60 posts / 0 new
Last post
Posted on: Tue, 05/04/1999 - 5:23am
ElizabethsMom's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/17/1999 - 09:00

I too ate a lot of peanut butter while breastfeeding. In fact, I was a one-to-two packages of Reese's per day peanut butter eater. Like most everyone, I ate a lot to keep up my calories and increase the amount of protein in my diet. I should note that my lactation consultant and pediatrician were well aware of my diet and never once warned against consuming it despite the fact that my daughter has excema and my family history includes asthma - Everything I've read indicates that these are common in families with high incidences of peanut and food allergies. In addition I was a reluctant breast feeder and only kept it up because I was repeatedly told that it was the best thing for my baby....how wrong they were!
I am very angry and very jaded about the whole incident and am furious that the March of Dimes isn't taking these correlations seriously. I'm an MS in Marketing who is very well-versed in statistcal analysis. My husband is a PhD in chemistry. We understand that correlation is not necessarily indicative of causation. However every statitiscal method recommends erring on the conservative side (total avoidance of peanuts in this case) when the outcome is so damning for those affected.
I am appalled that the March of Dimes isn't responsibly suggesting avoidance to be on the safe side. Since when has it been their policy to recommend anything that is harmful and potentially fatal to chidren? I would love to see us take this on as a media campaign and get it overturned. The estimated 2.5 million Americans directly affected by peanut allergies and their families deserve better.
I hadn't intended this to be so full of rage....I guess we all have our hot buttons regarding our children's allergies - this is mine -Kristin
------------------
Kristin

Posted on: Tue, 05/04/1999 - 12:50pm
Shan's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/05/1999 - 09:00

I was lying in bed last night after I posted on this topic and started thinking...so all these doctors are telling us there is no correlation between eating peanuts during pregnancy and nursing and developing a peanut allergy, but yet WHY IS IT they tell us to take vitamins and avoid alcohol and spicy foods while nursing? They seem to think these things can pass thru our milk to our babies, but yet the peanuts can't? This seems quite simple to me. If we have a child who might have a tendency towards food allergies, it would seem that we could sensitize them thru our milk, does it not? Just a thought...Shan

Posted on: Tue, 05/04/1999 - 12:51pm
Shan's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/05/1999 - 09:00

I was lying in bed last night after I posted on this topic and started thinking...so all these doctors are telling us there is no correlation between eating peanuts during pregnancy and nursing and developing a peanut allergy, but yet WHY IS IT they tell us to take vitamins and avoid alcohol and spicy foods while nursing? They seem to think these things can pass thru our milk to our babies, but yet the peanuts can't? This seems quite simple to me. If we have a child who might have a tendency towards food allergies, it would seem that we could sensitize them thru our milk, does it not? Just a thought...Shan

Posted on: Wed, 05/05/1999 - 1:41am
Carol S's picture
Offline
Joined: 02/10/1999 - 09:00

I just wanted to mention that I've finally read an article that mentioned do not eat peanuts, nuts, eggs, shellfish etc. while breastfeeding if they are any type of allergies in your family. Boy, wish I had read this 2 years ago. It is in the Healthy kids mag. the April/May issue in an article in the back that was I believe was on Asthma.
The web-site for the mag. is healthykids.com
I saw this in my son's allergist's office.
Just a final note. I am now pregnant again and I put myself on my son's strict avoidance diet.
Carol

Posted on: Wed, 05/05/1999 - 4:03am
Kelly Morse's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/13/1999 - 09:00

Kristin - I agree with your post - this is my hot button as well. Why not go with the side of caution when we are dealing with the health of children!?!?
I, too, was also very reluctant when it came to breastfeeding. For three years (I had two babies 13 months apart) medical professions and average citizens have chosen to impose their opinions on me concerning their desire for me to breastfeed. I decided not to breastfeed because it meant being off my asthma medication for a longer length of time which put my health and life at risk. I am now thankful that I made that decision because it turned out to be in the best interest of my son, even though I did not know it at the time!
Shan - I also agreed with what you said about passing stuff through breast milk. Your comments made perfect sense to me!
Thanks!
------------------
Kelly M
Another Mom in Michigan

Posted on: Mon, 05/17/1999 - 3:32am
Patsmom's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/17/1999 - 09:00

My experience--I ate a lot of peanut butter (craved it) while pregnant with both of my boys. My oldest doesn't have any food allergies. My youngest has a severe peanut allergy & has only had one bite of peanut butter in his life when he was 2.5 years old (by accident after the allergy had been diagnosed via skin testing when he was 10 mos. old). I did not breastfeed, so IMO, the only way he could've been exposed/sensitized was during the pregnancy.
Since then, I've heard/read that if there's a family history of food allergies (any kind of food, not just peanut) that you should not eat any peanut products during the last trimester of pregnancy. My DH had food allergies as a child (corn, milk). If I'd known this during my pregnancies, I wouldn't have eaten peanuts/peanut butter & I won't if I have a third child!
Karen

Posted on: Wed, 05/19/1999 - 2:14am
tracy's picture
Offline
Joined: 02/03/1999 - 09:00

I recently had my annual exam and told my ob/gyn about my son's peanut allergy and how my allergist told me I sensitized him while breastfeeding. My doctor heard me out and I could tell he was trying very hard to be respectful of what I was telling him. However, when I was finished he told me that there were too many things like this to worry about -- that he couldn't tell his patients every little problem like this that could happen and that they would have to worry about eating all foods that might sensitize their babies. I completely understand what he was saying -- there are so many sensationalist warnings out there that if we heeded all of them we'd end up sitting at home scared to eat anything. Ironically, his attitude was one of the reasons I chose him -- he's very laid back and non-reactive. But I was discouraged until I realized later on that he probably doesn't know how dangerous peanut allergies are and I didn't think to educate him when I told him my story.
Anyway, I'm not going to try to convince him anymore. It is frustrating that these doctors are not educated about the seriousness of the allergy.
--Tracy

Posted on: Wed, 06/16/1999 - 11:45pm
LouiseLarsen's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/07/1999 - 09:00

I absolutely believe that my eating peanuts during pregancy and while nursing caused this allergy in my child! There is no doubt in my mind whatsoever.
There is also absolutely no interest in my medical practitioners to look into this theory or even to entertain the suggestion that a "mom" might be correct in her "hunches". This allergy has taught me more about trusting my instincts than virtually anything else in my life.
I am VERY INTERESTED in getting a United States medical group to do a major study in this subject matter.
It appears that Britain and Canada have reserched peanut sensitization via the mother and have no problem getting the message out to the public.
WHAT IS WRONG WITH OUR COUNTRY IN NOT DOING THE SAME?
I hate to sound like some crazy paranoiac, but IS it because of the rich agricultural lawyers being sent to Washington, D.C. to lobby in behalf of wealth American peanut growers? Is there any kind of a deliberate attempt on the part of american businessmen to hush up any "new" discoveries about the peanut?
Are peanuts primarily an american product?
I really want to know. Maybe if we follow the "dollar sign" on this subject we can learn more about why it appears to not have a "voice" in our government. Maybe if we can narrow down who is making the most profit from harvesting, and selling peanuts we can go to them directly and enlist their support for creating a vacine to prevent anaphylaxis.
(It would make them look good to donate money to our cause AND it would give us more money to put into medical research. It would also simply give our situation more publicity.)
I'd love to know if anyone else has any thoughts on this.
- thanks.
------------------

Posted on: Thu, 06/17/1999 - 2:24am
susan's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/19/1999 - 09:00

Chris:
I never breastfed our baby but I did eat peanut butter during the pregnancy. Our allergist told me that no one is born allergic, just with a genentic tendency to develop allergies if there is exposure...and that no one has a reaction on first exposure...so he assumed I breastfed and that caused my baby's allergy to peanuts. when I told him otherwise he said that it was a mystery. Guess he hasn't seen any of the article that talk about in utero sensitization. How else can my case be explained?
susan

Posted on: Thu, 06/17/1999 - 3:55pm
EILEEN's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/06/1999 - 09:00

Louise, i don't think you are being paranoid I think you are right. And when the dangers of peanuts are known here in the US, the profits will come from overseas where the dangers are not know, This is how cigarette companies make their $$ now.

Pages

Forum

Click on one of the categories below to see all forum topics.

Peanut Free Store

More Articles

Halloween can be treacherous for a child with a peanut allergy and a parent who is trying to stay...

What kid doesn't love dressing up in a costume and going door to door on Halloween night, and collecting a bag full of candy? Unfortunately, this...

Are you looking for peanut-free candies as a special treat for a child with...

For those with peanut allergies, baked goods present a serious risk. Many baked goods do not appear to contain peanuts, yet were baked in a...

Do you have a sweet tooth and more specifically a chocolate craving? Those with peanut allergies must...