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Posted on: Thu, 01/26/2006 - 8:47am
qdebbie1's picture
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Joined: 02/10/2005 - 09:00

Life isnt fair.
Segregation is Illegal.
Do they have all the minority children in one classroom.
How about the children who speak spanish better than english.
Maybe a special classroom for kids who are on free/reduced lunch.
No no no. This is not only unfair, its illegal and downright wrong.
I agree with Gail. Ask for it in writing so you can fully "understand"what is going on. Get the "policy" before you really get started on this. This would be textbook fun for OCR.
Your child has a right to an education just like any other child without a "hidden disability". Assert those rights.

Posted on: Thu, 01/26/2006 - 9:32am
Gail W's picture
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Joined: 12/06/2001 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by ZeniaD:
[b] These policies were put into place several years ago, by moms who begged for them, but I just don't think it is right. [/b]
This may have first started as segregation by request/consent. I mean, can a group with a shared gender/race/disability choose, as a group, to be segregated from the general school population? I don't know if that was "legal" (segregation by request), but regardless, it seems discriminatory to establish this as a practice.
This situation is very interesting.

Posted on: Fri, 01/27/2006 - 1:02am
ZeniaD's picture
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Joined: 01/26/2006 - 09:00

I doubt that there is anything in writing about this - the school district's lawyers wouldn't allow it.
I will find out though.
I am really reluctant to broach the topic with the principal though because she is just a very nasty retaliatory person. I expressed concerns to her last about the way the weigh and measure the kids (20 kids , boys & girls in room with a scale and two volunteer parents calling out their height & weight to each other in front of the group). I told her I thought it was strange that parents chaperones on a field trip weren't allowed to have important medical information about the children the were supervising ( who has allergies, diabetes etc.) but they could make the childrens height & weight public information in front of their peers?
Within days my daughter who has never had problems at school before - started having all kinds of problems with her teacher (who is personal friend of the principal).
I know they like to keep all the kids in one because then they don't have train as many teachers on how to handle allergic reactions. To be fair some parents are thrilled that their kids have this safe environment to go to school, and some parents would be downright livid if they thought I was attacking this safe haven. Ultimately, I'm not sure how much safer it can be when all the classes share communal spaces like bathrooms, gyms, the library - which are disinfected like the cafeteria.
I think the original intent was to fill the class with children who had food any allergies so that if certain foods had to be banned from the classroom (namely PB) the parents would be more understanding.
It sounds like so many of you are now fighting to get any cooperation from your schools and our school system went through this years ago and it has evolved into this really strange kind of discrimination which is defended as being the safest option for the children. Maybe it is a "be careful what you ask for" situation.
I'll see what I can find out, but we are looking into other schools - it may be easier than trying to fight the other parents and the school system.

Posted on: Fri, 01/27/2006 - 2:32am
Greenlady's picture
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Joined: 06/30/2004 - 09:00

I have to agree that I'm not sure if it is really a "safe haven." If (God forbid) an allergin was somehow introduced into the classroom and all the PA kids started reacting at once, how would they handle it?
I understand - I really do - about not wanting to buck the system, but this situation really sounds toxic to me. (No pun intended). Is it possible to make an anonymous complain to OCR? Are there other school options open to you? I hope you can find a solution that works for your family soon.

Posted on: Fri, 01/27/2006 - 2:50am
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by qdebbie1:
[b]Life isnt fair.
Segregation is Illegal.
Do they have all the minority children in one classroom.
How about the children who speak spanish better than english.
Maybe a special classroom for kids who are on free/reduced lunch.
No no no. This is not only unfair, its illegal and downright wrong.
I agree with Gail. Ask for it in writing so you can fully "understand"what is going on. Get the "policy" before you really get started on this. This would be textbook fun for OCR.
Your child has a right to an education just like any other child without a "hidden disability". Assert those rights.[/b]
well, I know my school district does have "special education" classrooms. Classrooms where "special education" students, those with various disabilities ARE grouped together. [i]Segregated from the "non-disabled" population[/i].
It's pretty common practice, yes? I mean, some parents of "non-disabled" children are downright [i]peeved[/i] when "special education" students show up in *their* child's classroom.
Don't know if I'm going to bring up the whole idea of "gifted" classroom groupings, (whoops, just did) or [i]segregating[/i] childrens' classes based on [i]ability[/i], [b]giftedness[/b], or problem areas, but isn't it the [i]trend[/i] nowadays?
Interesting discussion I'm watching. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
At least from my perspective.
I'm not saying you agree with this type of segregation, debbie1, just taking the moment to express something that came to mind. I mean, noting that in many cases, I think [i]segregation[/i] might just be seen as the *norm*. And without many people objecting. KWIM?
General Disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form. Just describing my own personal, highly individual, and possibly unique perspective.

Posted on: Fri, 01/27/2006 - 4:43am
margaret's picture
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Joined: 11/01/2000 - 09:00

I just wanted to mention that my DD's school has put all of the allergy kids in one classroom this year:
Here is the run down of allergies:
Peanuts, Dairy, and Latex
Peanuts and Soy
Walnuts and Hazelnuts
Peanuts and ????
Celiac Disease
I think that they have put the kids all together this year for mostly good reasons. It is comforting for DD to know that she is not the only one with special dietary needs. DD's teacher is also super organized and careful and so she just naturally is a good teacher for all of the kids with allergies. These children are NOT segregated from the rest of the school at all. I am not sure if I would like them to be all together every year, but it seems ok right now while they are little, especially if there is one teacher who is just really up to the task of helping to manage the allergy better than any other teacher in that grade.
Margaret

Posted on: Fri, 01/27/2006 - 6:12am
ZeniaD's picture
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Joined: 01/26/2006 - 09:00

[quote]Originally posted by MommaBear:
[B] well, I know my school district does have "special education" classrooms. Classrooms where "special education" students, those with various disabilities ARE grouped together. [i]Segregated from the "non-disabled" population[/i].
That's the really funny part - the "disabled" kids are all fully intergrated into the classroom, in my daughters class in the last 4 years there have 6 kids with hearing loss (including 3 with cochliar implants), two kids with wheel chairs and one whose autism is so severe, he spent most of the day every day rocking back and forth crying or screaming and hitting other children.

Posted on: Fri, 01/27/2006 - 6:22am
ZeniaD's picture
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Joined: 01/26/2006 - 09:00

If (God forbid) an allergin was somehow introduced into the classroom and all the PA kids started reacting at once, how would they handle it?
That was my first reaction - if somehow one kid was exposed in that class - wouldn't it be likely that a child with the same alergies in that class would have a reaction at the same time? Then what? The procedure for this school is that they won't allow the teachers to keep the epi-pens in their desks ( no locking desks or cabinets you see -dumb reason but they are firm) so they have to intercom the nurse - the nurse runs the epi-pen or other medication to the classroom. My question was what happens if in the time it takes the nurse to get to the classroom ( it is a big school) another child starts reacting - now you have an empty nurse's office- and a teacher who can't leave the first student and so the second child would have to wait for the nurse to go back downstairs (with the key to the drug cabinet) and get that child's medication. The answer I got was "That would never happen because we work very hard to make sure that nothing comes in contact with the children in the first place." As someone who has lived for teh last 10 years with the knowledge that the wrong kind of gum or a soda that is accidentally diet can send me into anaphalaxis, I just don't buy it.
I'm sure they are very careful (about PB anyway)- but it just sounds like a recipe for disaster to me.

Posted on: Fri, 01/27/2006 - 7:28am
gotmilk's picture
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Joined: 01/05/2006 - 09:00

well...what about the "PEANUT FREE" table?! I thought a peanut free table was a good thing. We want our PA children segregated at lunch, but not in the classroom? Im not a lawyer, but I would have to ask what exactly is it that PA advocates want?

Posted on: Fri, 01/27/2006 - 8:35am
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by ZeniaD:
[b]That's the really funny part - the "disabled" kids are all fully intergrated into the classroom, in my daughters class in the last 4 years there have 6 kids with hearing loss (including 3 with cochliar implants), two kids with wheel chairs and one whose autism is so severe, he spent most of the day every day rocking back and forth crying or screaming and hitting other children.
[/b]
what's "funny" about it?
BTW, both my children are on the Autism spectrum. They don't hit other children or scream but occassionally, my oldest will be reduced to tears by the callousness of others. He spends part of his day in a special education classroom, and part mainstreamed.
Their teachers describe them with only admiration. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] My oldest is often called "a good example for his peers" [i]including "normal" classmates. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] (Just had an IEP meeting and re-evaluation for my oldest). I've posted some recent comments about my youngest and oldest here on the boards. In order to adapt to others learning styles, (the apparent mandate of some "regular education" classrooms), and as part of his OHI designation for food allergies, he has a 1:1 aide. He does a lot of accommodating for others, even at age 10.
One of the issues we addressed was the apparent attention (good) he draws from adults. I mean, they gravitate to him.
No advice, just me.

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