Peanut Allergy Kit

Posted on: Fri, 03/10/2000 - 2:31pm
Renee's picture
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Joined: 09/02/1999 - 09:00

My PA daughter will be attending a full day Kindergarten program in the fall. My husband and I have met with the (private) school Principal, nurse and other staff members on several occasions to train them on Epipen use, symptoms of Anaphylaxis, developing an emergancy plan........ They requested that I provide a "Peanut Allergy Kit" that could be put in a small pack and passed along when she changes rooms (ie music, gym, recess). The problem was that the Benadryl bottles are too big, chewables could be a problem if she is having trouble swallowing, a smaller bottle is not available (I even asked my doctor if he had any samples) and it has to be in its origional bottle. The doctor was able to perscribe a small bottle of Prelone, Benadryl Liquid, and Epi Pen Jr for the pack. This allowed smaller child proof bottles with pharmacy labels. Forfilling all the schools requirements. I would have never known I could get this if I had not asked.

Posted on: Sat, 03/11/2000 - 1:44am
canada's picture
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Joined: 02/19/2000 - 09:00

pThere are a few other things you may want to add to the kit.You can include in the Fanny pack a copy of the Medical Alert Response form, it will provide quick explanation of what a reaction is and outline immmediate treatment, along with name of the child, contact numbers etc.. You may also want to include pay phone money. Useful when travelling. Consider the copy of the hospital card or other such hospital admin. numbers. Here we have Medicare Cards (carte soliel) that way treatment can't be delayed. When you child is in 1st grade this may prove impossible to get them to agree to carry all that on them so you should consider the epi belt, the single, After having seen children role on the ground and the epi is still in one piece I for one am convinced. The back up, anti histamine paper work etc. is in the lunch pack. The back up epi is in the school office. Just a suggestion./p

Posted on: Sat, 03/11/2000 - 11:46pm
Chris LaPlaca's picture
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Joined: 12/22/1999 - 09:00

pI have an allergy kit that travels with my daughter. It's actually a pretty cheap make-up kit I got at a drugstore. It has 2 zipper pouches: 1 for medicine and 1 for contact info, insurance info, etc. I like this because it is clear plastic, so it's real obvious what is in the kit. I printed Rebecca's picture from my computer onto the info sheet and this faces out from one of the zipper compartments. So one side has her picture and EMERGENCY MEDICAL INFO in Red, and the other side is totally clear so you can see the Pen Benedryl./p

Posted on: Sun, 03/12/2000 - 4:47am
robert's picture
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Joined: 03/12/2000 - 09:00

phi. it is wonderful that your school will allow children of PA carry their prescribed med's. In NY that however is not the case. It's ironic how a child of PA can die within seconds of exposure and have to wait for someone to get the nurse, the nurse get the medicine out of the locked cabinet and then reach the child. You gave me hope that it is not like this all over and maybe with enough help we can change this state law./p

Posted on: Sun, 03/12/2000 - 5:57am
canada's picture
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Joined: 02/19/2000 - 09:00

probert, you have got to be joking, locked epis? Thats like soooooo dangerous.You have got to get on these people and fix that ASAP.br /
With proper training the staff and the kids can be made to realize that this is serious and that there is A BETTER WAY OF DOING THINGS. The Canadian School board Association has a great handbook on anaphylaxis., I know it's canadian but you should still read it and it may give you some great ideas for getting this set right. Good luck./p

Posted on: Sun, 03/12/2000 - 10:38am
Tlarrab's picture
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Joined: 02/13/2000 - 09:00

pHello Robert-/p
pI am from NY and an ex-preschool teacher. I have a 19 month old son with PA. I understand your concerns about your epi being in a locked cabinet in the nurses office. In the case of PA, and how important it is to have the epi asap, this is ridiculous. I am sorry that you have to worry about this and hopefully this will change. I have been told by other parents that asthmatics can carry there inhalers. Does anyone know anything about this. If this is true then I feel there is hope for anaphylactics. My son will not attend public school unless something changes with this one. His epi goes where he goes!/p

Posted on: Sun, 03/12/2000 - 1:19pm
Renee's picture
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Joined: 09/02/1999 - 09:00

pRobertbr /
My daughter is not permitted to carry her medication, but it is in a pack that the teachers pass from class to class. When she is older they will let her be responsible for passing it from teacher to teacher. /p
pChrisbr /
I too put the meds in a clear pack. I have typed up an Emergency Health Care Plan using the FAN sample, added her picture via digital camera, and laminated it into a luggage tag which is on the handle of the bag. I carry a cell phone at all times, and I never go more then a 10 min. drive from the school. I will add a calling card just incase./p

Posted on: Mon, 03/13/2000 - 2:14am
KatiesMom's picture
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Joined: 03/01/2000 - 09:00

pRobert, I also live in NY (just north of Albany). I have just registed my daughter for kindergarten. As long as I have a doctor's note, my daughter can carry her epi-pen with her at all times. There's no NY law which says she can't. You might be able to fight this with your school district/p

Posted on: Mon, 03/13/2000 - 3:41am
robert's picture
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Joined: 03/12/2000 - 09:00

pthank you all for your wonderful input on the issue of carrying epi's in school. I will undoubtedly be contacting the school. My two sons are also asthmatics and are not allowed to carry inhalers. I will also be looking into that. I can't tell you what wonderfull idea it is to have an emergency kit with your child. I carry one at home for all 4 of my children who have multiple medical problems and detailed medication regimin. I will let you know what I find out. This board has to be the most wonderful thing in the world thank you all./p

Posted on: Tue, 03/14/2000 - 2:48am
Tlarrab's picture
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Joined: 02/13/2000 - 09:00

pAnother reply to Robert-/p
pThe best thing for you to do is call the school. I spoke to the elementary school nurse this morning in my district and she told me there is one kindergartener this year with PA. The child wears a fanny pack with her epi wear ever she goes and other info (already suggested in this thread). The nurse told me that the child's Doctor prescribed the use of the fanny with the epi on her as being medically necessary. This is something worth looking into.br /
As for my school district I was glad to hear how the staff treats this serious. All staff has been train on administering the epi. In case something happens in the hall. The nurse explained all steps the school is taking to keep the Pa child safe. I was impressed. The school nurse also has a Pa child so she understands the everyday worry and risks associated with this condition./p
pForgot to ask about the inhalers. Also, I went to [url="http://www.nysed.gov/rscs/fctnurs.html"]www.nysed.gov/rscs/fctnurs.html[/url] read about health related activities for children in the school setting. This may be of interest to you. Good Luck./p

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