School Board Policy allowing carrying/self-administration of Epi-Pen

Author:
Updated:
Original:

Last month our School Board passed the following policy regarding epi-pens. This section below called "Administering Medications to Students With Known Allergic Reactions" is now included as a sub-section in a broader policy about administering medications to students.

I thought I'd post this in case anyone else is looking for such policies... maybe to show their School Districts in the absence of one. I'm also very interested in learning what you all think. Is there anything missing here?

[i][b]Administering Medication to Students With Known Allergic Reactions[/b]

1. Medication provided by the parent/guardian will be stored in the nurses' offices for the affected student.

2. The medication must be prescribed by a physician and accompanied by written permission from the parent and a written order from the physician.

3. The medication and permission form must be updated at the beginning of each school year and any time the medication or dosage is changed.

4. The medication will be administered by the school nurse or a staff member who has been trained to give this particular kind of emergency injection.

5. All staff will be trained in the administration of Epi-Pens.

6. Pupils whose Individualized Health Care Plan (IHP) indicates the possible administration of an Epi-Pen may carry the Epi-Pen if the IHP planning team determines that they are cognitively and behaviorally able to do so. The IHP team must include the parents/guardians. Information regarding whether and where a pupil will be carrying an Epi-Pen will be documented in the pupil

On Nov 1, 2005

What about students who are too young to carry and/or self-administer epipen? Their epipens must be in the office? Is there some provision to allow rescue medications to be kept in the classroom in such cases?

Cathy

------------------ Mom to 6 yr old PA/TNA daughter and 2 1/2 yr old son who is allergic to eggs.

On Nov 1, 2005

Otherwise, I think this looks really good. Especially the part about all staff being trained to administer epipen!

Cathy

On Nov 1, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by Momcat: [b]What about students who are too young to carry and/or self-administer epipen? Their epipens must be in the office? Is there some provision to allow rescue medications to be kept in the classroom in such cases?[/b]

Yes! I agree: The wording isn't clear that epi-pens are allowed in the classroom (w/ teacher) also.

[This message has been edited by Gail W (edited November 01, 2005).]

On Nov 1, 2005

I'm really interested in this because I have volunteered for my district's Medical Advisory Steering Committee. We are supposed to survey parents and staff to find out what's working and not working with current district policies on administering medication at school, collect best practices and make recommendations to the school board. I am excited that I have a chance to suggest that they adopt a district policy on anaphylaxis management! Who knows what the board will do, though.

Anyway, Gail, you have made such a difference in your district! Whatever information you have on this topic would be welcome.

Thanks for posting this new policy.

Cathy

On Nov 1, 2005

Cathy,

That's very exciting. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] It will be interesting to learn from you about what you find out from looking at different School Board policies re: epi. And I think the whole process itself will be interesting. I hope you will post [i]lots [/i]about it all.

I've been thinking about the classroom epi's this since you posted. I know that the school district allows epi-pens to be in classrooms because my DD has always had them in multiple classrooms every year. This year, her first year at Middle School, there is one in each of her 8 classrooms. But all those 8, plus the 5 more in trauma kits located through out the building, plus several in the Nurses' office [i]are all provided by the School District.[/i] The only epi-pens that I provide are the 3 that she carries herself (in her lunch box, in her back pack, and in her school binder).

So, I'm wondering since they DO have them in classroom and this isn't reflected in the policy if that is because they are distinguishing between epi-pens that are supplied by the SD and those that are supplied by the parent. If you read the policy, it refers only to epi-pens/medication "provided by the parent/guardian..." But it doesn't specifically state that epi located in the classroom will be provided by the School District, though this is their current [i] practice [/i].

I'll send an e-mail to our SI and ask what the thinking was on this. I'll post her response.

On Nov 2, 2005

There doesn't seem to be any language about the school incurring no liability if they fail to administer an epi-pen to a student that doesn't carry. That's a good thing. I'd never sign such a document. People have been sued for not helping at the scene of car accidents. Failure to act is no excuse.

On Nov 2, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by Gail W: [b]8. The district and its employees or agents shall incur no liability as a result of any injury arising from the self-administration of an Epi-Pen by the pupil, absent any negligence by the district, its employees or its agents, or as a result of providing all relevant information provided pursuant to subdivisions (1) through (6) of this subsection with the school nurse, absent any negligence by the district, its employees or its agents, or in the absence of such nurse, to the school administrator;[/b]

Can someone translate please? What does this mean? Especially the phrase [i]"...or in the absence of such nurse, to the school administrator..."[/i]

Every school in our district has at least one full-time RN. Trying to connect "absence of such nurse" to the meaning of this point...

On Nov 2, 2005

Maybe this clause is to cover them in case the parents or doctors provide wrong information?

It seems to be saying that the district won't be liable as a result of providing this medical information to the nurse, or if there is no nurse, to the "school administrator" (principal?).

Is there some privacy issue?

I agree, it's as clear as mud!

Cathy

On Nov 2, 2005

Here is the question I sent by e-mail:

[i]"As I read the policy, Epi-pens provided by parent can be 1.) carried by the student (under certain stipulations), or 2.) housed in the Nurses' Office. I'm thinking about students who do not carry their own Epi-pens and have them in their classrooms for immediate access. The policy does not seem to allow parent-provided Epi-pens in the child's classroom ...? Is that because the School District will provide Epi-pen(s) in the classroom(s)? Is this policy distinguishing between Epi-pens that the parent provides and those that are provided by the School District? "[/i]

Here is her response by e-mail: [i]"We plan to provide Epi-Pens in the schools as needed for the students. The parent provided EpiPens are backups, part of teaching the student to manage their allergy, and a way to have an EpiPen available for the student between school and home/after school destination as needed. [/i]

I also checked with an acquaintance of mine (an attorney) who is on the School Board. I asked her if the policy statement, [i]"Medication provided by the parent/guardian will be stored in the nurses' offices for the affected student." [/i] could excluded medication from being located in the classroom. Her answer was, "No. Medication [i]will [/i]be kept in the Nurses' Office, and that doesn't prohibit that it may also be kept in the classroom or other places in the building."

Okay. I like. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

[This message has been edited by Gail W (edited November 02, 2005).]

On Nov 2, 2005

Wow, Gail! They PROVIDE epipens! That is wonderful! I am currently working to get our school to provide epipens. Here are the roadblocks:

1. The school does not have a district physician to prescribe the epipens.

2. The school has a nurse there only one day per week. So who will "diagnose" anaphylaxis?

3. How will we pay for the epipens?

Do you have any information on how your school is funding the epipens? Do they have a grant or a discount or something?

Cathy

On Nov 2, 2005

Cathy,

This (epi provided by SD, physician consultant, full-time RNs) all pre-existed our arrival in the School District... and were big considerations in our decision to buy a house in this School District.

To my knowledge, our SD has always had a consulting physician, a [i]board certified pediatrician[/i], on retainer.

Our School District has always had a least one (last year two) full-time School Nurses (RNs) in every school. And epi-pens are "standard" on the School Nurses' "supply list", funded by the School District.

I'm lucky. It was very calculated, but I'm lucky nonetheless. Very lucky.

I'll look into the funding issues for you and get back here with that information.

[This message has been edited by Gail W (edited November 02, 2005).]

Related