Peanut Challenge Test

Posted on: Tue, 12/19/2000 - 1:19pm
gary breen's picture
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Our 6 1/2 year old son has just had his first peanut challenge. A small swab in his bottom lip produced some spots on his arms and redness around his lips but disappeared shortly after. Later on a 1/8th of a teaspoon was put into a small slice of meat pie. He could not taste it but complained of a burning feeling almost straight away in his throat. More red blotches and about 40mins later, he became hot and then was violently ill. A 15mg dose of Phenergan settled all symptoms, thankfully.
By doing the test it was a good demonstration that he won't collapse in minutes of having a small amount of peanut but we still are very wary and will never venture out without the Epi-pen.
If you are debating about the Challenge, do it for your own peace of mind, we are happy we done it and are thinking of testing some plain dry biscuits that are labelled "may contain..." to broaden his food range. I'm telling you this because he did have a anaphalactic reaction a 4 years ago and almost lost him. Since then we've stuck to the very basic foods and our other children have missed out on alot of foods they could have. Finally, give it a go, you'll know for sure.

Posted on: Tue, 12/19/2000 - 2:04pm
Chris PeanutAllergy Com's picture
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Joined: 04/25/2001 - 09:00

Hello,
You wrote>>
By doing the test it was a good demonstration that he won't collapse in minutes of having a small amount of peanut>>
What are you basing this on? Where you told this by the doctor?
------------------
Stay Safe,
[email]"Chris@PeanutAllergy.Com"[/email]

Posted on: Tue, 12/19/2000 - 2:27pm
gary breen's picture
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Joined: 12/19/2000 - 09:00

[quote]Originally posted by Chris PeanutAllergy Com:
[b]Hello,
You wrote>>
By doing the test it was a good demonstration that he won't collapse in minutes of having a small amount of peanut>>
What are you basing this on? Where you told this by the doctor?
[/b]
Hi Chris,
The Consultant Paediatrician from the Department of Allergy told us. We have been seeing the same doctor for 6 yrs now trust him dearly. You do have to remember that everybody is different and it may not suit everyone but it has been right for us.

Posted on: Tue, 12/19/2000 - 11:06pm
latymom's picture
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Joined: 05/21/2000 - 09:00

I thought that EACH reaction can be different, so therefore, the fact your child had just burning in the throat and hives doesn't mean he can't have a anaphalactic reaction later.? Also, it sounds like he had a horrible experience with the vomiting etc. Why would you want to take the risk of putting him through that? You know he's been anaphalacyic in the past, so you have to assume that he could be again at any time. What are your reasons for giving him a "may contain" food? Please, don't think I'm critisizing your parenting skills, we all do everything for the best interest of our children, but I can't see how doing these various challenges are doing him any good. I'm sure you'd feel awful if he really did have a full blown anaphalactic reaction during one of these challenges. What was your reason for doing it in the first place? Did you have an indication that he'd outgrown it? Just curious.

Posted on: Wed, 12/20/2000 - 12:46am
BENSMOM's picture
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Joined: 05/20/2000 - 09:00

Gary, thanks for posting about the challenge. I'm always curious about how that's done. One thing to think about for the "may contain" biscuits, is that the batch you test him with may not contain peanuts, but a different batch may. Is there a way to test the biscuit to see if it actually does contain a trace amt of peanut? Good luck to you.

Posted on: Wed, 12/20/2000 - 6:18am
gary breen's picture
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Joined: 12/19/2000 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by latymom:
[b]I thought that EACH reaction can be different, so therefore, the fact your child had just burning in the throat and hives doesn't mean he can't have a anaphalactic reaction later.? Also, it sounds like he had a horrible experience with the vomiting etc. Why would you want to take the risk of putting him through that? You know he's been anaphalacyic in the past, so you have to assume that he could be again at any time. What are your reasons for giving him a "may contain" food? Please, don't think I'm critisizing your parenting skills, we all do everything for the best interest of our children, but I can't see how doing these various challenges are doing him any good. I'm sure you'd feel awful if he really did have a full blown anaphalactic reaction during one of these challenges. What was your reason for doing it in the first place? Did you have an indication that he'd outgrown it? Just curious.[/b]
Latymum, Alex had a prick test in July that was more promising than the previous test,so the Paediatrician suggested we do the CHALLENGE.He is also the reason we are enquiring about the "may contain labels".He thought if we gave Alex a tiny amount of biscuit and watched for reactions the same way they done the challenge we would be more aware of what he can and can't have.We wouldn't be giving him enough to make him sick.After the challeng we know he can tollerate a small amount of peanut butter.As you know it takes alot of peanuts to make a very small amount of peanut butter.AS for our parenting:Alex as one bad reaction in six and a half years and that was by a professional child minder[apparently]That was Alex's first and last day of child care.
HE is now attendins school and every little thing the school does with food I'm there.
So I know we are wonderful PARENTS.
Alexmum...

Posted on: Wed, 12/20/2000 - 6:33am
gary breen's picture
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Joined: 12/19/2000 - 09:00

[quote]Originally posted by BENSMOM:
[b]Gary, thanks for posting about the challenge. I'm always curious about how that's done. One thing to think about for the "may contain" biscuits, is that the batch you test him with may not contain peanuts, but a different batch may. Is there a way to test the biscuit to see if it actually does contain a trace amt of peanut? Good luck to you. [/b]
Bensmom, we understand that we would have to test the first biscuit of every packet to know if that packet is ok. It sounds horrible to do, but we used to give him the same biscuit and then the manufacturers startd to print the warning on them. I am waiting for a reply from one manufacturer about not having nuts at a particular plant which has a special prefix on the "use by" stamp that identifies that plant site. Just have to wait and see if they do reply .
Gary

Posted on: Wed, 12/20/2000 - 10:17am
latymom's picture
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Joined: 05/21/2000 - 09:00

Gary, like I said before, I'm not challenging your parenting, I'm only questioning the idea of these peanut challenges. I guess I'm confused. I thought that even small amounts of peanut protein could cause an anaphalctic reaction, maybe not the first, or second, or third time but at any time. Therefore it sounds very scary to me to take the chance of giving a child even the smallest amount if it could pose this kind of risk. I've often wondered how serious my daughter has this allergy. Could she have an anaphalactic reaction? But all the doctors I've spoken to say there is no way to know. If your child has had an anaphalactic reaction before I would have thought he's capable of having one again. Your doctor actually recommends you give your child a little bit of peanut products at a time to see what happens? And he knows your child's last reaction included vomiting, hives etc.?

Posted on: Wed, 12/20/2000 - 4:14pm
gary breen's picture
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Joined: 12/19/2000 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by latymom:
[b]Gary, like I said before, I'm not challenging your parenting, I'm only questioning the idea of these peanut challenges. I guess I'm confused. I thought that even small amounts of peanut protein could cause an anaphalctic reaction, maybe not the first, or second, or third time but at any time. Therefore it sounds very scary to me to take the chance of giving a child even the smallest amount if it could pose this kind of risk. I've often wondered how serious my daughter has this allergy. Could she have an anaphalactic reaction? But all the doctors I've spoken to say there is no way to know. If your child has had an anaphalactic reaction before I would have thought he's capable of having one again. Your doctor actually recommends you give your child a little bit of peanut products at a time to see what happens? And he knows your child's last reaction included vomiting, hives etc.?[/b]
Latymum,The thought of giving Alex any-thing with peanut protein in it is very scary to us.That is why we are asking people in the same predicement their expeirences.For the past six years we've been told to steer clear of nuts;Now we're being told to give things a try.It's very hard for us to get our head around.As things are now we feel in control.If we throw nuts into our lives things will be very different.The most basic food products are getting hard to buy.School snacks are a night mare to buy;there are hardly any biscuits we can buy.And that makes you question if the biscuits we are buying are labeled correctly.Muesli bars and chocolate are just plain off the shopping list.I'm curious to hear how you go shopping for your daughter[children]?Sorry I am very sensitive about the whole parenting thing.I'm sick of people thinking that I'm over-reacting. Kerry[Alex's mum].

Posted on: Wed, 12/20/2000 - 10:57pm
Dave's picture
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Joined: 12/11/2000 - 09:00

Please be careful.....I have had PA for all of my 60 years and I know that each encounter, (2 per year roughly) is different. One test with a little peanut does not mean much. By the way, it is possible to have a full and productive life even with the peanut devil lurking everywhere.

Posted on: Thu, 12/21/2000 - 12:04am
latymom's picture
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Joined: 05/21/2000 - 09:00

I find shopping fairly simple actually. We've been living with this diagnosis for almost 2 years now and it does get easier I think. When I shop, I simply read the labels and buy name brands that I can trust. I don't buy from the bakery, and am careful at the deli. I use common sense. How about making homemade buscuits? I make a lot of cookies and things homemade so I can be sure they're safe. The thing I guess that I don't understand is that you're kind of playing Russian Roulette. You never know what the next experience with peanut will be and if you are deliberatly giving your child this, fully knowing he is allergic to peanuts, than he is MORE apt to have a serious reaction, even if you are monitoring it. What exactly are you trying to accomplish? Do you want to find out HOW allergic he is? Well, he's had anaphalxis before.....so he's anaphalactic. You said before that people think you overreact, in this case I think you might be underreacting. Don't trust everything doctors tell you. My friends pediatrician told her the same thing as you and her daughter ended up pretty sick because of it. Both my daughters allergists would NEVER recommend doing challenges of these sorts, particularly at home and not in an emergency room or doctors office. All I'm saying is, be careful, maybe even seek the advice of another allergist. Believe me, I hear what your saying about you'd like to know what your child CAN eat without getting too sick. But any amount of sick is awful for a kid, even if its just hives, nevermind vomiting etc. I wish only the best for you and your child.

Posted on: Thu, 12/21/2000 - 12:18am
Head Cook's picture
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Joined: 11/19/2000 - 09:00

We have never done a peanut challenge. It is our understanding that because every reaction is different, if the challenge produces any reaction at all and there is a history of anaphylaxis, there is always the chance of it being full blown. My son reacts so big to contact and smell at 9 years old that the allergist said to accept this as lifelong.

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