Psychological Disorders as a Disability? Thoughts?

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For starters, does a "psychological disorder" qualify as a "disability" in the "reasonable accommodation" sense? What "accommodations" if any, have you noticed? How are these accommodations, if there be any, recieved/viewed by the public? Yourself?

On Jan 11, 2004

Chrikey, Momma Bear, you're going to drive me insane, which means mentally ill, and from what I can deduce here, I will be disabled! LOL! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]

Could I please have a definition of a psychological disorder?

Could I please have a definition (although this is not part of your question) of a behavioural problem?

My mind is truly boggled, but this one I do need an answer to before I can begin to think of whether or not it is a disability, whatever *it* is.

BTW, it is after January 9th. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]

Many thanks and best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

------------------

On Jan 11, 2004

MommaBear, geez! You are really going to town on these! Are you just going to keep listing them? LOLOLOL....

On Jan 12, 2004

Karen H., that's what I keep thinking too and I don't even know how long the list could possibly become. The thing is though, for the most part, for the people that did answer in these recent threads, it has made for interesting conversation (or am I just saying that because I was in all of the threads? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] - I don't mean that what I had to say was particularly interesting but they were interesting to me and that's why I posted in them).

Then, something will blip into my brain and I'll say, yes, but what does this question have to do with PA or what does it have to do with Living with PA, then remind myself that I am involved in a circular discussion and not one of my yes or no answer questions and keep with it.

I, personally, would like to see how long the list gets.

I still need answers, Momma Bear, before I can answer the question in this thread though.

Did check the OHRC paperwork to-day and couldn't find specific wording re alcoholism/drug addiction but that's because I don't have ALL of their paperwork, only the paperwork that they felt I needed to complete my complaint against the school board district.

Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

------------------

On Jan 12, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by Alternative to Mainstream: [b]

I still need answers, Momma Bear, before I can answer the question in this thread though.

[/b]

*I* am more interested in what *others* percieve it to be, but, I guess I'd have to ask myself:

"Where would I look for an *authorative* definition -- What constitutes an *authoratative* definition?"

I'd also have to ask myself:

"How would such a definition be determined?"

[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]

On Jan 12, 2004

Does the [b]DSM-IV-TR[/b] have any relevance to this discussion?

Anyone?

[This message has been edited by MommaBear (edited January 13, 2004).]

On Jan 17, 2004

If you are referring to mental illness as defined by Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), then yes, legally there are viewed as disabilities and should be treated as such when the law applies.

The 'accommodations' I have known of personally back in the day when I was thinking of being a social worker & volunteered at support groups I knew several people who were

- getting disability payments from Social Security (depression/bi-polar/schizophrenia)

- getting time off from work as per their jobs policy in regards to illnesses (all of the above plus a few people with alcoholism)

I also know a few parents whose kids are getting special counseling/tutoring etc due to ADD.

I have also read about several celebraties who had special accomodations such as a sports figure who always rode in a bus because he had anxiety attackes in airplanes.

In general, the public & bureacrats perceive mental illness is not given the same amount of consideration as other illnesses -- for example, it is often much more difficult to get treatment paid for through insurance. It is also 'shameful' and 'embarassing' to people & their families. & it certainly isn't anything that most people would want their potential employers to know about for fear of discrimination.

My opinion: mental illness is a disease and anyone with a mental illness should be treated the same as any other chronic disease such as diabetes or epilepsy. People should have access to treatment and should not be discriminated against.

Why do you ask?

Quote:

Originally posted by MommaBear: [b]For starters, does a "psychological disorder" qualify as a "disability" in the "reasonable accommodation" sense? What "accommodations" if any, have you noticed? How are these accommodations, if there be any, recieved/viewed by the public? Yourself?[/b]

[This message has been edited by ElleMo (edited January 17, 2004).]

On Jan 17, 2004

Mommbear:

I just noticed your previous thread on "mental illness" and see the same question posed with the "psychological disorder" so I am curious as to your questions -- are you just seeking out people's attitudes in general? Do you perceive a difference between mental illness and psychological disorder?

IMHO, there is no real difference between a "psychological disorder" or "mental illness." Both need to be treated in the most appropriate way -- be it with therapy or medication & therapy (I am not a big believer in meds only, at least not initially, but that is another thread) and those with the illnesses should be treated with respect and understanding. (as should anyone with any illness, including PA)

On Jan 17, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by ElleMo: [b]Mommbear:

I just noticed your previous thread on "mental illness" and see the same question posed with the "psychological disorder" so I am curious as to your questions -- are you just seeking out people's attitudes in general? Do you perceive a difference between mental illness and psychological disorder?

IMHO, there is no real difference between a "psychological disorder" or "mental illness." Both need to be treated in the most appropriate way -- be it with therapy or medication & therapy (I am not a big believer in meds only, at least not initially, but that is another thread) and those with the illnesses should be treated with respect and understanding. (as should anyone with any illness, including PA)[/b]

[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum3/HTML/001236.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum3/HTML/001236.html[/url]

Just trying to accomodate some ideas from this thread. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/cool.gif[/img]

I guess I got to ask myself: is a condition subject to change to accomodate definitions/labels, or is a definition/label subject to change to accomodate the condition. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]

I also gotta ask myself: Should I start a topic entitled:

[b]Psychiatric Disorders as a Disability? Thoughts?[/b]

(In an attempt to prepare a forum that may conducive to response/input and obtain a more thorough sample, and see where perceptions may converge.)

I've also got to remind myself that even in non-circular discussions, at some point, expanding linearity will do the same, eventually. Unless, of course, the same are travelling in completely parallel paths. (Indicating, some similarity or shared experience? ----- [i]Ironic, no?[/i]) WRT human experience, I have found this rare, if I have found it at all.

Even if such linearity is diametrically oppposed........ an [i]opportunity[/i] to examine head on and contemplate [b]perspective[/b]?

BTW. I cherish your thoughts on "[i]respect and understanding[/i]". [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

On Jan 18, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by MommaBear: [b] *I* am more interested in what *others* percieve it to be, but, I guess I'd have to ask myself:

"Where would I look for an *authorative* definition -- What constitutes an *authoratative* definition?"

I'd also have to ask myself:

"How would such a definition be determined?"

[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]

[/b]

[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum7/HTML/001000.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum7/HTML/001000.html[/url]

[i] whooooooooooooooooa...... [/i]

[b]Dejavu[/b].

(All this Dejavu in a thread not even related to PA? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img])

On Jan 18, 2004

ElleMo, thank-you for your posts which did help to clarify things for me, as best they could.

Okay, have to ask, and it does go into the disability part of the question.

Are there degrees of severity of psychological disorders/mental illnesses?

In my opinion? Yes.

I take two different medications daily for anxiety. Am I proud of it? No.

When going to get one of my prescriptions refilled when I first moved to this town, I had a doctor diagnose me with Generalized Anxiety Disorder. He had spoken with me for less than 5 minutes, just knew what meds I was requesting refills on. So, all of a sudden, I had GAD stuck on my forehead. Do I have Generalized Anxiety Disorder? I don't know. I know that I take two different anti-anxiety medications a day. So, I *must* be anxious at least.

Within the last two months, my anxiety level has been heightened by one event (and the resulting things thereafter) and anxiety/panic attacks which I had well under control have suddenly re-surfaced again (I can still remember my first panic attack). They began to happen on Sundays only and I figured that one out for me psychologically. I know why they're happening on Sunday.

Then, presented with another situation, again, from that one event, a situation that scares the absolute bejesus out of me and I am unable to solve at this moment at all, I have been hit with panic attacks, if I think about the situation, on an almost daily basis.

Why? Why would I be having anxiety attacks on a daily basis? Because I'm scared sh**less. Makes sense to me. I am truly afraid.

So, having experienced my first anxiety attack when I was about 30, and having had them off and on for nearly 15 years, it took one incident and the fall-out thereafter for me to suddenly have them every Sunday. Now, they're almost daily.

For me, a psychological disorder, which I consider anxiety attacks to be (or GAD to be) can have different degrees of severity and may or may not be disabling or considered a disability.

My ex-DH experienced a trauma in his 20's and he started to experience anxiety attacks that were absolutely horrifying. He would always ask me if he looked any different physically when he was having them and the only thing I could relate to was my migraines (a body thing, not a mind thing). He was pale and did look shaken and looked like a deer who had been caught in headlights, but other than that, he looked okay.

He got to the point where he could not drive for anything other than what was required - i.e., to get to work.

I remember the night my Father died and we got "the call". My ex-DH had to pull over to the side of the road on the way to my parents' home (my Father was already dead [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img] ) because he was unable to drive.

The anxiety attacks certainly did prohibit him from taking leisurely drives in the country. I think the last birthday of his that we spent together (his 35th), we had had dinner at a lovely restaurant in north Toronto. We had to take a cab home and it was going along the 401. He lay huddled in my arms in the back seat (all 6'5" and 220 pounds of him) while I stroked his head and tried to calm him down.

He did have medication for his anxiety attacks (interestingly enough, one of my anxiety medications was actually prescribed for migraines when I was 26) and he also went through extensive talk therapy.

In speaking about it now, I wonder if he ever conquered them and if they were *situational* (i.e., being married to me [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img] )

Current DH also suffers from anxiety attacks and is medicated for them as well. He does not deal with them the same way I do at all. He will lash out verbally. Or, he has this *thing* where he can't be touched (I can't stand having my hair touched).

I've just spoken about I know, all panic disorder stuff. I have seen how debilitating they can be. I had one just about an hour ago to-day (I've changed the title of the Boomtown Rats song to "I Don't Like Sundays" but I only sing the one line, not the whole horrid song).

So, yes to varying degrees of severity for psychological disorders.

But what about mental illnesses like schizophrenia? Okay, I've already answered that myself in the mental illness thread. I posted about two different schizophrenics that I know (one my SIL and one a dear friend) and how different their schizophrenia is.

Also, ElleMo, I do like that you had to say about the stigma that is attached to psychological disorders/mental illnesses. A lot of people had great difficulty posting in the thread that I raised about PA parents on anti-anxiety/depressant medication and sad to say, even nowadays, rightfully so.

And yes, it is a lot more difficult to get actual treatment. Here, in Ontario (Momma Bear, this will interest you, socialized medicine and all), if you go to a psychiatrist, your visits are covered. If you go to a psychologist (except under certain circumstances), they are not. The only time I was able to see a psychologist without paying (and I did find the psychologist more helpful than any psychiatrist I had seen) was when I was pregnant with Ember. They had a psychologist that was employed by the hospital to deal with pregnant women and I could see her because I was, well, pregnant.

Where I live now, I do think that we have some fairly *good* resources for people, but the behavioural pediatrician that my daughter saw was the only one in town. So, if you weren't comfortable with him or his diagnosis, it wasn't as though you could shop around town for another one.

I have one ongoing discussion with a doctor at the walk-in clinic every time I see him about cognitive therapy and how when I was born I was not meant to be taking two anti-anxiety medications. I asked him if there was a cognitive psychiatrist in town. Of course not. I told him that when there was, he could refer me.

Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

------------------

On Jan 19, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by Alternative to Mainstream: [b]ElleMo, thank-you for your posts which did help to clarify things for me, as best they could.

Okay, have to ask, and it does go into the disability part of the question.

Are there degrees of severity of psychological disorders/mental illnesses?

In my opinion? Yes. [/b]

I agree. I think that some people can be treated with just therapy, or a life-style change (diet & exercise etc.) while others must be on medication; some for a short time; some for an extended time, some indefinitely.

Quote:

I take two different medications daily for anxiety. Am I proud of it? No.

Why you should worry about being 'proud'? Is a diabetic 'proud' to be on insulin; an asthmatic 'proud' to be on steroids'?; I'm not proud to be on migraine medication nor was I proud to be on anti-depressants several years ago. But you do what you have to do to live & stay as healthy as you can

Quote:

... For me, a psychological disorder, which I consider anxiety attacks to be (or GAD to be) can have different degrees of severity and may or may not be disabling or considered a disability.

Certainly. There are people who won't leave their house due to anxiety disorders. Other can perform their jobs & go home but can not handle social functions. There is a wide range

Quote:

... But what about mental illnesses like schizophrenia? Okay, I've already answered that myself in the mental illness thread. I posted about two different schizophrenics that I know (one my SIL and one a dear friend) and how different their schizophrenia is.

By its definition, schizophrenia is pretty disabling. BUT, from what I understand, most people with schizophrenia can be treated. The problem is keeping them on their medication.

Quote:

Also, ElleMo, I do like that you had to say about the stigma that is attached to psychological disorders/mental illnesses. A lot of people had great difficulty posting in the thread that I raised about PA parents on anti-anxiety/depressant medication and sad to say, even nowadays, rightfully so.

Oh yes, I know there are many people who would not hire someone who had depression.

Quote:

And yes, it is a lot more difficult to get actual treatment. Here, in Ontario (Momma Bear, this will interest you, socialized medicine and all), if you go to a psychiatrist, your visits are covered.

In the US, it depends on your insurance, but in general, medication is covered; therapy usualy has limited coverage. But there are many ways that the insurance companies can limit even the meds.

Best wishes to you too.

Ellen

------------------ Ellen Allergic to Shellfish/ Mom to Jesse 9/01 who has PA

On Jan 28, 2004

Psychological disorders are, in my opinion, a physiological problem and should be regarded as such. I really wish the insurance companies would stop treating psychological disorders as different than any other chronic physical illness. I know some people who are unable to function physically because of debilitating depression or bipolar problems.

As for me, I am clinically depressed and would be pretty much unable to function in a safe or predictable manner if I were not taking meds. Also, I might add, I am chronically sarcastic and obnoxious. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]

Amy

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