RAST testing and \"low level\" allergy?

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My son was diagnosed with PA when he was 18 months and we have done the label reading, cautioned family and friends, carry an epi-pen. Before he was diagnosed he would eat PBJ sandwiches and get a small rash (spots) around the area of his mouth, that's been the extent of his reaction. Recently he had a blood test performed (RAST) and they tell me it is a "low-level" allergy. Does anyone have experience with this? Our allergist wanted a CAP RAST done, but our insurance wouldn't cover it. He will be going off to nursery school in September and I am starting to worry about him being outside my supervision. I was wondering what others know about the testing and if in fact one can have a "low level" allergy.

On Mar 15, 2000

See the "thread" on the Main Discussion Board titled "Does anyone know when to use a RAST vs. skin test" (or something to that affect).

On Mar 16, 2000

My 2 year old daughter was diagnosed as PA when she was 15 months old. After giving her a small piece of her sister's PBJ sandwich, she immediately swelled up, started vomiting profusely, had a drop in blood pressure, and eventually was hospitalized and required 5 epi-pen shots over the next 8 hours. We had skin testing done, and about six months after that, we went to see Dr. Sampson in NYC. She did the RAST test, and she only scored a .85, which is low-level allergic. However, the way he explained this, that does not mean she will not react voilently to ingestion. This score is the result of a scale that her immune system responds to. Our insurance did not pay for this either, but the piece of mind of having more definite information is well-worth it. I suggest you go ahead with a reputable allergist and do the RAST test. Good luck. Michele

On Apr 28, 2000

Just started getting itchy mouth, legs, eyes and face afer eating almonds, then penuts. I've never been one to eat much of either one til now, I'm on protein diet. What causes this all of the sudden? What's in these nuts to cause this reaction? Can someone tell me?

On Apr 28, 2000

Not to be an alarmist, but it could be the start of a very serious reaction. Call your doctor or have someone drive you to the emergency room. It could get better or, if you're like my daughter, you may be anaphylactic to peanut and/or nuts which is life-threatening if not treated - you could start have difficulty breathing/blood pressure may suddenly drop. Take this reaction seriously and do something now.

On Apr 29, 2000

My daughter started nursery school n the middle of the year, just about the time I learned that she had a "deathly allergy to peanuts". My allergist told me at that time that if my daughter did not develop any other allergies, did not develop asthma, and did not develop exema, that it might be possible for her to become less allergic to peanuts and that her reactions could become less life threatening. Perhaps this is what your doctor was referring to.

My daughter had a very successful time at preschool, the staff was great and very contientious. Her Epi was in her bag in her cubby and the two teachers knew about it. There was a sign up in the classroom snack cabinet about her and what not to give her.

Hope this eases your mind a bit.

On Sep 21, 2000

We have just had it confirmed that our 4yr old son is allergic to peanuts.He had a skin test done and our Dr said that we cannot find out from a skin test how severe his allergy is and that every peanut allergy should be treated as potentially fatal as each reaction can be different. I would like to know what a RAST test is, can it give me an idea of level of severity even though I understand that I should not rely on this.He also said that a child cannot have an anaphylatic reaction from the smell alone--has anyone else heard this?--carolyn

On Sep 21, 2000

Our allergist told us that the CAP RAST test (a blood test) would give us an indication to the severity of our son's allergy. Unfortunately our ins. co. wouldn't cover it. The allergist is going to have the blood test done anyway in a few months and petition the ins. co. to pay for it. We received the same advice, to treat the allergy as if it were life threatening, at least until we know more. We were told that a severe allergy, such as smelling the peanut product could cause a reaction, but that it's very rare. Good luck to you and your son.

Quote:

Originally posted by care: [b]We have just had it confirmed that our 4yr old son is allergic to peanuts.He had a skin test done and our Dr said that we cannot find out from a skin test how severe his allergy is and that every peanut allergy should be treated as potentially fatal as each reaction can be different. I would like to know what a RAST test is, can it give me an idea of level of severity even though I understand that I should not rely on this.He also said that a child cannot have an anaphylatic reaction from the smell alone--has anyone else heard this?--carolyn[/b]

On Sep 21, 2000

Does anyone know what the cost of the CAP RAST test is that supposedly the insurance won't cover. Expensive is relative when talking about a life-threatening allergy...

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