Peanut Oil

Posted on: Tue, 03/16/1999 - 12:17pm
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I would highly recommend avoiding peanut oil in any food products, even the refined peanut oil. After receiving a newsletter from FAN with a notation in it that Pringles is now making a pizza flavored chip that contains peanut oil. I have wondered why there is such a middle of the road stand on refined peanut oil and its ability to cause a reaction.

The following sites will help to inform you more about peanut oil research findings. I conclude from the research work that I should stay away from all peanut oils, including the refined oil.

[url="http://www.allerg.qc.ca/peanutallergy.htm"]www.allerg.qc.ca/peanutallergy.htm[/url] scroll down to the peanut oil section

[url="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=9720819&form=6&d..."]www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=9720819&form=6&db=m&Dop...

Just recently, on one of the peanutallergy.com message boards a post noted that a child had an allergic reaction to a cheese cracker mix with peanut oil in it.

Stay Safe!

[This message has been edited by Mary (edited March 16, 1999).]

[This message has been edited by Mary (edited March 16, 1999).]

Posted on: Fri, 07/21/2000 - 2:48pm
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My understanding (from my allergist and something I read) is that what a person is allergic to in a peanut is actually the PROTEINS in the peanut....Therefore, peanut oil technically is only the oil from the peanut and NOT proteins. However, one cannot be too sure if the peanut oil is truly "pure"...so that is why they say to stay away from peanut oil too (i think just in case)...I believe that the same reasoning may be the case with peanut flour..but again, why chance it..Do you know someone who did NOT react to peanut oil?

Posted on: Fri, 07/21/2000 - 3:19pm
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Thanks for your reply, Kathrine. Well, my son ate PB for the first time and got hives scattered basically all over within 15 mins. He had had french fries before in a restaurant and did fine. After the PB incident, we revisited the same restaurant and I asked what they cooked the fries in - they said peanut oil...... Now, I guess that counted as his "first exposure" and the PB therefore was his second exposure, hence the reaction..... Sound reasonable?

Posted on: Sat, 07/22/2000 - 4:27am
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After a doctor told me it was impossible that I reacted to peanut oil, I started investigating further....because I did in fact react.
I believe this has been brought up on other threads. There are different temperatures that places "press the oil" at. At a very hot temperature, it is suppose to kill the actually peanut protein, but thus bring out better flavor. If the temperature does not become hot enough, or if it is cold pressed (which many places prefer), the peanut protein is still very much a part of the oil and thus a reaction can occur.
It is better to be safe than sorry.

Posted on: Sat, 07/22/2000 - 8:45am
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LisaG - it is hard to know if it was for sure the peanut oil. My daughter's first reaction to PButter she had a rash around her mouth..but I wasn't sure if it was the cracker (that scatched her mouth) or not. The second time she had Pbutter...her eyes swelled, face swelled, etc. Maybe your child's "second" reaction (hives) was really his first? Who knows about the Peanut oil...as you can tell from the responses..there is a debate if peanut oil really causes an issue..I am safe rather than sorry.

Posted on: Sun, 07/23/2000 - 6:48am
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My PA daughter reacted to Peanut Oil, and she hadn't eaten the fries. She only touched the hands of her sister who had and then rubbed her eyes. On the other hand, she ate a Snack Wells cookie that contained Peanut Flour and had no reaction. My allergist told me to not pay attention to the info on Peanut Oil saying it could be O.K. As he says, it is never worth the risk of it being the 2% that may cause a reaction.

Posted on: Sun, 07/23/2000 - 6:53am
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I posted this under one of the threads in Living With a Peanut Allergy but I will here again so sorry to anyone who already read it. About a month ago we went to a local Italian restaurant and I felt a little shy (he was just diagnosed and didn't have the guts to speak my mind) about asking if anything contained peanut flour/oil. My son ate one bite of a cheese pizza and had one of his typical mild (yes, he has experienced anaphylactic too) reaction. He continued his coughing and gagging spell for about 20 minutes before we left and decided to come home. It continued for about another hour before it stopped. This past weekend we went again and this time I asked. The waitress said that she had worked there for seven years and had never heard of it but I insisted that she ask the chef. I was a bit surprised to find out they put peanut oil in their sauce. It was a good thing I didn't trust her! Now I will be more aware of peanut oil being in products since I believe that is what he reacted to.

Posted on: Sun, 07/02/2000 - 10:32pm
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pWe were originally told that peanut oil was fine for our PA son. No one ever mentioned heat pressed vs. cold pressed. He did have it for many years without any problems. After his second reaction ever, I learned so much more and found this site and realized that we had been very lucky that he hadn't had a reaction. Maybe he never would have but I know there are people here on the site who have had reactions to peanut oil. I do not believe that the manufacturers are required to tell you on the label whether the oil is heat pressed or not. Look under the labeling topic for more information about that. It is an individual choice but definitely read up on it more. Good luck./p

Posted on: Sun, 07/02/2000 - 11:26pm
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pWe avoid all peanut oil cooked food. Our oldest daughter can't even go in a restaurant and breath the air if they are cooking with peanut oil. She has to go outside and use her inhaler./p
pSince most restaurants have a hard enough time even knowing if they use peanut oil, I would be surprised if they knew if it was cold pressed or not./p
pI would tend to follow the advice of an emergency room doctor. I would expect that type of doctor has seen it all. Besides, why take the chance?/p

Posted on: Mon, 07/03/2000 - 2:28am
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pI would agree that there is a Federal guideling difference, however, most people do not know this information, and your emergency room doctor was right in saying to avoid all! Better to be safe than sorry. Especially in restaurants.....the workers NEVER know the difference between oils, much less how the oil was cooked, and if they are wrong.....it is better just to avoid. =)br /
Be safe!/p

Posted on: Wed, 07/05/2000 - 10:58am
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pDo a search on my name as username and the words peanut oil and you will find a hyperlink to the British Medical Journal article that discusses this topic. I have to go now so can't hunt it up for you. Take care./p

Posted on: Wed, 06/14/2000 - 4:13pm
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Carolynm,
Our daughter CANNOT have the peanut oil. The chance of it having the protein in it is too great. It can be a process issue and a cross-contamination issue. It is not a bad idea to let people know that all peanut oil can cause a reaction. I am not saying it will. I am only saying it can. Our daughter's doctor said that she should never have any kind of peanut oil - no matter the processing.
Stay safe,
Sue in Sunny Arizona

Posted on: Wed, 06/14/2000 - 9:37pm
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I saw the report too. I posted on the main discussion board right before it came on. There is a link there to the feature story about Elizabeth. I also keep my son away from peanut oil. Since they aren't required to tell how it is processed, it could be a danger. I was originally told that peanut oil was fine and he did have it for years with no problems, however, after a cross contamination reaction I crossed it off the list. I do not know if it was peanuts or possible peanut oil that caused the reaction.

Posted on: Thu, 06/15/2000 - 11:33am
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Peanut oil is also off limits to our son. Our doctor thinks the risk is too great. (And so do we.) Personally, I'd rather people think peanut oil was dangerous than to have them look at me the way many already do, and tell me that they heard on tv that peanut oil was safe. (Does anyone else get that cross-eyed look from people that seems to say "you must be crazy if you think a little ole peanut could do that!")

Posted on: Fri, 06/16/2000 - 12:02am
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Here is the link to a study on peanut oil: [url="http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/314/7087/1084"]http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/314/7087/1084[/url]

Posted on: Fri, 06/16/2000 - 8:18am
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PEANUT OIL is NOT safe for some of us who are PA....and I thank god that the media included that!!! Despite what some doctors have advised....I've gone to the emergency room after french fries in peanut oil......so better to "over inform" than to under inform.

Posted on: Tue, 03/28/2000 - 6:04am
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pWhich type of peanut oil was it? There are two kinds: cold-pressed and refined. One is supposedly safe and the other is NOT. Do you know which kind it was? If the label doesn't specify, DON'T use it!!!/p

Posted on: Tue, 03/28/2000 - 8:40am
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pI don't trust ANY peanut ingrediant.... the consequences are just too severe. I won't let my pa son have any kind of peanut oil./p

Posted on: Tue, 03/28/2000 - 9:01am
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pI think all of us have heard the pros and cons concerning peanut oil. My family has eaten in restaurants that use peanut oil without a problem. My PA son orders something that is not deep fried (of course). I would never attempt to give him anything fried in peanut oil, though. Also, we all wash our hands when we're done eating if peanut oil is used. I was given a list of ingredients and foods to avoid from my allergist when my son was first diagnosed....he included peanut oil. He explained the imported versus domestic controversy and just advised us to totally avoid it. We followed the advice successfully./p

Posted on: Tue, 03/28/2000 - 10:54pm
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pI don't know which kind it was. We did wash our hands and were careful, etc. She did not eat anything fried from there./p

Posted on: Fri, 03/19/1999 - 1:41pm
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Hi Mary! Thought you might be interested in this site. They had an article on peanut oil you may have already seen. (You're very well read.) [url="http://www.anaphylaxis.org.uk/whom.html"]http://www.anaphylaxis.org.uk/whom.html[/url]

Posted on: Sat, 06/05/1999 - 5:00am
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This thread is hasn't been used in awhile but I am just now reading it. I've always gone along with FAN's statement that refined peanut oil is safe to eat. We've been living life accordingly for the past three years. My daughter has probably eaten at chick-fil-about twenty times without a reaction. She has had several airborne peanut reactions and reactions to foods with peanut flour (her preschool inadvertantly fed her a cheap assorted cookie without reading the label.) The website: [url="http://www.anapylaxis.org"]http://www.anapylaxis.org[/url] agrees that eating peanut oil (refined) is safe. The only way to show that it is 100% safe is to test every peanut allergic individual. I feel comfortable going by that advice. Does anyone agree-or should I rethink my thinking? A mom from Paducah

Posted on: Sat, 06/05/1999 - 9:20pm
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My allergist informed me that peanut oil (hot-pressed) has not caused any allergic reactions in peanut allergic persons. However, many foreign countries produce cold-pressed peanut oil and companies in the U.S. may purchase it. Cold-pressed peanut oil could cause a reaction because the peanut proteins are not heated and broken down during manufacturing. There could be enough of the protein to cause a reaction. There is really no way to easily tell if a food manufacturer is using hot or cold-pressed peanut oil so I avoid peanut oil products for this reason.
Christine

Posted on: Sun, 06/06/1999 - 10:20am
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Does heat really destry the peanut proteins and make them non-allergic/ If this where they case them roasted peanuts would be non-allergic?

Posted on: Mon, 06/07/1999 - 4:41am
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No, heat does not break down the protein in peanut. This protein is one of THE most stable of all proteins which is why it is such a problem. I don't know why "hot-pressed" peanut oil is okay. I'm not quite sure what "hot-pressed" means except that it is some type of manufacturing process to extract the oil. Maybe it uses heats higher than are normally achieved in normal manufacturing or food preparation. Maybe we need to do more research on this peanut oil issue.
Christine

Posted on: Sat, 01/06/2001 - 2:44pm
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I know that this is an older thread but I did find a study that discusses the use of peanut oil and testing in allergic people
It states
"Randomised, double blind, crossover challenge study of allergenicity of peanut oils in subjects allergic to peanuts
Jonathan O'B Hourihane, clinical research fellow,a
Simon J Bedwani, medical student,a
Taraneh P Dean, senior research fellow,a John O Warner, professor a
a University Department of Child Health Mailpoint 803 Southampton General Hospital Southampton SO16 6YD
Correspondence and reprint requests to: Dr Hourihane
Objective: To determine the in vivo allergenicity of two grades of peanut oil for a large group of subjects with proved allergy to peanuts.
Design: Double blind, crossover food challenge with crude peanut oil and refined peanut oil.
Setting: Dedicated clinical investigation unit in a university hospital.
Subjects: 60 subjects allergic to peanuts; allergy was confirmed by challenge tests.
Outcome measures: Allergic reaction to the tested peanut oils
Results: None of the 60 subjects reacted to the refined oil; six (10%) reacted to the crude oil. Supervised peanut challenge caused considerably less severe reactions than subjects had reported previously.
Conclusions: Crude peanut oil caused allergic reactions in 10% of allergic subjects studied and should continue to be avoided. Refined peanut oil did not pose a risk to any of the subjects. It would be reasonable to recommend a change in labelling to distinguish refined from crude peanut oil.
Key messages
Peanut (groundnut) allergy is the most common cause of deaths related to food allergy. Peanut oil is often suspected of causing reactions to meals in which a more obvious source of peanut cannot be found
Refined peanut oil is odourless and flavourless and is commonly used in catering. Crude peanut oil, which is known to contain considerable amounts of protein is used only rarely, when a peanut flavour is deliberately required
In vivo challenges of 60 subjects with proved peanut allergy showed no reaction to refined peanut oil, but six (10%) reacted to the crude peanut oil
If refined peanut oil is used properly and is not reused after cooking peanuts, it seems to be safe for most people with peanut allergy; crude oil represents a risk
The confusing use of the term groundnut oil should be stopped, and food labelling should distinguish between refined and crude oils"
Hope this clarifies a bit ...
Sharon

Posted on: Fri, 03/19/1999 - 1:41pm
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Hi Mary! Thought you might be interested in this site. They had an article on peanut oil you may have already seen. (You're very well read.) [url="http://www.anaphylaxis.org.uk/whom.html"]http://www.anaphylaxis.org.uk/whom.html[/url]

Posted on: Sat, 06/05/1999 - 5:00am
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This thread is hasn't been used in awhile but I am just now reading it. I've always gone along with FAN's statement that refined peanut oil is safe to eat. We've been living life accordingly for the past three years. My daughter has probably eaten at chick-fil-about twenty times without a reaction. She has had several airborne peanut reactions and reactions to foods with peanut flour (her preschool inadvertantly fed her a cheap assorted cookie without reading the label.) The website: [url="http://www.anapylaxis.org"]http://www.anapylaxis.org[/url] agrees that eating peanut oil (refined) is safe. The only way to show that it is 100% safe is to test every peanut allergic individual. I feel comfortable going by that advice. Does anyone agree-or should I rethink my thinking? A mom from Paducah

Posted on: Sat, 06/05/1999 - 9:20pm
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My allergist informed me that peanut oil (hot-pressed) has not caused any allergic reactions in peanut allergic persons. However, many foreign countries produce cold-pressed peanut oil and companies in the U.S. may purchase it. Cold-pressed peanut oil could cause a reaction because the peanut proteins are not heated and broken down during manufacturing. There could be enough of the protein to cause a reaction. There is really no way to easily tell if a food manufacturer is using hot or cold-pressed peanut oil so I avoid peanut oil products for this reason.
Christine

Posted on: Sun, 06/06/1999 - 10:20am
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Does heat really destry the peanut proteins and make them non-allergic/ If this where they case them roasted peanuts would be non-allergic?

Posted on: Mon, 06/07/1999 - 4:41am
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No, heat does not break down the protein in peanut. This protein is one of THE most stable of all proteins which is why it is such a problem. I don't know why "hot-pressed" peanut oil is okay. I'm not quite sure what "hot-pressed" means except that it is some type of manufacturing process to extract the oil. Maybe it uses heats higher than are normally achieved in normal manufacturing or food preparation. Maybe we need to do more research on this peanut oil issue.
Christine

Posted on: Sat, 01/06/2001 - 2:44pm
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I know that this is an older thread but I did find a study that discusses the use of peanut oil and testing in allergic people
It states
"Randomised, double blind, crossover challenge study of allergenicity of peanut oils in subjects allergic to peanuts
Jonathan O'B Hourihane, clinical research fellow,a
Simon J Bedwani, medical student,a
Taraneh P Dean, senior research fellow,a John O Warner, professor a
a University Department of Child Health Mailpoint 803 Southampton General Hospital Southampton SO16 6YD
Correspondence and reprint requests to: Dr Hourihane
Objective: To determine the in vivo allergenicity of two grades of peanut oil for a large group of subjects with proved allergy to peanuts.
Design: Double blind, crossover food challenge with crude peanut oil and refined peanut oil.
Setting: Dedicated clinical investigation unit in a university hospital.
Subjects: 60 subjects allergic to peanuts; allergy was confirmed by challenge tests.
Outcome measures: Allergic reaction to the tested peanut oils
Results: None of the 60 subjects reacted to the refined oil; six (10%) reacted to the crude oil. Supervised peanut challenge caused considerably less severe reactions than subjects had reported previously.
Conclusions: Crude peanut oil caused allergic reactions in 10% of allergic subjects studied and should continue to be avoided. Refined peanut oil did not pose a risk to any of the subjects. It would be reasonable to recommend a change in labelling to distinguish refined from crude peanut oil.
Key messages
Peanut (groundnut) allergy is the most common cause of deaths related to food allergy. Peanut oil is often suspected of causing reactions to meals in which a more obvious source of peanut cannot be found
Refined peanut oil is odourless and flavourless and is commonly used in catering. Crude peanut oil, which is known to contain considerable amounts of protein is used only rarely, when a peanut flavour is deliberately required
In vivo challenges of 60 subjects with proved peanut allergy showed no reaction to refined peanut oil, but six (10%) reacted to the crude peanut oil
If refined peanut oil is used properly and is not reused after cooking peanuts, it seems to be safe for most people with peanut allergy; crude oil represents a risk
The confusing use of the term groundnut oil should be stopped, and food labelling should distinguish between refined and crude oils"
Hope this clarifies a bit ...
Sharon

Posted on: Wed, 10/17/2001 - 11:53am
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The peanut allergy is to the peanut protein. Therefore, a pure refined oil may have no protein = no reaction.
However, I will never eat anything with peanut oil. There is no guarantee that the oil will be 100% protein free, any even a trace of protein could cause a reaction. Any many peanut oils do contain protein...
So I would recommend avoiding peanut oil to be safe.. I won't go near it myself.

Posted on: Sat, 11/24/2001 - 4:29pm
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I'm pretty severely allergic to peanuts, but love Tim's Cascade Potato chips. I haven't had any problem with them. I ate some sunflower seeds roasted in peanut oil just today. A good many Chinese restaurants cook in peanut oil. You may be getting it by accident.
A much more disturbing idea was a notice I read a while back about the peanut growers lobby wanting to market "high protein" peanut flour to use in crackers and breads. That would be bad.
On a somewhat related subject: I once ate some "peanut soup" by accident at a Chinese restaurant where I was working. A waiter there told me to eat some Pineapple. It alleviated the symptoms big time. Years later, I mentioned this to a friend who had majored in Chemistry at Harvard. She told me there is an enzyme in pineapple that destroys the protien in peanuts. I told this to a severe peanut allergy friend of mine. Now, like me, he carries a can of pineapple juice in his car. He has had a few episodes, and swears by it. I have mentioned it to allergists before, but they disclaim any knowledge of this.

Posted on: Fri, 06/01/2001 - 2:32pm
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They aren't!
I mean, no, the OIL is always safe... at least in theory. The problem is that we live in a world where nothing's perfect, including processing an oil from its source.
As long as the protein itself isn't present, you won't have a problem, but peanut is a really risky thing to gamble with! Even after the oil has been heated to very high temperatures, the protein component remains highly allergenic (this is one of the primary characteristics of a highly allergenic protein of any kind). In a highly allergic person, the amount of peanut protein needed to cover this period . could be 100 times the amount needed to cause anaphylaxis.
Not a good risk, but one which IS still within some people's comfort zones. (Not mine, however!) Hot processing actually can make the oil contamination problem worse, but cold pressed oils are extremely dangerous too, because the higher pressures needed can cause greater protein transfer to the oil. Even with a manufacturer whose products are reasonably safe (Planters was reputedly so for a long time)...well, we all know here manufacturers can change methods at whim! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img]
Sorry for the earlier error via omission!
[This message has been edited by Corvallis Mom (edited June 02, 2001).]
[This message has been edited by Corvallis Mom (edited June 02, 2001).]
[This message has been edited by Corvallis Mom (edited June 02, 2001).]

Posted on: Fri, 06/01/2001 - 2:44pm
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Someone else posted this link earlier and it has great information on peanut oil.
the article states that "Unrefined or '[b]cold pressed[/b]' peanut oil, or 'gourmet oil' with peanut material added for flavour are dangerous.
[url="http://www.user.globalnet.co.uk/~aair/nuts.htm#PNUTOIL"]http://www.user.globalnet.co.uk/~aair/nuts.htm#PNUTOIL[/url]
Sue in Sunny Arizona
[This message has been edited by Sue (edited June 02, 2001).]

Posted on: Fri, 06/01/2001 - 11:26pm
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im not highly allergic though i was tested as being a 3 at like 8 years old and since then i think its gotten even less. I remember kids would eat peanut butter and jelly near me and i'd feel like throwing up but now that stuff doesnt bother me i just hate the smell out of conditioning =).

Posted on: Tue, 02/17/2004 - 11:11pm
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reraising.

Posted on: Mon, 06/07/2004 - 11:03pm
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reraising.

Posted on: Tue, 01/30/2001 - 9:51pm
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TELL YOUR DOCTOR HE NEEDS MORE EDUCATION! SOme types of peanut oil CAN KILL YOUR CHILD! How can these doctors be so stupid?
Since there is no way of knowing what type you are injesting.... (hot or cold pressed...) be safe and avoid them all!!!!From what I understand....(Hot pressed goes through a heating process that can the proteins that cause reactions..(CAN>>>>If it is done correctly) Cold pressed does not go through this process and can be fatal to a peanut allergic person! check on search in this site, to find out more info that has been posted. Call a QUALIFIED ALLERGIST and ask.... then let your doctor KNOW he is handing out ignorant and deadly information!!!!

Posted on: Tue, 01/30/2001 - 10:31pm
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Gabrielle I totally am with you,and another thing is that even if there are certain oil he can have it may get to confusing and the child may except something off limits without knowing. SAY NO to any peanut oil.

Posted on: Wed, 01/31/2001 - 12:17am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Claire, I agree also. If I told my child "absolutely NO peanut products" and then said in the next breath..."oh but peanut oil is okay," he would look at me like I was crazy. It is just too confusing. We stay away from anything that mentions peanut...peanuts; peanut oil and peanut flour.
------------------
Stay Safe.

Posted on: Thu, 02/01/2001 - 4:39am
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I also recieved information from my doctor that peanut oil - refined - would be ok because refining(sp?) it kills off the protien that causes the allergy. HOWEVER - in the same article that stated this, it also said that some peanut oils may not be properly refined - so DON'T TAKE ANY CHANCES.

Posted on: Mon, 06/07/2004 - 11:07pm
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reraising

Posted on: Fri, 01/26/2001 - 3:25am
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Hello. There is alot posted on this. If you use the search function and search for "peanut oil" you will find alot of relevant information. Andy

Posted on: Sat, 12/21/2002 - 12:25pm
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Nancy,
If she's allergic to peanuts, she would react to peanuts in all forms, not just peanut oil. In fact, heat-pressed peanut oil doesn't contain peanut protein and people with peanut allergy won't react to it (though most people with PA wouldn't want to take that risk). Cold-pressed peanut oil DOES contain peanut protein and will cause a reaction in PA people.
You don't say when she last had peanuts. If it was before the peanut oil, maybe she has developed a peanut allergy and her reaction to the peanut oil is because it's cold pressed. She should be tested for peanut allergy because it is life threatening and if she's allergic to peanuts you need to learn to completely avoid peanuts and carry an epi pen.
If you suspect peanut allergy you need to stop feeding her all nuts, including the almond butter. Most nuts and nut butters are contaminated with trace amounts of peanuts because of the manufacturing process. Peanut allergy can be fatal. Take her off the almond butter NOW and get her tested.
As far as dealing with doctors, I suggest you tell the allergist she got blotchy from peanut oil and leave it at that. Don't talk about the hyper behavior and all those other foods--I think the doctor is dismissing your concerns because those are not typical allergy symptoms, more likely to be signs of food intolerance.
The short answer to the question of whether she can be allergic to peanut oil and not peanuts: NO. If she's truly reacting to peanut oil she is in grave danger and you'd better get an allergist. Good luck.

Posted on: Sun, 12/22/2002 - 1:23am
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Nancy, I agree with Sandra. Keep her off all nut products, and get her tested as soon as possible. If another allergist refuses to test her, find one that will. Don't give up. Be very careful what you feed her, you will be amazed what foods contain or may contain peanut oil. Read all food labels very carefully. This could be a matter of life or death. Good luck

Posted on: Sun, 12/22/2002 - 11:06am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

I was at a lecture recently by Dr. Woods (? who wrote Peanut Allergy Answer Book...)and also seem to recall seeing in some recent literature by FAAN that the recommendation is to now stay away from ALL peanut oil as they have found significant traces of peanut in products from both types of processing...

Posted on: Sun, 12/22/2002 - 12:09pm
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Joined: 10/12/2002 - 09:00

For what it's worth, here is what I recommend:
1. I would ask your pediatrician, or a new pediatrician, for a referral to an allergist. Just be persistant until you get the referral. You will need a referral or your insurance company won't pay.
2. Look for an allergist that is board certified in allergy, immunology, and pediatrics. Try to find an allergist that specializes in food allergy. You may find this website helpful if you're in the US: [url="http://www.aaaai.org/physref/default.stm"]http://www.aaaai.org/physref/default.stm[/url] If you have to drive farther to get a specialist in food allergy, it will be worth the drive.
3. I agree with Sandra Y, don't mention the behaviour issues, because the medical community right now doesn't believe that allergies cause behavior problems, ear infections, or colic. (Moms of food allergic children may know different). Just describe the blotchyness after exposure to peanut oil. Also, tell them if there is a history of any type of allergies in you or your husband's family (hay fever, eczema, insect stings, dust, asthma, etc.) because this would put your child at a higher risk of developing food allergies.
4. Avoid all peanuts, peanut oil and tree nuts until your child is tested. Peanut oil can be cross contaminated with peanuts when it is produced. Also, almost 40 % of peanut allergic individuals develop a tree nut allergy.
5. Until your child is tested, be sure to carry Children's Benadryl with you everywhere. If you have blotchyness on face and arms again, you should probably head to the hospital (call pediatrician's office for authorization).
The thing about peanut allergy reactions is that they can be inconsistent. You might have hives (blotchyness) one time, and anaphylaxis the next time. Also, its possible to be able to eat peanuts or peanut oil for years without a problem, and then becoming allergic.
Good luck, and let us know how everything turns out.

Posted on: Sun, 05/12/2002 - 8:55pm
kcmom's picture
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Joined: 12/18/2001 - 09:00

Honestly, I have been told to stay away from peanut oil too. Because, there is no way to gaurantee it was heated to the proper temp that removes the protein that causes a reaction. My child has also, before we knew she had the allergy, eaten french fries fried in peanut oil and had no reaction. I consider this lucky. We just have no way to make sure that all the protein was removed when it was processed, so for me, I still consider it unsafe.
kcmom

Posted on: Mon, 05/13/2002 - 5:42pm
gw_mom3's picture
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Joined: 02/14/2000 - 09:00

I'm pretty sure I read somewhere (probably here) that some PA people are sensitive/anaphylactic to peanut oil-not the cold processed either. I think for my kids, I don't want to take that chance. Glad to know some aren't having reactions though! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Gale

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