Peanut plants and pollen

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I'm at a loss on this one. I've learned my DD school will be taking a field trip to a community children's garden this summer where one thing they grow is peanut plants. After calling, I've learned the peanut plants will not be in season for sampling, but they do hand out samples when they are in season in the fall. Does anyone have any information about the plants/pollen? We had considered going there on our own before learning of this trip, but I decided against it then based on the peanut stuff. I voiced my concern to the school coordinator who assured me they are allergy aware and do contact the facility when there are kids with allergies coming. We all know what "allergy aware" means to those who don't have PN allergy, so I need to research this. I want to have some concrete ideas when I discuss this again and determine if my child should go or not. There are also other PN allergic kids in the school, but not many who are severe from what the school nurse shared with me.

Any ideas?!

On Mar 29, 2008

I found a chapter from a book re: peanut. I also wanted to add that I totally agree with you on how others call an "allergy safe" product/event etc. Also, the nurse commenting on others who have pa and are less severe would concern me.

[url="http://gears.tucson.ars.ag.gov/book/chap3/peanut.html"]peanut[/url]

On Mar 29, 2008

The nuts themselves may not be in season for eating, but the plant itself will no doubt be growing. There will be peanut protein in the leaves of the peanut plant. Of course, you won't allow your child to touch.

Peanuts are self pollinating...so I would think that there would be far less pollen in the air. They are not a plant that relies on the wind. Insects help out, I'm sure. For more info on self pollination, have a look here:

[url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-pollination"]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-pollination[/url]

Once the peanut flowers come out, they must be self pollinated in one day! That means the actual peanut flower only blooms for less than one day. That seems like a good thing to me.

On Mar 29, 2008

Thanks for the info so far. I agree, the self pollination may limit the pollens in the air. The lady at the garden told me they would avoid the plants, which I hope would really happen. Of course I would tell my daughter to not touch the plant - she reacts so strongly to skin contact already.

So I am really wondering if anyone has ever heard of someone reacting to the plant/pollen? I have not, but I don't think I'm as well read in PA as some on this board are. I just want to make sure I'm making an informed decision about my child going/not going, not just deciding based on fear of the unknown.

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