poll- do you believe PA can be outgrown?

Posted on: Tue, 01/13/2004 - 9:54am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

I recently posted that I was skeptical about people outgrowing PA (my opinion) and I wondered how others feel about this issue, I am new to this whole PA thing and maybe I'm still to afraid to believe otherwise. So please, tell me what you think.
Thanks,
Lisa

Posted on: Tue, 01/13/2004 - 10:08am
erik's picture
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Joined: 05/15/2001 - 09:00

Anything is possible, but I believe that very few people outgrow peanut allergy. And the few people who do outgrow PA... maybe they weren't allergic to it in the first place, or it was a very minor allergy.
This is different than other allergies such as eggs, where a large number of people do outgrow the allergy.
Just my personal opinion that not many people outgrow peanut allergies... maybe a few.. but I don't think there are many.

Posted on: Tue, 01/13/2004 - 10:22am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Erik,
This is weird, after I posted this question I was thinking, I hope the Pa veterans like erik, cindy, mommabear etc reply to this, that I would like the views of people who have been here a long time, then I check back and see your reply....It was weird, you would have to know me to understand that, but I'm one of these people who "think" things or dream about things then they happen (k, I'm rambling, but you get the jist....just wish the lottery numbers would cross my mind....lol.) I share your view, I would be really afraid the "outgrown" allergy would come back and when it did that my son wouldn't be prepared. We plan on treating it like a life-long allergy not matter what tests or Doctors tell us. Thanks for posting.
Lisa
btw, I'm not claiming to be psychic, just one of the people who has had some weird things happen.

Posted on: Tue, 01/13/2004 - 10:26am
erik's picture
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Joined: 05/15/2001 - 09:00

Hi Lisa,
Yes.. weird things do happen. That's why I replied at that time as I knew you were waiting [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]
Anyway, I agree.. even if I was to "outgrow" it, I would avoid peanuts for life, because the allergy could return anyday.. it is very unpredictable.. severe.. mild.. or no reaction .. you never know what the next reaction will be like.
I hope more people reply as well [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Tue, 01/13/2004 - 11:02am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

logansmom, well, I've read that children have a 20% chance of outgrowing PA if they have never had an anaphylactic reaction. However, I'm with erik. I think it's rarer than 20% and would question whether the person was really allergic or not. Not to dash hopes or anything, but it just seems to be so serious.
I would never tell anyone who had hope that I didn't believe they should have it though.
I also really checked in my head before I answered and know that I'm not simply saying this because I know Jesse won't be outgrowing his (due to his three anaphylactic reactions).
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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Posted on: Tue, 01/13/2004 - 12:05pm
wendysco's picture
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Joined: 05/03/2003 - 09:00

I wouldn't want to deny anyone hope either, But in our case, I don't believe it is something our ds is going to outgrow, and he has only ever had hives and it could only have been from cross contamination we have never actually given him nuts.
Also erik makes a good point it could come back anytime so even if blood tests and skin tests were negative it would not change the way we live. Dh and I have discussed the future possibility of negative testing and have decided that we would not want food challenges or introduce nuts/soy back into our lives.

Posted on: Tue, 01/13/2004 - 1:01pm
pjama0502's picture
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Joined: 08/04/2003 - 09:00

I believe it can be outgrown, simply because there are studies in which children have outgrown it. I believe in one study a child who had had an anphlaytic reaction even outgrew it. I have also talked with one adult who state she had a peanut allergy as a child and have since outgrown interestingly she developed a shellfish allergy in her 30s.) I also know one woman who's child had a BAD reaction to pecans and is now no longer allergic (eats them regularly). Having said this, I believe those with a history of severe reactions or high CAP RAST numbers will most likely not outgrow the allergy.
As for the allergy recurring, I believe I read that the chances of a recurrence are about 4%. This however is based on only one study. I don't have the study at my fingertips (although I will track down the citation if any one is interested).
Just my $0.02
Jen

Posted on: Tue, 01/13/2004 - 1:31pm
tracy's picture
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Joined: 02/03/1999 - 09:00

Oh, absolutely I believe it can be outgrown.
My son had one really bad reaction when he was 13 months old after eating a small peanut butter cookie. He vomited multiple times, swelled up and got bad hives. We had him tested -- the RAST test (in 1999, shortly after his reaction) -- and it was a 5 out of 6. We were told by the doctor that because his reaction was severe and because his test result was so high, he would definitely have this allergy the rest of his life.
He is now 6 years old and he hasn't had another reaction since. We've been diligent about not feeding him anything with peanuts, but we have peanut butter in the house. He attends kindergarten at a Montessori School and sits next to children who eat peanut butter, peanuts in the shell, peanuts out of the shell all the time. (I've had lunch with him a few times there. After observing the contents of these children's lunches, one would think there is only one food group -- peanuts.)
We had him tested by another doctor last year who is ultra-conservative. He gave me a big time lecture about not having peanut butter in the house, given our son's previous test results. But when he tested him with the CAP RAST, his result was so low that the doctor said he now has a high chance of outgrowing the allergy.
We're not rushing out to feed him peanuts to find out of course. We'll probably have him tested in a few years and see how things stand.
--Tracy
[This message has been edited by tracy (edited January 13, 2004).]

Posted on: Tue, 01/13/2004 - 1:32pm
tracy's picture
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Joined: 02/03/1999 - 09:00

disregard this...
[This message has been edited by tracy (edited January 13, 2004).]

Posted on: Tue, 01/13/2004 - 1:37pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

tracy, I think what happened with your son and family is simply wonderful. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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Posted on: Tue, 01/13/2004 - 9:16pm
StaceyK's picture
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Joined: 05/06/2003 - 09:00

I think it can be outgrown (20%), but can come back. This is timely, because I was just reading a study in a Pediatrics journal last night. I was thinking like all of you - then why would I ever relax my diligence for my daughter's PA, even if she outgrew it? I have read elsewhere that to keep the allergy down once it's gone you have to continue to eat peanuts and not let it lapse, contradicting what other articles say. Everything about PA seems contradictory and I have to admit that drives me crazy. I am an info-junkie but nothing seems to fall into neat categorization with this condition.

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