School switches from Peanut Butter to Sun Butter

Posted on: Wed, 08/30/2006 - 10:57pm
PeteFerraro's picture
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Joined: 07/10/2001 - 09:00

I am pleased to report that the school that my PA son attends will quit serving peanut butter sandwiches in their lunch program.

They are switching from peanut butter to sunbutter.

------------------
Pete Ferraro
[url="http://www.FerraroFamily.org"]http://www.FerraroFamily.org[/url]

Posted on: Wed, 08/30/2006 - 11:37pm
April in KC's picture
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Joined: 08/28/2006 - 09:00

Fantastic! My child's kindergarten made the switch a few weeks ago, too, and they allowed us to serve some SB treats to parents at a meeting to increase awareness of an alternative.
It definitely helps that SB is on the FDA subsidized foods list that the school can get for pennies on the dollar. It costs the same to schools as PB.
April

Posted on: Thu, 08/31/2006 - 12:17am
jtolpin's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2003 - 09:00

I our school does NOT serve ANY foods with peanuts/nuts in it. I may be wrong, but I remember seeing that in the emergency plan the school committee put in place.
(FWIW: Caitlin, of course, does NOT buy lunch) [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Jason
------------------
[b]* Obsessed * [/b]

Posted on: Thu, 08/31/2006 - 12:58pm
luvmyboys's picture
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Joined: 05/25/2006 - 09:00

My school still serves peanut butter. I would love to see them switch, but how do you encourage it gently? And who do you approach? Luvmyboys

Posted on: Thu, 08/31/2006 - 9:45pm
PeteFerraro's picture
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Joined: 07/10/2001 - 09:00

I would approach the school nurse and/or the principal.
Maybe bring a sunbutter snack in as a treat for the class?

Posted on: Thu, 08/31/2006 - 11:15pm
jtolpin's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2003 - 09:00

I dont know HOW or WHY our school doesn't serve it... If I asked the school committee/principal, I'd find out my answer...
Jason
------------------
[b]* Obsessed * [/b]

Posted on: Thu, 08/31/2006 - 11:18pm
krc's picture
krc
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Joined: 01/16/2007 - 09:00

our SD switched from the messy pb sand to uncrustables but i would still love to see them switch.

Posted on: Fri, 09/01/2006 - 12:23pm
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Quote:Originally posted by luvmyboys:
[b]My school still serves peanut butter. I would love to see them switch, but how do you encourage it gently? And who do you approach? Luvmyboys[/b]
This is what I did....
After repeatedly requesting my son's SD make the switch, and repeatedly being told "no" because pb was a "free protein", I went above them. Since I was getting NO WHERE with my local school district, I approached the state and requested that they offer SunButter as a govt commodity to their schools. I contacted the Food Service Director for my state education department. (In my case, Missouri Dept of Elementary and Secondary Education.) USDA offers it as a commodity, but each state must request to receive it from the feds. In my case, the state level was MUCH more receptive to the idea of making things safer for children, and picked it up as a commodity. Then [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/cool.gif[/img] I provided my son's school district with the e-mail (written communication is always a good thing)from the state agreeing to offer it on the local level along with ANOTHER request that the district replace pb with SunButter. With it now being "free protein" too.....rock and a hard place for the SD. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] SunButter is now served!
So, start by finding out if SunButter is offered by your state. (Check your dept of education's website. I know that I can see Missouri's commodities list on line.) If it isn't offered by your state, it may be because no one has requested that they get it from the feds.

Posted on: Fri, 09/01/2006 - 5:16pm
gvmom's picture
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Joined: 08/24/2005 - 09:00

I actually just checked to see if my state has the Sunbutter available as a commodity. I think that it actually does -- my question is that it is listed under Miscellaneous Products as Sunflower Butter. How do I find out if this Sunflower butter is actually Sunbutter, and which form it comes in (since they have various varieties?)?

Posted on: Fri, 09/01/2006 - 9:55pm
luvmyboys's picture
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Joined: 05/25/2006 - 09:00

I am pretty sure it is offered in my state because a neighboring, financially strapped district uses it. I figured food services is probably a school district wide issue. Drew's mom, who did you contact...head of food services? the superintendent?
I'm not really sure how to argue for this since I don't know how much of a danger pb&j in the cafeteria will pose for my son next year. Daily PB&J is the only 'glaring' issue in our otherwise wonderful 504 plan. I don't know how many they even sell on a given day. It would just be nice...less residue on the playground...Luvmyboys

Posted on: Tue, 09/05/2006 - 8:59am
momasita's picture
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Joined: 12/05/2004 - 09:00

Our school serves soybutter instead of peanutbutter. It only cost a few pennies more and can be purchased in bulk from the same place they get other foods (I think its sysco). Just becareful of kids with soy or sunflower allergies.

Posted on: Wed, 09/06/2006 - 7:23am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Quote:Originally posted by luvmyboys:
[b]Drew's mom, who did you contact...head of food services? the superintendent?
[/b]
We started with the building principal and climbed up the ladder (all the way to the school board). *IF* you have a reasonable school district, where employees are allowed to perform the duties they were hired to do, then I would start with the Director of Food Services. If your district is like ours and the Superintendent calls ALL the shots, I wouldn't waste the time, energy, ink and effort and I would go directly to him/her.
(I've talked to a school nurse from a neighboring school district who told me that parents didn't even have to get involved with the removal of pb from their district. The nurses got together, discussed that pb on trays was a risk that caused stress they didn't need/want, and they went directly to Food Services and strongly requested that pb be removed...and it was. Wouldn't it be nice if it was always that simple?)

Posted on: Wed, 08/30/2006 - 11:37pm
April in KC's picture
Offline
Joined: 08/28/2006 - 09:00

Fantastic! My child's kindergarten made the switch a few weeks ago, too, and they allowed us to serve some SB treats to parents at a meeting to increase awareness of an alternative.
It definitely helps that SB is on the FDA subsidized foods list that the school can get for pennies on the dollar. It costs the same to schools as PB.
April

Posted on: Thu, 08/31/2006 - 12:17am
jtolpin's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2003 - 09:00

I our school does NOT serve ANY foods with peanuts/nuts in it. I may be wrong, but I remember seeing that in the emergency plan the school committee put in place.
(FWIW: Caitlin, of course, does NOT buy lunch) [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Jason
------------------
[b]* Obsessed * [/b]

Posted on: Thu, 08/31/2006 - 12:58pm
luvmyboys's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/25/2006 - 09:00

My school still serves peanut butter. I would love to see them switch, but how do you encourage it gently? And who do you approach? Luvmyboys

Posted on: Thu, 08/31/2006 - 9:45pm
PeteFerraro's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/10/2001 - 09:00

I would approach the school nurse and/or the principal.
Maybe bring a sunbutter snack in as a treat for the class?

Posted on: Thu, 08/31/2006 - 11:15pm
jtolpin's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2003 - 09:00

I dont know HOW or WHY our school doesn't serve it... If I asked the school committee/principal, I'd find out my answer...
Jason
------------------
[b]* Obsessed * [/b]

Posted on: Thu, 08/31/2006 - 11:18pm
krc's picture
krc
Offline
Joined: 01/16/2007 - 09:00

our SD switched from the messy pb sand to uncrustables but i would still love to see them switch.

Posted on: Fri, 09/01/2006 - 12:23pm
anonymous's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Quote:Originally posted by luvmyboys:
[b]My school still serves peanut butter. I would love to see them switch, but how do you encourage it gently? And who do you approach? Luvmyboys[/b]
This is what I did....
After repeatedly requesting my son's SD make the switch, and repeatedly being told "no" because pb was a "free protein", I went above them. Since I was getting NO WHERE with my local school district, I approached the state and requested that they offer SunButter as a govt commodity to their schools. I contacted the Food Service Director for my state education department. (In my case, Missouri Dept of Elementary and Secondary Education.) USDA offers it as a commodity, but each state must request to receive it from the feds. In my case, the state level was MUCH more receptive to the idea of making things safer for children, and picked it up as a commodity. Then [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/cool.gif[/img] I provided my son's school district with the e-mail (written communication is always a good thing)from the state agreeing to offer it on the local level along with ANOTHER request that the district replace pb with SunButter. With it now being "free protein" too.....rock and a hard place for the SD. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] SunButter is now served!
So, start by finding out if SunButter is offered by your state. (Check your dept of education's website. I know that I can see Missouri's commodities list on line.) If it isn't offered by your state, it may be because no one has requested that they get it from the feds.

Posted on: Fri, 09/01/2006 - 5:16pm
gvmom's picture
Offline
Joined: 08/24/2005 - 09:00

I actually just checked to see if my state has the Sunbutter available as a commodity. I think that it actually does -- my question is that it is listed under Miscellaneous Products as Sunflower Butter. How do I find out if this Sunflower butter is actually Sunbutter, and which form it comes in (since they have various varieties?)?

Posted on: Fri, 09/01/2006 - 9:55pm
luvmyboys's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/25/2006 - 09:00

I am pretty sure it is offered in my state because a neighboring, financially strapped district uses it. I figured food services is probably a school district wide issue. Drew's mom, who did you contact...head of food services? the superintendent?
I'm not really sure how to argue for this since I don't know how much of a danger pb&j in the cafeteria will pose for my son next year. Daily PB&J is the only 'glaring' issue in our otherwise wonderful 504 plan. I don't know how many they even sell on a given day. It would just be nice...less residue on the playground...Luvmyboys

Posted on: Tue, 09/05/2006 - 8:59am
momasita's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/05/2004 - 09:00

Our school serves soybutter instead of peanutbutter. It only cost a few pennies more and can be purchased in bulk from the same place they get other foods (I think its sysco). Just becareful of kids with soy or sunflower allergies.

Posted on: Wed, 09/06/2006 - 7:23am
anonymous's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Quote:Originally posted by luvmyboys:
[b]Drew's mom, who did you contact...head of food services? the superintendent?
[/b]
We started with the building principal and climbed up the ladder (all the way to the school board). *IF* you have a reasonable school district, where employees are allowed to perform the duties they were hired to do, then I would start with the Director of Food Services. If your district is like ours and the Superintendent calls ALL the shots, I wouldn't waste the time, energy, ink and effort and I would go directly to him/her.
(I've talked to a school nurse from a neighboring school district who told me that parents didn't even have to get involved with the removal of pb from their district. The nurses got together, discussed that pb on trays was a risk that caused stress they didn't need/want, and they went directly to Food Services and strongly requested that pb be removed...and it was. Wouldn't it be nice if it was always that simple?)

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