Psycho-Social Factors Influence Adolescents

Posted on: Sun, 01/15/2006 - 11:46am
ajinnj's picture
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[url="http://allergies.about.com/library/blfaan031003b.htm"]http://allergies.about.com/library/blfaan031003b.htm[/url]

Psycho-Social Factors Influence Adolescents

Adolescents at Highest Risk of Death From Food Allergy

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Posted on: Sun, 01/15/2006 - 11:14pm
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[url="http://www.nursingworld.org/mods/mod620/ceyth01.htm"]http://www.nursingworld.org/mods/mod620/ceyth01.htm[/url]
edit: link has several pages in "table of contents" at the top
General disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form. I do not guarantee the accuracy, currentness or content of the link in this post.
also posted in:
[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum10/HTML/000273.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum10/HTML/000273.html[/url]
[This message has been edited by MommaBear (edited January 16, 2006).]

Posted on: Sun, 01/15/2006 - 11:20pm
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double post. see edit.
[This message has been edited by MommaBear (edited January 16, 2006).]

Posted on: Mon, 01/16/2006 - 2:22am
McKenziesMom's picture
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Thanks for re-raising Mommabear.
It reiterates my suspicion that teens may not be as forthright about their allergies as they need to be.
For example, when I had to call my DD's supervisor to explain why she wouldn't be to work on Sunday, she said "What's she allergic to again?" That worried me, but then she went on to say "oh, yes, McKenzie, I only work weekends, so I still don't have all the names memorized...hmmm.
On the upside, my dd put in her MSN blog that she's allergic to peanuts, nuts and shellfish, and yesterday, when she ended up staying home from work due to her reaction, she put that in her MSN message and we got about 18 phonecalls from concerned friends, so I know her circle of friends is aware.
Hopefully, by the time she goes to university in 2 1/2 years, she will be equally forthright with her new friends.
With her it's definitely a shyness thing rather than an "invincibility" issue.

Posted on: Mon, 01/16/2006 - 3:34am
Peg541's picture
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Joined: 12/29/2002 - 09:00

McKenzies mom
You are right about a shyness thing. I think kids with potentially fatal allergies have to show everyone their achilles heel and that is tough when you are a teenager.
One thing might help your daughter. My son told everyone who ever came in contact with him. In one way or another, not in a right out "nice to meet you I can die if you eat peanuts around me" type of fashion.
It just made it's way into their conversations sooner or later, his epi pens are visible on his belt loop and his medic alert bracelet is always there and that prompts questions.
We found that his friends have been incredibly supportive. They have circled their wagons around him and done their best to help him keep safe.
Kids called him at school to say "don't eat the soup, it has peanuts", one even hung a sign up at the cafeteria entrance in case he did not get the call in time.
When he had a big airborne reaction at a theater in town he went right back to school (after he felt the Benadryl had done it's job) and surrounded himself with his friends. He told them what happened and they were there for him.
In one small way his PA has made him more visible and forced him to maybe be a bit more outgoing than he would have chosen to be. This was wonderful since he was so quiet in High School. [b]College has helped him become who he is supposed to be[/b] and I believe his PA helped that a bit.
His first night at college so many people came to him asking if he was the "peanut guy" and asking to hear what PA was all about.
His PA also facilitated the two dorms associated with his community to think outside of their own lives and ban peanuts so he could have a haven of safety. They even kept that ban active while he was in Scotland for a semester.
So I would say his experience has been a good one. He's handled the psycho-social part of his PA pretty well so far.
Peg

Posted on: Sun, 01/15/2006 - 11:14pm
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

[url="http://www.nursingworld.org/mods/mod620/ceyth01.htm"]http://www.nursingworld.org/mods/mod620/ceyth01.htm[/url]
edit: link has several pages in "table of contents" at the top
General disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form. I do not guarantee the accuracy, currentness or content of the link in this post.
also posted in:
[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum10/HTML/000273.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum10/HTML/000273.html[/url]
[This message has been edited by MommaBear (edited January 16, 2006).]

Posted on: Sun, 01/15/2006 - 11:20pm
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

double post. see edit.
[This message has been edited by MommaBear (edited January 16, 2006).]

Posted on: Mon, 01/16/2006 - 2:22am
McKenziesMom's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/05/2001 - 09:00

Thanks for re-raising Mommabear.
It reiterates my suspicion that teens may not be as forthright about their allergies as they need to be.
For example, when I had to call my DD's supervisor to explain why she wouldn't be to work on Sunday, she said "What's she allergic to again?" That worried me, but then she went on to say "oh, yes, McKenzie, I only work weekends, so I still don't have all the names memorized...hmmm.
On the upside, my dd put in her MSN blog that she's allergic to peanuts, nuts and shellfish, and yesterday, when she ended up staying home from work due to her reaction, she put that in her MSN message and we got about 18 phonecalls from concerned friends, so I know her circle of friends is aware.
Hopefully, by the time she goes to university in 2 1/2 years, she will be equally forthright with her new friends.
With her it's definitely a shyness thing rather than an "invincibility" issue.

Posted on: Mon, 01/16/2006 - 3:34am
Peg541's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/29/2002 - 09:00

McKenzies mom
You are right about a shyness thing. I think kids with potentially fatal allergies have to show everyone their achilles heel and that is tough when you are a teenager.
One thing might help your daughter. My son told everyone who ever came in contact with him. In one way or another, not in a right out "nice to meet you I can die if you eat peanuts around me" type of fashion.
It just made it's way into their conversations sooner or later, his epi pens are visible on his belt loop and his medic alert bracelet is always there and that prompts questions.
We found that his friends have been incredibly supportive. They have circled their wagons around him and done their best to help him keep safe.
Kids called him at school to say "don't eat the soup, it has peanuts", one even hung a sign up at the cafeteria entrance in case he did not get the call in time.
When he had a big airborne reaction at a theater in town he went right back to school (after he felt the Benadryl had done it's job) and surrounded himself with his friends. He told them what happened and they were there for him.
In one small way his PA has made him more visible and forced him to maybe be a bit more outgoing than he would have chosen to be. This was wonderful since he was so quiet in High School. [b]College has helped him become who he is supposed to be[/b] and I believe his PA helped that a bit.
His first night at college so many people came to him asking if he was the "peanut guy" and asking to hear what PA was all about.
His PA also facilitated the two dorms associated with his community to think outside of their own lives and ban peanuts so he could have a haven of safety. They even kept that ban active while he was in Scotland for a semester.
So I would say his experience has been a good one. He's handled the psycho-social part of his PA pretty well so far.
Peg

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