Quick Reaction Poll

Posted on: Mon, 04/05/2004 - 5:52am
jennk1's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/31/2004 - 09:00

I just want to do a quick survey so I can be more aware of what to watch out for and be prepared for:

1. What were your (or your child's) last reactions caused by? (i.e. cross contamination @ restaurant, trace amounts in packaged crackers, etc.)
2. What were the symptoms of the reactions?
(i.e. breathing trouble, hives, etc.)

Here are my answers:

1. peanut butter on toast (didn't know he was allergic yet)
2. hives on face and eyes swelling.

Thanks for your help.

Jennifer

Posted on: Mon, 04/05/2004 - 7:18am
California Mom's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/14/2000 - 09:00

Last reaction, 8 months ago:
my (then) eight year old reacted to a brownie made from a Ghirardelli mix that was produced on the same line as a nut containing variety. (She is tna and pa.) She felt very nauseous and threw up within about 1/2 an hour.
Miriam

Posted on: Mon, 04/05/2004 - 7:39am
erik's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/15/2001 - 09:00

1) my last ingestion reaction was due to a piece of marzipan on top of a birthday cake (in the early 1980s)
2) roof of mouth was incredibly itchy immediately... followed by major hives.. followed by nausea several hours later

Posted on: Mon, 04/05/2004 - 11:29am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Last reaction, a year ago December, at the age of 7. Anaphylactic. To residue which he touched his hands to and either then touched his mouth or nose and it entered his body.
Difficulty breathing (asked for his asthma puffers), threw up, large hives on his face and some facial swelling, then hives all over his body.
It was his fifth reaction, third anaphylactic one.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------

Posted on: Mon, 04/05/2004 - 11:52pm
katiee's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/09/2001 - 09:00

Wade's last serious reaction was May 2002. We believe it was an airborne reaction to heated Asian appetizers served before the reception (we thought it was the french fries he ate from a meal we brought with us, it was tested and no trace of peanut found).
Symptoms: itchy mouth and throat, panic, vomitting (huge amount), loss of consciousness. Absolutely no hives. Scarry. Treated with epipen and Benadryl with further treatment in hospital ER.
He had another minor airborne reaction last year at a loccal park from the smell of a peanut butter sandw. He had no idea he was near one either.
Symptoms: Serious asthma attack, fortunately, after taking him away from the area it got better and only required Benadryl and ventolin.
Take care,
katiee

Posted on: Tue, 04/06/2004 - 2:26am
Peg541's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/29/2002 - 09:00

DS last reaction was Halloween 2002.
Airborne. His calculus teacher handed out Reeses candies to the class before his. When DS got into the room he did not smell peanuts but his airway got swollen almost immediately.
He used his epi pen, took a Benadryl and called me. I took him to the ER where they ignored us for four hours.
In retrospect I THINK we over-reacted. I think leaving the room, taking a Benadryl and coming home would have been enough.
I bullied the ER doc into a Medrol dose pack (7 days of steroids) and that made DS so sick.
I am not willing to wait-and-see and taught DS that also but looking at the exposure and how long it lasted and how quickly he left the room I really think he could have done fine without the epi and the ER.
We/He learned. That's all that matters right now.
Peggy

Posted on: Tue, 04/06/2004 - 3:53am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Last reaction I remember having was June 2003. (Might have had one more recent - I tell ya, my brain is fried. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/redface.gif[/img] )
Anyway, the reaction last June was to a smudge of *may contain* food that was on my coffee cup (at my own home).
I had stomach cramps, hives, itchy gums, and (I think my nose felt swollen inside). Took benedryl, the symptoms cleared, then about a half-hour later I took a deep breath, and suddenly realized I hadn't been able to. After that, I was hoarse.
***************
Erik, you said your last *ingestion reaction* was in 1980. Have you had any reactions since then?

Posted on: Tue, 04/06/2004 - 4:58am
pgrubbs's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/27/2003 - 09:00

Before we had a PA dx- chinese food- nothing with peanuts or peanut oil at the table so probably cross contamination. She had eaten Chinese a million times before.
Lips swollen, asthma attack, vomiting...since 3 body sstems should have used epi and gone ER but did not know...
Paula

Posted on: Tue, 04/06/2004 - 6:00am
attlun's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/13/2003 - 09:00

Trevor's last reaction was about a month or two ago, we assume must have been from residue of some sort at chuckie cheese. Hives only. Gave Benadryl.
Last serious reaction before that was anaphylactic, hives, throat swelling, coughing, etc. to a bite of oatmeal cookie with pb in it.
Used epi, further treatment at ER. That was June of 2003.
------------------
Tina
Trevor age 2 -PA
Harmony age 1 -KNA
It's a BOY!!! due June 24, 2004

Posted on: Tue, 04/06/2004 - 10:47am
CVRTBB's picture
Offline
Joined: 11/23/2001 - 09:00

Timmy's last reaction was just a week and a half ago. We made 2 trips to the E.R. that week from the same source. Residue from a bunch of children's hands who had eaten Reese's cups at a basketball game got all over some basketball's and Timmy played with one on Saturday... first trip to the ER. Then on Wednesday night during church the kids played in the gym with the same basketball's and Timmy "forgot" that I told him not to play with them [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img] Second trip to the ER. With both reactions he had an asthma attack, his lips and mouth swelled slightly and he was very panicky. Both times I gave him benedryl and took him to the ER but did not give epi because he didn't seem to be having as difficult time of breathing as he seemed to think... I think it was more panic on his part. His sats were 97 so his airways were definately not closed off. The first trip to the ER ended with us leaving after a breathing treatment and the Dr not being able to re-examine him because he forgot and ate a huge handful of peanuts! (He realized what he did and would not come back into the room- talked to me from the hall and had the nurse reprint all the discharge papers because he had touched the first ones... all this scared the daylights out of me!)
Anyway... thats the last reaction.
Valerie

Posted on: Wed, 04/07/2004 - 9:34am
jennk1's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/31/2004 - 09:00

Wow, thanks for all the responses. I'm shocked at how many reactions were caused cross contamination in unusual ways. I wouldn't have thought to worry about my son having a reaction to peanut residue on tables and play equipment. Yikes. I wonder how common it is to have such strong reactions to trace amounts... Sometimes I wonder if the typical member of this website has more severe allergies than the "average" PA person? Maybe not, now I'm starting to freak out!
I'd like to hear more reaction stories if you have time.
Thanks, Jennifer

Pages

Peanut Free and Nut Free Community

Click on one of the categories below to see all topics and discussions.

Latest Discussions

Latest Post by Sarah McKenzie Fri, 05/22/2020 - 12:57pm
Comments: 6
Latest Post by JRM20 Wed, 05/20/2020 - 9:30am
Comments: 5
Latest Post by justme Mon, 05/18/2020 - 12:36pm
Comments: 45
Latest Post by krisztina Thu, 02/20/2020 - 4:49pm
Comments: 1
Latest Post by chicken Thu, 02/20/2020 - 4:45pm
Comments: 3
Latest Post by lexy Tue, 01/28/2020 - 12:21am
Comments: 6
Latest Post by JRM20 Sun, 01/26/2020 - 11:15am
Comments: 6
Latest Post by Italia38 Wed, 01/15/2020 - 11:03am
Comments: 10

Peanut Free Store

More Articles

It Is Easy To Buy Peanut Free Chocolate Online

Ask any parent of a child with a potentially life-...

Peanuts can cause one of the most serious allergic reactions of all food products. Researchers speculate...

Tree nuts and peanuts are distinctly different. An allergy to one does not guarantee an allergy to the other. Peanuts are considered legumes and...

Whether you have a child with a peanut allergy or you are sensitive to packing a nut-free lunch out of concern for other people’s children, it is...

The most frightening thing about a severe allergic reaction to a new food is that it can happen so fast. If parents are not looking for allergic...

Those with severe peanut allergies soon learn to look for the 'peanut-free sign' on any packaged food purchase. This is a notation found on a wide...

Cakes are a central part of many celebrations, from kids' birthdays to weddings. For those with severe ...

For many people with peanut allergies, baked goods present one of the most significant risks. Even if...

A recent study published in the Journal of American College of Nutrition by Mahnaz Rezaeyan Safar and a number of her colleagues has found some...

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is an overarching term for a number of progressive lung diseases, including emphysema, chronic...

For individuals suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), managing the symptoms and avoiding exacerbations can be a full-time...

Psoriasis is a chronic skin condition that causes itchy patches of inflammation and scale on your skin. The severity of psoriasis symptoms varies...

Kim Kardashian, an immensely famous reality star and the wife of acclaimed rapper Kanye West, has spoken out about her struggle with psoriasis....

Paul Wilson, a long-term marathon runner and asthma sufferer, is urging other people with asthma to support a new campaign aimed at raising...

Psoriasis is a common skin condition that causes a buildup of cells on the skin surface, resulting in dry, red patches on the body and/or face....

Sufferers of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) will tell you that the most difficult symptom to deal with is morning stiffness. With nearly 90 percent of...

Knowing which medication is right for you can often be a confusing and overwhelming process. The specific type of asthma medication you require...

Psoriasis is a chronic autoimmune condition that causes painful scaly patches on the skin. Although psoriasis is a very common skin condition,...

Although there are multiple treatments available for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), those suffering from the condition can still find themselves...

Patients undergoing biologic treatment for psoriasis, a relatively common inflammatory skin condition, have seen a reduction in arterial plaque...