Schools with no full-time nurses?

Posted on: Mon, 03/19/2007 - 4:49am
PennMom's picture
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Joined: 08/01/2006 - 09:00

Ok..I'm just researching schools/kindergarten. Is it common for a public school (elementary and kindergarten) to only have a school nurse there 3 days a week and have a "medication aide" or the secretary there the other days?

Apparently our state does not allow self carried epi's (at least I'm assuming by some things I have read- its Pennyslvania)- the epi's are kept in the nurses's office. I can't believe their system seems so "behind" when there are several kids at the school with nut allergies! Oh yeah, and this is the same school that is serving PB once a week- with children at the school with nut allergies- at the very least you think they would want a nurse there full-time! UGH! Sorry had to vent a little!

Posted on: Mon, 03/19/2007 - 6:10am
safetyfirst's picture
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Joined: 09/21/2005 - 09:00

I live in Indiana. Our elementary only has a part time nurse there as well. She is there on M-W and sometimes Friday. Our staff is trained so well I feel pretty comfortable. What scares me more is the fact our local Volunteer Fire dept. doesn't have paramedics. We are 30+ minutes away from the hospital! Whe the school has had to call an ambulance in the past it took over 25 minutes for the LOCAL guys to show up.
Good luck!

Posted on: Mon, 03/19/2007 - 7:33am
NicoleinNH's picture
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Joined: 06/21/2003 - 09:00

ed
[This message has been edited by NicoleinNH (edited June 09, 2007).]

Posted on: Mon, 03/19/2007 - 9:30am
chanda4's picture
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Joined: 12/14/2006 - 09:00

we don't have a nurse, we have a health aide....BIG difference. She is there full time, but she isn't more qulified then I am(I took First Aide/CPR for childcare, same training). We do have a disrtict nurse, but she comes in on Wed's for 2 hours...that's it!!!
To get around the rule of not allowing them to carry....I got a 504 and put it in there. My meetign is Wed, we'll see if they argue it. I want Jake to be able to carry it(or the teacher carry it) but he not to be expected to self administer, that was fuzzy when I first brought it(principal said if he carries it he has to administer it...NOT TRUE!)
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Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig and EE)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)

Posted on: Mon, 03/19/2007 - 10:25am
jmarcustry's picture
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Joined: 10/09/2000 - 09:00

i live in mass. my dd elementary school had a partime nurse. 3x's a week. now that she is in middle school they have a nurse that is there full time. havent asked yet if she can carry her epi on her, but she does have one at the nurses office.
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silence is golden...duct tape is silver...

Posted on: Mon, 03/19/2007 - 10:32am
ajas_folks's picture
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Joined: 04/28/2000 - 09:00

I will try not to be long, but this isn't a brief saga.
We moved to Georgia last August (2006).
Our son was then 7 & going into 2nd grade. We had ONLY homeschooled up to that point.
Not all schools in our Georgia school district have full time nurses (very few, in fact). We intentionally bought a house zoned for a higher-performing elementary school in our district that also had FULL TIME nurse.
Or so we thought.
Or so the district thought.
Apparently when we were doing our research in the springtime & our house hunting & buying in April & May of 2006, the nurse at particular school was pregnant. And she had told no one. She told them after school let out in May. She was due in Sept & would be returning after maternity leave sometime in November, if I recall. The school district made no attempt to replace her at particular elementary school other than to have 3-day a week, mornings-only part-time nurse from another part of district.
We found this out the day we went to enroll son at this school in August. This was Thursday, if I recall. School was to begin that following Monday.
In Georgia, NO public school teacher is required to administer medication, let alone Epi-pen unless he/she agrees to.
Few teachers at that school wanted to agree to it. (Big surprise.)
We were also facing, simultaneously, getting an immediate 504 designation from the district as they previously refused to work with us prior to this in spring or summer, despite my MULTIPLE, USUALLY POLITE requests to get the ball rolling on that -- won't go into that now -- would start posting words that need to be edited.
So, the school district super told me she could ONLY accomodate our full-day, full-time nurse IF we agreed to send child to completely different school . . . in completely different zone/area . . . in what was & is one of the WORST performing and WORST for behavioral and criminal and violent acts against students in elementary schools in the district. (Edited to add, we knew our never-before-in-classic-school-setting son could NOT make it in this sort of situation for first-time school experience. He needed small classes with few discipline issues. Because he has his own discipline -- or lack therof -- issues.)
THAT was how they were going to agree to accommodate our 504 need for full-day nurse to be able to administer life-saving Epi-pen in event of ana-reaction.
The following day we found a private school for our son. They had 1 opening left in 2nd grade. Apparently, we wished on a lucky star that night too. They had JUST learned of younger student they had admitted who had PA & they were doing staff-crash-course on PA. The 2nd grade teacher our son got happens to be PA herself. She has grandchild with PA. She has ZERO problems with administering Epipen. Many of the staff are trained on Epipen. THERE IS NO SCHOOL NURSE. School is 7 minutes from our home and 2 minutes from a hospital.
We are near-broke from private school tuition. My son adores his teacher & school. Certainly, it has been a learning process for us all. It hasn't been perfect, but it has worked for us, and most importantly, he has been reaction-free this year, due in no small part to the school taking the PA seriously.
And we live in peanut central, USA.
I said this would be long. Sorry.
We move again this summer, I think. Joy & rapture, we have to go thru it all again. Who knows what state, district, or ridiculously camoflaged situation we will encounter this time.
I grew up in an elementary school with full-time nurse. (Reno, Nevada 1960's * 1970's.) I personally feel there should be full-time nurse at every school in this country. How to pay for it is entirely another question.
~~~~
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~Eli[b]Z[/b]abeth,
Mother to 2:
DD age 5, NKA, treated as though PA/TNA
DS age 8, PA, possible TNA, Latex, legumes?
(PA diagnosed & ana reaction 1999)
Member here since 2000
[This message has been edited by ajas_folks (edited March 22, 2007).]

Posted on: Mon, 03/19/2007 - 12:10pm
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

we are in public school. Our district has three elementary schools and one high school...one RN for all four locations. She spends one day at each school...it sucks.
We have a "health clerk" at our school who administers meds.
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mom to Ari(6) - severe nut allergies, asthma, you name it - and Maya (9), mild excema

Posted on: Mon, 03/19/2007 - 12:57pm
Jana R's picture
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Joined: 02/09/1999 - 09:00

check out:
[url="http://www.aanma.org/cityhall/ch_childrights.htm"]http://www.aanma.org/cityhall/ch_childrights.htm[/url]
Pennsylvania is a light blue state which means asthma meds can be carried - I think you can contact AANMA to see if anyone is coordinating efforts to add anaphylaxis meds to their current law.
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Jana
[url="http://www.seattlefoodallergy.org"]www.seattlefoodallergy.org[/url]

Posted on: Mon, 03/19/2007 - 1:22pm
PennMom's picture
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Joined: 08/01/2006 - 09:00

Thanks so much for all the help!

Posted on: Mon, 03/19/2007 - 2:27pm
chanda4's picture
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Joined: 12/14/2006 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by Jana R:
[b]check out:
[url="http://www.aanma.org/cityhall/ch_childrights.htm"]http://www.aanma.org/cityhall/ch_childrights.htm[/url]
Pennsylvania is a light blue state which means asthma meds can be carried - I think you can contact AANMA to see if anyone is coordinating efforts to add anaphylaxis meds to their current law.
[/b]
ohhh, thanks Jana, I needed that site, I printed the map!!
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Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig and EE)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)

Posted on: Mon, 03/19/2007 - 3:56pm
solarflare's picture
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Joined: 02/07/2002 - 09:00

You know, my oldest has been going to his school for 5 years, and I've never once seen the nurse on campus.
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Cheryl, mom to Jason (9 MFA including peanuts, tree nuts, shellfish and egg)
Joey (7 NKA)
Allison (4 milk allergic, suspect shellfish, avoiding PN/TN for now)
Ryan (1) nka *knock on wood*

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