need to realize that SADLY DEADLY food allergies are on the rise and wont be such a minority. So there are going to be more and more bans put into place.

------------------ Have A Great Day

On Aug 29, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by smartalyk: [b] How can people not see the reality here?

[/b]

tell me about it!

[This message has been edited by MommaBear (edited August 30, 2004).]

On Aug 29, 2004

hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm. [i]Illinois State Advisory Council on the Education of Children With Disabilities.[/i]

[url="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/spec-ed/isac.htm"]http://www.isbe.state.il.us/spec-ed/isac.htm[/url]

[i]still wondering if there are any nurses on the council........[/i]

[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]

On Aug 29, 2004

Btw, MB, I have to comment about the 99.9% statistic. In order for that statistic to be POSSIBLE (never mind correct), there would have to be at least 1000 children in that small community school... because if 1 child is PA and 999 are not then 99.9% would be possible. Unless of course, they are considering the PA child to be less than one person. Hmmmmmm.

On Aug 29, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by MommaBear: [b]hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm. [i]Illinois State Advisory Council on the Education of Children With Disabilities.[/i]

[url="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/spec-ed/isac.htm"]http://www.isbe.state.il.us/spec-ed/isac.htm[/url]

[i]still wondering if there are any nurses on the council........[/i]

[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img][/b]

Perhaps there is an opening for a tenth parent? You really should look into it. (Not that you aren't busy with other things [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] )

On Aug 29, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by smartalyk: [b]Btw, MB, I have to comment about the 99.9% statistic. In order for that statistic to be POSSIBLE (never mind correct), there would have to be at least 1000 children in that small community school... because if 1 child is PA and 999 are not then 99.9% would be possible.[/b]

Ya don't say? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]

[b]"Unless of course, they are considering the PA child to be less than one person. Hmmmmmm."[/b]

SAY IT ISN'T SO.

[This message has been edited by MommaBear (edited August 30, 2004).]

On Aug 29, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by smartalyk: [b] Perhaps there is an opening for a tenth parent? You really should look into it. (Not that you aren't busy with other things [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] )

[/b]

Maybe an [i]eleventh parent as well[/i]? My husband is skilled in emergency medicine and is the parent of two beautiful children with special needs as well. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] He's also very adept at prioritizing, and multitask management. And a former Marine. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] He get's things done, that's for sure. And he is a wonderful father to his children. XOXO

Yes, I believe I will check it out. Might be just the place for *me*. I've been highly attracted to special education for quite some time.

On Aug 29, 2004

Go for it MB [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

------------------ Have A Great Day

On Aug 29, 2004

MB,

Did I see you mention that you are looking at getting an aide for your son at school? I am in Canada and there is a whole other set of rules here, but we have an aide this year for our son. She works from just before recess until just after recess as we accessed his highest risk time to be recess and lunch hour. I am very pleased with this result!

And my career is that of a teacher aide myself! So I have great interest in special needs as well [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Is your meeting tomorrow? Am I remembering correctly?

Have a great night all!

On Aug 30, 2004

[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum1/HTML/003519.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum1/HTML/003519.html[/url]

Just felt this needed to be posted in this thread. Big Picture Type of Deal.

On Aug 30, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by turlisa: [b] I have thought about the message I am sending to my child, and the message is "the special needs of ONE does not outweigh the needs of many. the MINORITY does not dictate the rule." and a secondary message is "stand up for what you believe in".

[/b]

I think this has more to do with political ideas afloat in America than a classroom full of vulnerable children. Unfortunately it is in the most precious corners of our lives that these ideas come to fall.

Myself, I choose to Believe in God above all else.

Luke 12:6-7

Are not five sparrows sold for two farthings, and not one of them is forgotten before God?

But even the very hairs of your head are all numbered. Fear not therefore: ye are of more value than many sparrows.

On Aug 30, 2004

You know, I think it all comes down to the whole "me me me" problem rampant in America. I was a psychology/sociology major in college, and did a lot of studying about the isolated nuclear family vs. the extended family/close knit small community. In America, we have this enormous drive for personal success. We teach our kids to be competitive, to be tough, to be smarter and better than everyone else. We teach them that they and their needs and desires are the most important thing of all. Even if we personally strive to avoid this message with our kids, it's out there, on tv and in movies and in school. Remember how junior high and high school was all about one-upmanship? I don't remember a single class where kids are taught how to function as a member of society, where they are taught compassion and sympathy and the importance of putting other's needs above their own when circumstances warrant it.

I want my kids to think about the needs of others. Makes for a much better society that way.

Lori

On Aug 30, 2004

Oh there are so many I need to respond to... First of all, thank you Mary Kay, I am glad at least one person here believes that I am not be inconsiderate, or that I lack compassion.

Many of you are too busy getting into a p*$$!ng contest with me to realize I am not fighting AGAINST this child. Had I been given the option, I would have glady complied on my own. I was not given that choice. I was told I MUST COMPLY! I am fighting FOR the (not 99.9%... geesh build a bridge already) 300+ other students and their parents who are being told they must change their lives to accommodate the (if not ONE) very few.

And about the "me me me" reply I read, what is saying me me me more than the one expecting everybody else to conform to their misfortune.

I am not fighting for a peanut butter sandwich, that is just one in many. Miller School is also banning (besides all peanut/nut items) : all seeds, (sunflower, sesame, poppy etc) all pitted fruits, (plums, peaches, nectarines, cherries, avocados etc) and legumes. (peas, dried beans, lentls etc.)

and YES!!! I will continue to fight this, not because the childs life is unimportant to me, but because it is unreasonable!

On Aug 30, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by MommaBear: [b]NutlessMOM,

by the way......did you get your request?

Or did people have *issues* with it. (People being the way they can be.)[/b]

MommaBear:

People had "issues" with it! After I filed for the 504, the school administration retaliated against me and my children even after the 504 administrator told the principle and school nurse that food allergies are considered a hidden disability. But what made me give up PS for the time being, was when I was cursed out by a second grade teacher in front of a class of second graders (my child included) and all he got was anger management. I quit working at the school and I am now home-schooling. Home-schooling is something that I have wanted to try for a while and so far, it has been going great. Thanks for asking. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

On Aug 30, 2004

This really makes me sad. First, even though i sometimes resent it (see my post the other day), I think it is essential that my family learn that we will accommodate those who need it, and that the needs of the one are as great as the wants or need of the many.

I think no one is listening to each other at this point. Trulisa (I'm sorry if that is the wrong name- I can't see it on this screen and I don't always read the name of the person who pasts- no offense intended), I appreciate that you came here to get information, or try to decide what to do, or whatever. Please understand, though, we fight this battle all the time and most of us feel very strongly about it. You will see that we all have different comfort zones...some people agree with bans, some don't. Just like you and any of your friends, you have different opinions on what you feel comfortable doing with your child. The difference as I see it is that this is a medical issue, and each child's individual medical history dictates how much exposure they can handle, so to speak, before it becomes a life-threatening emergency. I understand that you think it is wrong that the children in your school cannot eat the foods they like or whatever. As a parent of 3 picky eaters, I know how hard it is to make sure they eat healthily. However, what is the solution? If the child's medical history or potential reactions based on other reactions or WHATEVER (you do not know the whole story due to FERPA requirements unless someone has violated confidentiality and the law) has made the school, on the advice of the physician decide to have a peanut ban instead of a peanut free zone, what would you suggest? Federal law makes it mandatory that each child receive a free, appropriate public education in the most natural environment. Most natural environment is defined as where the child would be if he or she did not have the disability or concern. Most children are not homeschooled. That is almost the only option. That does not provide the child with a free appropriate public education as guaranteed in the law. Another option is a homebound teacher, where a teacher would go to the child's home (as opposed to homeschooling). It would be almost impossible for the family to have a homebound teacher provided by the public schools, as that is seen as very restrictive because the child is then only educated a few times a week for about an hour.In addition, those are for children with identified disabilities, not children with medical conditions, unless that medical condition disrupts that indidividual child's learning. I would like my children to grow up in a society where there all our citizens are educated as our children are our future leaders and we want educated leaders. I guess, however, if your community wants to pay the price for giving that child an individual appropriate education(30 hours a week, etc), you could increase property taxes to pay for all the segregated students you would have. Of course, then your system would receive no federal dollars so you would would need to again increase property taxes...it would never end.

Thant being said, I thought you also stated that you would have complied if given the choice but you will fight because you were not given the choice. So the issue is choice? Then address that issue. Go to the principal and talk about involving families so there is choice on matters such as these.

I agree that is is essntial that we teach children to stand up for themselves, but it is also essential to teach children that they live in a world where others needs are important, too. Looking at the big eight allergens, btw, I would not be as concerned with airborne or other exposure from them. Some of them are very difficult to deal with, and many parents here also struggle with that issue. The residue is much more easily cleaned from some of those, however. There is anecdotal versus clinical data regarding airborne reactions, so even some parents of children with food allergies don't believe it can happen. Many physicians, parents, and teachers have seen it happen, though, so I'd err on the side of caution.

I ask you, for the sake of this child and family and the teachers who serve him, please do not make an issue of this. If your issue is control and the fact that you weren't given a choice, make that your issue- how to have choice in your children's educational environment. Also, know that all famileis have different levels of resource. Even if you are not setting out to hurt this child or family, you will...and that is wrong.

Food allergies tend to get worse over time if the chidlren are diagnosed when they are young. I hope that your niece does not have to deal with these issues and that her levels stay where they are or decrease so you will not have as much concern in your family as we have in our families. Again, I appreciate your questions but I really wish you would think about the consequences of your actions. I want my children to know that even if it inconveniences them, it is important to meet the needs of others to the best of our abilities.

Paula

On Aug 30, 2004

PGRUBBS, thank you for not attacking me.

First of all let me clear up, that though the school has not violated the confidentiality of the child, the childs mother has sent a letter to all the parents telling her concerns.

Second of all, the child attended school last year with out a peanut/nut, Fruit, legume ban. His allergist stated that a safe area and proper cleaning would be sufficient to keep this child safe. (at least that is what I got from the article)

The mother stated in the letter that her child felt scared because of the peanut residue in the garbage and possible residue elsewhere and said that he did not make any friends because they all ate peanut butter. While that is very sad it is not a reason to implement a ban.

Every child at one time or another feels as though they dont fit in. I personally was a heavy child in school, I didnt want want everybody to be fat because I was, nor did I not make thin friends. A classmate had red hair and was called carrot top.. she felt like she didnt fit in. I know these are not life threatening so dont bash me on the opinion that this is apples and oranges.

The adult world does not cater to one persons misfortunes, and I think teaching them that the whole population will change to suit their individual needs is only teaching them to be unprepared in the future.

Alot of you here say that by enforcing the ban we will teach our children about the needs of others. I dont agree.. It teaches out children to uphold a ban. what teaches our children about the needs of others is to have them take responsibility for their own actions... for example.... If I send my daughter to school with a peach I tell her to make sure that she immediately puts the pit back in her lunchbox so it wont be in the garbage, and goes straight into the restroom to wash her face and hands so that she doesnt make the little boy sick.

I strongly believe that there is a middle road here.

I truly understand that you all are just trying to protect your children. I really do. But eventually they will have to realize that this is a world full of things that people are allergic to, even fataly allergic to, and they are going to have to accept that and do what they can to protect themselves.

I will still go to the school board meeting next week and ask that this ban be lifted, not to punish the child but again because it is unreasonable. and truthfully only sets the parents up of non allergic children to lawsuits should they inadvertantly break the ban.

[This message has been edited by turlisa (edited August 30, 2004).]

On Aug 30, 2004

Oh boy...

Lisa, you probably didn't pick the best week to post what you did. Lots of us parents are having their children start school (some for the first time!) and our anxiety is high right now.

We are quite honestly afraid that people like you who feel so strongly about peanut butter will put our children in grave danger. For some children, a hint of residue could be disasterous, life-threatening.

I can't speak for the child you referenced in your story, and no offense, but neither can you. YOU don't know everything about this child's medical history. If the parents were able to convince the school of the ban to limit this child's risks, then there's obviously a good reason for it.

You mentioned your sister's child is 1 years old. If your niece is still deathly allergic by the time she goes to school, I'll be willing to bet your sister will be asking for eggs to be banned at school to protect your niece UNTIL she is old enough to know how to protect herself!

I know of a preschool that has banned milk, egg, and peanut products all for the safety of one highly allergic child. IMAGINE THAT?!? I commend that preschool for wanting to keep that child safe.

So, you're teaching your daughter to stand up for herself while putting another child's life at risk??!! I'm so confused by that.

By the way, I have picky eaters too ON TOP of the food allergies. It's frustrating, but they won't starve. I'm sure your daughter could find something else to eat.

Allergymom: BIG HUGS}}}}}} Hope all goes well for ds this week.

Momma Bear: I don't ever want to be on the opposite end of a debate with you [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]

------------------ Meg, mom to: Matt 2 yrs. PA,MA,EA Sean 2 yrs. NKA

On Aug 30, 2004

Paula,

WOW! what an amazing response. Thank you for that [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Lisa, You made your last post at the same time I made mine. I've read your reference to the mom's letter sent home. I understand more now how you feel a ban isn't necessary if it's STRICTLY because of fitting in and making friends. However, if this were my child, it would break my heart that he was so isolated.

I hope the parents in your school can work together for the safety of this little boy and the happiness of all the children.

------------------ Meg, mom to: Matt 2 yrs. PA,MA,EA Sean 2 yrs. NKA

On Aug 30, 2004

again, I am not fighting FOR peanut butter. I am fighting because this is unreasonable. the school will never be completely nut free and you all here cant tell me with any degree of honesty that you think it will be.

(BTW about my neice with the egg allergy. her mother already said wouldnt expect the school to ban all egg products because there are other children besides hers.)

On Aug 30, 2004

mommyofmatt...Thank you. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] and I agree with you 100%

Paula...another WOW!!! Very well said [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

------------------ Have A Great Day

On Aug 30, 2004

I need to take a nap and then I'll respond. Stayed up waaaaaay too late last night.

On Aug 30, 2004

MB my thoughts are with you today and I hope everything goes well! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

------------------ Have A Great Day

On Aug 30, 2004

Lisa,

I used to feel like your sister does, I didn't want to impose on other people...Then my son had a reaction (which thankfully wasn't life threatening [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]) because I didn't want to bother other people.

The guilt that I felt of putting other people's wants over my son's safety is not something I'll forget too easily.

I wish the best for your niece and for all our children.

------------------ Meg, mom to: Matt 2 yrs. PA,MA,EA Sean 2 yrs. NKA

On Aug 30, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by mommyofmatt: [b]Momma Bear: I don't ever want to be on the opposite end of a debate with you [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]

[/b]

The judicious application of logic removes all fear. Of debate, I mean. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/cool.gif[/img]

Guess what? Just returned home from meeting with school reps. [i] A designation of OHI for Peanut Allergy and Asthma was determined.[/i] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] Still waiting on some OT/PT evals for the orthopedic determination.

On Aug 30, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by mommyofmatt: [b] The guilt that I felt of putting other people's wants over my son's safety is not something I'll forget too easily.

[/b]

[b]I completely, completely, absolutely understand.[/b] Been There, [i]Done That.[/i]

On Aug 30, 2004

No need for me to reply. Paula said it best!

On Aug 30, 2004

Hearing parents complain about their child not being able to have peanut butter for lunch is unbeliable. My children, who are very picky, and allergic to peanuts, have found other foods they can eat. There is yogurt, fluff, cheese, cream cheese, or jelly sandwiches for children who do not eat meats. There are "peanut free" butter products out there and they do not have to be purchased at speciality stores. I eat soynut butter with chocolate. The product is made in a peanut free faculity and it taste great. There is also a sunflower butter that taste like peanut butter that is also safe.

When you see your child or spouse going through a reaction you never forget the way they look or how you feel at that time. Every day I wish that I could have the allergy instead of my preicous children but that's not how it works. So, I have to protect them until they are able to defend for themselves. It does not matter how angry ignorant, selfish parents are, I will always voice how important it is to protect children with an allergy that is life threatening.

On Aug 30, 2004

My son (mfa) is 1 of approximately 400 students at his school. One half of one percent of the student body lives in my home (my food allergic son and his younger brother), so my food allergic son is .25% of the student body at his school. 100% - 99.9% = .1%...

My oldest son is the only peanut allergic student on campus, AFAIK. So which half of my son is peanut allergic?

The school and school district value my son, and another food allergic classmate enough to ban edible birthday treats in his classroom for the past 2 years. They value my son enough to turn a event that revolved around peanuts (peanut carnival) into a pasta carnival.

Most of Jason's classmates have been very thoughtful. Most tend to remind their parents of his allergies when sending in Valentines. I frequently get comments from parents about it.

Compassion is a great thing to teach your kids. It's un(expletive)beleiveable that some people place a sandwich over someone elses life.

I would do anything short of risking my own life to protect ANYONES child, not just my own. Would you (general you), not be upset if someone else who was driving your child somewhere refused to have your child wear a seatbelt?

[This message has been edited by solarflare (edited August 30, 2004).]

On Aug 30, 2004

Hi Turlisa,

Just have a question for you... when you read my posts to you... did you think I was attacking you? Because when I re-read them, I can't see it. I did challenge your perspective because mine is different, but I can't see anything that is "attacking" in nature.

Okay, well there was the post I made about the 99.9% statistic, maybe that wasn't very nice to pick apart. I am sorry for that. I actually was having fun with numbers when I posted that. The statistic itself didn't really bother me. (Again, sorry)

Our school just sent home the newsletter today and they are requesting an egg ban. I am the parent of that child and didn't even realize they were doing this! Oh my. I am not looking forward to finding out who is upset about it. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img]

On Aug 31, 2004

Lisa, I hope you are still reading. I want to apologize for responding emotionally. While I'm not making excuses for myself, I would like to explain why.

My son almost died at the age of two from an anaphylactic reaction. It was horrible. When he was in daycare, his room went peanut-free. I didn't request it. The school made the decision after realizing that toddlers are simply too messy and peanut butter gets all over everything. They couldn't keep him safe. However, they didn't go so far as a ban...just kept the items out of his room.

When he turned three, he moved into the preschool room. Since he was with 3-5 year olds, they decided not to continue the peanut free room but simply to avoid peanut-containing snacks. One day during the first month or so I was dropping him off and saw on the snack table a HUGE bowl of peanut butter and a plate of crackers. This happened because they had a teacher from another room filling in. Call me emotionally unstable or overprotective or whatever, but I had an anxiety attack and just stood there, unable to speak and fighting tears. All I could think about was peanut butter smeared all over everything my son worked with (tables, chairs, toys), and this was less than a year after his anaphylactic reaction. Another teacher came in, took one look at my face, put her arms around my shoulders, and had the bowl removed and the table wiped down.

If they had continued the peanut ban in his classroom this wouldn't have happened. And to this day I wonder what might have happened if I had dropped him off a couple of minutes earlier, or the teacher had brought in the bowl of PB a little bit later? At three, I had already taught him not to eat anything I didn't send from home, but couldn't trust he'd remember - 3 is way too young to trust with that kind of responsibility.

Then we moved and his new pre-school/kindergarten voluntarily went peanut and nut free, because the teachers didn't feel they could monitor the kids well enough to ensure peanut residue didn't get smeared all over the place. We had at least one parent get very irate that she wasn't given a choice, that it violated her daughter's rights, that it was my son's responsibility to keep himself safe. Which I reacted to with tears but bit my tongue and let the school handle it.

Lisa, school in many ways is a very artificial environment. Where else, in childhood or adulthood, is an allergic individual likely to find themselves surrounded, in close quarters, by numerous individuals consuming the very food that they are allergic to? It's not a test of how they will manage their allergy as adults...because they won't ever find themselves in that dangerous a situation out in the "real world".

My son is about to begin first grade in a public school. Lunch is eaten in the classroom. I am not asking for a school-wide ban because the school feels they can work out the safety of my son without one. However, if my son has any reactions at all, you'd better believe I'll seek one.

I agree with you that the number of items banned seems excessive. Have you asked for the rationale behind it? I in all honesty have never heard of anyone reacting to the touch or smell of a fruit pit. Generally it's peanuts or peanut butter that cause airborne and contact reactions, because the the peanut allergen lingers for weeks.

It just kills me when people get angry because I'm trying to keep my son safe, instead of asking why. Which is why I'm apologizing, because you did actually take the time to ask...it just seemed like you were seeking confirmation that the request was irrational. I don't know the child's health history...there may very well be a doctor backing this up.

Those of us on this board deal with an amazing amount of stress every day. It's not easy to keep our children safe, and for most of us homeschooling isn't an option. Thank God that in this country a "free and appropriate" education is guaranteed, and the disability laws protect our children and force the schools to provide as safe an environment as possible. Because no one else cares about the safety of our children, especially not if they feel the school's policies encroach upon their "rights" and "choices".

Not an attack. Just a statement of what I've experienced.

Lori

[This message has been edited by Munchkin's Mom (edited January 18, 2006).]

On Aug 31, 2004

Munchkin's Mom,

I hope you donot mind if I repeat what you have said,Iwas asked what Little V does when she is in public places.At the time I was asked this ? I just finished up a meeting with the [b]Team[/b] I was asking for a aide to watch over Little V during lunch and snacks,and any time food was present.

I was upset over the meeting and could not get my thoughts togeather,when asked this ?.

Thank you, You have helped me to answer this ? in a proper manner.

Love this site Synthia

school in many ways is a very artificial environment. Where else, in childhood or adulthood, is an allergic individual likely to find themselves surrounded, in close quarters, by numerous individuals consuming the very food that they are allergic to? It's not a test of how they will manage their allergy as adults...because they won't ever find themselves in that dangerous a situation out in the "real world".

On Aug 31, 2004

Lori,

No I have never felt attacked by you, and after rereading alot of posts I realize that most of them are written by stressed out moms of children that they are scared to death for.

I didnt come here to pick a fight or for confirmation, I really just wanted to educate myself on this matter.

I still believe the ban at our school is unreasonable. To the many of you who mentioned sunbutter, sunflower seeds were specifically mentioned as a BAN item, but I dont want to sway from the point again that I am not fighting for PEANUT BUTTER in general. I honestly and truly believe that there is a way to make this child safe with out banning all the foods mentioned. I apologise for stressing you all out even more, and I did not mean to have it sound like I was having a My child vs. Your child debate, that wasnt my intention at all. I just think that there is a better approach to this than an all out ban. If nothing else a ban just p*$$es the parents of nonfood allergic children off to the point where they dont want to learn of ways they can help.

Lisa

[This message has been edited by turlisa (edited August 31, 2004).]

[This message has been edited by turlisa (edited August 31, 2004).]

On Aug 31, 2004

Lisa,

Thank you so much for your last response [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] After some emotional back and forth, maybe we see each other's point of view a little more?

Good luck in school this year, and thanks for taking the time to learn more about this allergy! I'm sure you had your moments where you wanted to hurl your computer out the window once the debate got under way [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img])

------------------ Meg, mom to: Matt 2 yrs. PA,MA,EA Sean 2 yrs. NKA

On Aug 31, 2004

I wasn't planning to respond to this thread, because I'm not really that sympathetic to parents fighting peanut bans, for obvious reasons. And I really couldn't understand why one of those parents would post here. (Bear with me Lisa, I know I'm starting out rather belligerently.)

But in reading her description of the ban, I have to agree that it's pretty unreasonable. I support peanut bans, and we're sending our PA daughter to a private school that is peanut free, because I think it's the safest place for her. But this school has not only banned peanuts, but also almost any other food that could reasonably be substituted for peanut butter as a protein source. This kind of a sweeping ban doesn't even make sense, because the reasons for banning peanuts (IMO, anyway) have to do with longlasting residue, and the possibility of airborne reactions. Banning fruit with pits??!! Honestly! Is this student actually allergic to all other legumes, nuts, seeds, fruit, etc.? I have to think that this kind of ban, that isn't narrowly tailored to do what is necessary to keep a child safe, but no more, really does hurt us in the long run.

I wish I could offer some useful advice, Lisa. I think if I were you I would try to get the ban restricted to only those foods that the child is actually allergic to. I really think it is unnecessary to ban foods that the parent is trying to avoid just to be careful. (I'm going on the assumption that that is what is going on here; that's just the impression I got.)

Good luck to you.

On Aug 31, 2004

Oh, I forgot,

Momma Bear, great news! Glad to hear you're making progress with your ds' school [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]

------------------ Meg, mom to: Matt 2 yrs. PA,MA,EA Sean 2 yrs. NKA

On Aug 31, 2004

what is this "soynut butter with chocolate" actually called and where do you find it? If my daughter thought she could have chocolate for lunch she would be in absolute heaven!

On Aug 31, 2004

I.M. Healthy Soynut butter makes a chocolate variety! It's a pretty well-known brand -- many "regular" grocery stores carry it, as well as places like Whole Foods. I've only seen the chocolate variety on the shelf at Whole Foods -- but you ought to be able to request it anyplace you find the other jars.

Raise a new thread if you have difficulty finding it, and I'll see if I can give you a hand.

I like to support win-win situations! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Sue

On Aug 31, 2004

We just bought the I.M. Healthy SoyNut Butter with Chocolate this week, but haven't had a chance to try it yet. My daughter's eyes lit up when I asked her if she wanted it. But Lisa, your daughter wouldn't be able to bring it to school with the ban as it's proposed, would she?

On Aug 31, 2004

good question Kim, Probably not.

On Aug 31, 2004

Lisa,

I am one of those parents that responded in an emotional way. If I seemed a little harsh I am sorry. I usually dont react in that way. I would rather educate than offend. So if I did I am sorry.

That post was coming from a mom who in one week will have to turn over the safety of her MFA child to another person for part of the day. I have to learn to trust people to take care of him and make sure he is safe. I have to rely on strangers ( teachers & other parents) to make sure that he is kept away from the things that could kill him. Since ds's dx over 4 years ago he has rarely been with anyone but myself or DH. I am stepping into the unknown here and I am terrified. I know as mother you can understand that. I also dont know what kind of reaction I will get from other parents and thats a big stress. BTW the letter sent to the parents from my sons school and myself was a REQUEST for these food items not to be brought into his classroom. So I guess that is really not a ban. So I hope I will get a positive response.

I hope that everything works out for both parties involved. Also the sunbutter is quite tasty if you like sunflower seeds. It looks and smells so much like pb that when I opened a jar I almost had a panic attack. I have only bought that one jar bc of that reason.I do hope that you all can find a happy medium.

------------------ Have A Great Day

On Aug 31, 2004

I admit to coming to this thread late - but it seems like the difficulties are worked out...Best to everyone for this school year.

To M'smom - the I.M. Healthy Chocolate Butter is dark brown (like nutella) and no one would think it was PB. The honey, chunky and regular soynut butter flavors do look like PB.

At any case, writing Soy Nut butter on the baggie has been OK with the lunch room monitors that work at dd's school.

Sorry to take this thread sort of off topic. Happy New School Year to all.

On Sep 1, 2004

I personally would love to see the ban on the nuts and the seeds, my ds has drawn the lucky three allergies to peanuts,soy and sunflower, so even the residues from the popular alternative butters are deadly to him. We are working very hard to teach him to keep himself safe,but he is only 3 1/2. Our last reaction was about two weeks ago, ds was playing with the assembly line at the museum, all of a sudden he's crying and red and eyes and nose are running. Thankfully it was halted with a thorough flushing of soap and water. I personally think it is of more benefit to have the strict no eating except in the cafeteria and handwashing rules. However given the clingy nature that nut and seed butters tend to have, they are hard to clean up under the best of circumstances. I actually think that your heart is in the right place Turlisa, however without a ban most people do not think like you do. You would avoid it voluntarily, some parents even with a ban in place would do everything in their power to sneak it in out of spite or whatever, to me that's scary. Maybe you could form a parent initiative and give some support from the perspective of a non FA parent who although disagrees with the ban, would choose anyways to comply,perhaps educating others who cannot get over the fact that these things have been banned. I"ll have to look up the articles, if the ban sticks maybe we'll move [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] .

On Sep 1, 2004

Kim M., you made a good point about whether or not the child is allergic or if some of the foods banned are foods that are being avoided. For example, I have that *thing* about seeds although Jesse certainly does eat sesame seeds and poppy seeds if they're on a bun, but sunflower seeds, for example. I still haven't been able to find any that aren't "may contain trace peanuts". So, we, as a peanut/tree nut free family don't buy sunflower seeds.

There are also a lot of members on this board who do choose to avoid other legumes as well "just in case". However, avoidance and an allergy are two different things.

I did post in turlisa's other thread about a reasonable or acceptable compromise and perhaps I don't have the right to speak at all because my son (touch wood) is PA only. I understand why it is so important to have "peanut free" classrooms and dream of "peanut free" schools (the whole residue thing).

As I also posted in that thread, I don't know enough about any other food allergies to begin to understand such a broad ban on foods, but certainly have seen it posted about here. Again, talking about katiee, and hoping she doesn't cringe every time I post it, but last year, her non-PA child was in a class with all of the "allergy kids" of that grade. It was peanut free, chicken free, egg free, not clear what else. There was a list.

For a class to have a very broad ban, it is perhaps do-able. I'm not sure about the whole school.

As I also posted in turlisa's other thread, the school couldn't simply come up with this ban by themselves, but must have been presented with some kind of documentation, perhaps medical, to validate such a request on the part of the allergic parent. The FA parent may have presented a plan to the school that the administrators couldn't think of any alternatives to and they chose to "run with it".

(For example, yesterday, I presented Jesse's written school plan for HIM only to his new school for PA only and even after saying that other PA parents may not have the same concerns I have, the new school has decided to use his plan to try to have a "reduce the risk" school. In discussing it with the administration yesterday, I was quite clear that this was what I felt I needed for MY son, but that the other PA parents involved may not feel it was necessary. On the other hand, of course, a lot of PA parents may feel that MORE was required than what is in our plan).

What I'm trying to say is I walked into the school yesterday with a written plan, something that had never been presented to the school before, and because it's laid out, because it has been done before, etc., the school administration decided to "run with it" rather than question alternatives. I'm wondering if that's what happened in this situation.

For me, looking at the situation, I would expect, if my child was allergic to the list of foods presented, the classroom to be "free" of those items (or a lunch table in the cafeteria to be "free" of those items), but I wouldn't expect a school wide ban. I would dream of one, of course, but I wouldn't expect or even hope for one. The classroom where my child was going to eat (or table), yes, but not the whole school.

I wasn't able to respond *properly* turlisa, at the beginning of your thread, for which I apologize, because to me, it seemed like a discussion against peanut bans (even though you were clear in your post) and quite frankly, I'm tired of talking about it. It seems like this year (and perhaps it's just me and the hope that things might get easier as our children get older in the school system), there has been a lot of uproar about bans, etc. that I haven't seen posted here before (not that there hasn't been upset before).

For anyone that has not seen it (and made it to the end of this post [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img] ) Nutternomore has posted a link to an article regarding this ban in turlisa's other thread, which I do feel is important to read.

Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

On Sep 1, 2004

After reading this whole post (maybe I missed some it's late), there are still things I am not sure of:

1) I'm assuming this is a whole school ban? Is this because it's such a small school? Would you really be against a classroom ban at this young age? I think many FA individuals would agree that an allergic free classroom and a suitable table to eat at would suffice.

2) How could you be against the choice of the board or the administration -- isn't that we elect/hire them to look out for the welfare of all?

3) I'm curious for you to answer the question about what you do when your niece comes over. Aren't eggs different in that many outgrow them earlier and those that are allergic to the smell of raw eggs cooking in the cafeteria would not be affected because the cooking is done behind the scenes and not out where all the children are? I don't know -- just asking.

One other thing -- did you read Munchkin's Mom post on the real world? I can see you've come full circle a little, so you are interested in opinions here, but this is not the post I would have hoped to read the day my daughter started kindergarten.

On Sep 1, 2004

After reading this whole post (maybe I missed some it's late), there are still things I am not sure of:

1) I'm assuming this is a whole school ban? Is this because it's such a small school? Would you really be against a classroom ban at this young age? I think many FA individuals would agree that an allergic free classroom and a suitable table to eat at would suffice.

2) How could you be against the choice of the board or the administration -- isn't that we elect/hire them to look out for the welfare of all?

3) I'm curious for you to answer the question about what you do when your niece comes over. Aren't eggs different in that many outgrow them earlier and those that are allergic to the smell of raw eggs cooking in the cafeteria would not be affected because the cooking is done behind the scenes and not out where all the children are? I don't know -- just asking.

One other thing -- did you read Munchkin's Mom post on the real world? I can see you've come full circle a little, so you are interested in opinions here, but this is not the post I would have hoped to read the day my daughter started kindergarten. It was very disheartening to hear it is not your problem to read labels, especially since labels are getting easier to read.

Someone said it already: It takes a village to raise a child. I think we've gotten away from that today.

One more thing, sorry, but food allergic children are notorious for being the pickiest eaters.

On Sep 1, 2004

After reading this whole post (maybe I missed some it's late), there are still things I am not sure of:

1) I'm assuming this is a whole school ban? Is this because it's such a small school? Would you really be against a classroom ban at this young age? I think many FA individuals would agree that an allergic free classroom and a suitable table to eat at would suffice.

2) How could you be against the choice of the board or the administration -- isn't that we elect/hire them to look out for the welfare of all?

3) I'm curious for you to answer the question about what you do when your niece comes over. Aren't eggs different in that many outgrow them earlier and those that are allergic to the smell of raw eggs cooking in the cafeteria would not be affected because the cooking is done behind the scenes and not out where all the children are? I don't know -- just asking.

One other thing -- did you read Munchkin's Mom post on the real world? I can see you've come full circle a little, so you are interested in opinions here, but this is not the post I would have hoped to read the day my daughter started kindergarten. It was very disheartening to hear it is not your problem to read labels, especially since labels are getting easier to read.

Someone said it already: It takes a village to raise a child. I think we've gotten away from that today.

One more thing, sorry, but food allergic children are notorious for being the pickiest eaters.

On Sep 1, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by doreen: [b] I'm curious for you to answer the question about what you do when your niece comes over. [/b]

My family is not a big user of eggs, when my neice is over here ( and her being such a young age) the problem has really never come up. I have 3 kids... a 6 yr old and 3 yr old twins... very rarely do we ever have anybody stay for dinner simply because of the room issue... we dont have much of it [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] but like I said.. with her being such a young age, she is still eating mostly baby food which her mother brings with her.

On Sep 1, 2004

doreen, great to see you posting! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

On Sep 2, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by turlisa: [b] My family is not a big user of eggs, when my neice is over here ( and her being such a young age) the problem has really never come up. I have 3 kids... a 6 yr old and 3 yr old twins... very rarely do we ever have anybody stay for dinner simply because of the room issue... we dont have much of it [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] but like I said.. with her being such a young age, she is still eating mostly baby food which her mother brings with her.[/b]

Even tho you state the problem hasn't come up (BTW, I can look back now, and see where problems regarding my cubs food allergies DID come up, but I was just [i]unaware[/i] of the cause......), again, even tho you state the problem hasn't come up,

[i]how will you deal with it if and when it does[/i]? Time flies..............

You know, like a birthday cake, a summer snack, numerous items that might be in your household?

There are quite a few members here who's children have not "outgrown" their egg allergies.

ps. Does your niece have one food allergy? Or more?

On Sep 2, 2004

..........[i]Holidays?[/i]

On Sep 2, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by MommaBear:

There are quite a few members here who's children have not "outgrown" their egg allergies.

[/B]

Waving wildly -- 'Oh hi' [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Jason Caitlin 4-17-00 Allergic to Dairy, Egg, Wheat, Bananas, Grapes, Rye, Sesame, Beef, Garlic, Mustard, Onion, Peas and Avoiding Latex and all Nuts Sara 2-13-98 NKA (Avoiding Nuts) Meghan 2-28-03 NKA (Avoiding Nuts) [url="http://community.webshots.com/user/jtolpin"]http://community.webshots.com/user/jtolpin[/url]

On Sep 2, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by doreen: [b]2) How could you be against the choice of the board or the administration -- isn't that we elect/hire them to look out for the welfare of all?

[/b]

doreen, please tell me you are joking on this one?! Thank goodness we do live in a democracy. We all have every right to be against any decision those whom we elect/hire make.

(Sorry to go off topic, but that sentence just jumped out at me and I couldn't just let it go.)

[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] Miriam

On Sep 2, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by California Mom: [b] doreen, please tell me you are joking on this one?! Thank goodness we do live in a democracy.

[/b]

[i]republic..................[/i] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]

"[b](Sorry to go off topic, but that sentence just jumped out at me and I couldn't just let it go.)[/b]"

Completely Understand.

On Sep 2, 2004

Mommbear posted:

There are quite a few members here who's children have not "outgrown" their egg allergies.

Thank you. I am one of those members.

------------------ Have A Great Day

On Sep 2, 2004

doreen, off topic (so apologies, turlisa), but how was your child's first day of school? I can well imagine that YOU needed a hug! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

On Sep 2, 2004

Yesterday, I just touched on the subject of the school with my SIL (she has three daughters, twins that are 11 and one that is 9) and I told her that my meeting went well and that the school was probably going to try to become a "reduce the risk" school.

I kinda got a raised eyebrow look and an "oh" out of her and that was the end of that conversation.

Now, I do have to say that my SIL has been great as far as dealing with my son's allergy since we moved right around the corner from them (and right around the corner from my MIL on the other side - can anyone sing Stuck in the Middle With You by Steeler's Wheel and NOT think of Reservoir Dogs? Anyway.....), but she has also admitted to sending pb into a "peanut free" classroom and then being upset with the school when HER children had to eat outside of the classroom (well, dear, your children brought poison into the classroom, what do you expect?).

Now, she's my SIL and I *may* be able to educate her and she *may* feel okay about a reduce the risk school and she may not. But she's not opening embracing it, that's for sure. If anything is said through the year about *it*, it won't be to me.

Again, I do have to think that the school had to be presented with medical documentation before they could request such a widespread ban and they must have been presented with something else from the parents (i.e., a written plan) that did look work-able to them.

When I think of the list that has been presented, I'm trying to think if I, personally, could easily comply. Well, of course with the peanuts/tree nuts. I don't send seeds into school with my children. I don't send any legumes in either. Even when it comes to fruit, I don't think I send fruit with pits in it (they're seasonal here, or out of season terribly expensive). So yes, actually, I could comply with the ban.

doreen, I know exactly how you felt about the original thread starter because I couldn't comment at the time it was presented. I jump through hoops, as we all do, every year, to get my child through the door of a school.

I wish I was like my SIL who just had to go over and register her children and can just send them over to the school next Tuesday, no meetings with the principal/vice principal, no having to go in and train people, no having to worry about if my child could DIE.

Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

On Sep 2, 2004

Here's my question...turlisa. If your child was PA would you expect the school system to do all they could to ensure your child's safety or would you be okay with your child's life being in danger each day? If the school said to you "We know your child could die, but so many children love peanut butter so we're going to allow it in school at your child's risk". What would be your first thought at that comment? If you tell me you'd be okay with that, I wont believe you. Put yourself in our shoes?

On Sep 2, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by skocsis: [b]Here's my question...turlisa. If your child was PA would you expect the school system to do all they could to ensure your child's safety or would you be okay with your child's life being in danger each day? If the school said to you "We know your child could die, but so many children love peanut butter so we're going to allow it in school at your child's risk". What would be your first thought at that comment? If you tell me you'd be okay with that, I wont believe you. Put yourself in our shoes?[/b]

you havent read all my posts, have you? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

On Sep 2, 2004

You are correct...I did not read all of the posts, there were too many and time did not permit. I read at least the first page and possibly the second before I gave up. This was obviously a post that hit a nearve with a lot of people. I commented because a neighbor spoke of the school her oldest child was going to be attending and was upset because it was peanut free. She wanted to send pb&j in his lunch because it was easy. Ironcially, her third child developed PA and her whole tune towards the school changed! I just feel, as this case shows, it's easy to criticize when it doesn't affect you.

On Sep 2, 2004

OK, thank God we live in a democracy. When you put it that way it sounds much worse. It was 1AM. I was also having a hard time posting (as you can see from my 3 posts).What I meant was, yeah, the Board of Ed and the administration probably should have had a meeting on the topic to at least inform parents this sort of thing was coming. However, in the end, aren't they supposed to balance the needs of all. If we don't feel they are doing an adequate job, then we ourselves could run for office if we wanted. Lisa said it wasn't her job to look after our kids, but, like someone else said, thank God the district feels it's theirs. Can't type anymore while holding screaming child -- write more later.

On Sep 2, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by doreen: [b] Lisa said it wasn't her job to look after our kids[/b]

A statement I made while I was still quite ticked off and ignorant about peanut allergies. I apologise for that. But if you will notice, I am learniing.

On Sep 2, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by turlisa: [b] I apologise for that. But if you will notice, I am learniing. [/b]

but evidently I am not learning how to spell. lol

On Sep 2, 2004

Can't find the first part of my post now, but it just seems that Lisa is saying on the one hand that she would have volunteered not to send peanuts in and on the other hand that's all her kid eats, etc. let's not relive the whole debate. It seems a bit contradictory.

It's like someone else said, maybe complain to the board that you didn't like the process, but don't focus on the ban. Like I asked before, how small is this school? Is that the reason? Kim M said maybe you could fight for the things the kid is actually allergic to. The ban does seem kind of intensive, and, in saying that, I understand why you might not have been happy about not being involved in the process.

In jumping on the egg allergy, I don't see why those couldn't be eliminated either (in a classroom or a separate table also). I'm talking about classrooms here, not the whole school. Lisa I don't believe you ever said you thought that was reasonable.

Well, it's late again, and who knows if I'm making any sense.

ALTERNATIVE -- thanks for noticing. I did email you! Have a new email though. First day went well except for a fast and clueless afternoon bus driver -- save for that post. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

On Sep 2, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by doreen: [b]Can't find the first part of my post now, but it just seems that Lisa is saying on the one hand that she would have volunteered not to send peanuts in and on the other hand that's all her kid eats, etc. let's not relive the whole debate. It seems a bit contradictory. [/b]

Doreen, Doreen, Doreen, [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]

You havent read all of my posts either. Lets just do this in a nutshell... When Miller school decided to go nut/seed free, they did not inform the parents of all, we found out thru the media. The article I read was that all these foods were banned. I was furious. (please also read the thread I started on reasonable compromise) but after I found this site and really started reading what you all were saying, I realised I was more angry about the way it all happened and that by fighting it for that reason was not doing the boy in question any good.

and yes, the only cold sandwiches my daughter likes is Salami (no cheese, no nothing, just salami on bread lol) and PB&Fluff. So I am thinking my dd is going to be eating an awful lot of salami. Good news though.. I was given the menu for the month of Sept, and the first week she goes full day, there are 3 days she will like the hot lunch, so I feel better about the variety in her diet at school.

and since my first post, I have found out that not all the foods I mentioned are actually banned, though the school will not be serving them, students can still bring the foods that he is allergic to, but that he actually has to injest to have a reaction. (we are asked to limit seeds though)

So even though my first post was ... how do I put it... insensitive (to say the least, especially at this time of year) I do not feel the same way I did then.

I hope this clears things up for you a little. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

By the way... I am awaiting a call from the parents. I was contacted by one of their friends and I am hoping that they will call me soon... I have another thread about that.

Lisa

On Sep 3, 2004

Lisa HI! Apparently we were on at the same time both times, but for whatever reason the recent posts aren't showing up on my computer. I did read all your posts, but honestly 11PM is early for me if I get on here, because I have a six-month old, so I'm not always coherent. Seems like you have a lot of information, and it's easy to get heated about our children. It's districts like yours that sometimes make it worse for the rest of them. They were trying to do a good thing (at least liability wise for them if nothing else) and made it worse by not thinking it out. I missed the part about being informed by the media -- anything involved with children where we are informed by the media is bad!

Good luck -- I'll try to check out your other posts.

On Sep 3, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by MommaBear: [b] There are quite a few members here who's children have not "outgrown" their egg allergies. [/b]

My Jason is 7 and is still extremely allergic to egg whites. At this point we don't expect him to outgrow his egg allergy.

On Sep 10, 2004

I am glad to see that a compromise was made! Everyone's posts had merit and it sure was interesting and quiet educational to read.

My son is now 6 years old and is now in first grade. Now eating in the school cafeteria that is not peanut/tree nut free. But thanks to our most exceptional school nurse she is helping all the peanut/treenut allergy sufferers to be comfortable by seating them in strategic places but still at the same table. There are now 9 PA sufferers in the school.

My son however is a special case as he is almost literally a "boy in a bubble". He is Peanut allergy and tree nut allergy. Allergic also to eggs, seafood -all and shellfish, bee stings (anaphylaxtic), all legumes, and seeds (mustard, sesame, poppy, etc), garlic, chicken, mold and mildew, pollen and tree pollen, LATEX and many more to list. I am really blessed and I thank god each day for the school personnel that have been extremely helpful and who have educated themselves about these allergies especially the peanut and tree nuts.

So when I read about the concerns of others I can relate and I also take into consideration the concerns of others with children that are allergy free. I am often touched though more so with the children in my son's class as they are more careful and thoughtful about my son's allergies than their own parents. Still it helps because they do sort of force their parents not to bring in any food or stuff that they think my son MIGHT be allergic to. I have noticed that the more open we are to listen and more we express our concerns at the PTA meetings the better it is to educate the parents.

Sorry this is long. I tend to get carried away when my emotions are triggered. lol

On Sep 10, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by MommaBear: [b]hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm. [i]Illinois State Advisory Council on the Education of Children With Disabilities.[/i]

[url="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/spec-ed/isac.htm"]http://www.isbe.state.il.us/spec-ed/isac.htm[/url]

[i]still wondering if there are any nurses on the council........[/i]

[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img][/b]

mental note to self.........

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