peanut allergy

Posted on: Fri, 09/29/2000 - 2:14pm
chinkie's picture
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i have a granddaught that has allergy to peanuts. what do we do to get the school to has peanut free tables and that her class also.people is not aware how bad this is.
i would be so thank for any information.
wanda
e-mail address
[email]gwbush1@gte.net[/email]

Posted on: Fri, 09/29/2000 - 2:21pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Chinkie, you should check out the different threads under Schools. But also, I have to ask, do you live in America or Canada or someplace different? Things are very different re PA in both countries so it depends on what country you're living in what information you really want to get. Please let us know. Best wishes!
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Posted on: Fri, 09/29/2000 - 3:22pm
chinkie's picture
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yes we live in amrica. but it seem people
do not understand how bad this is . my daughter is a teacher , she was talking to the school nurse and come home very upset that these people do not want to make any
special changes to help these kids. these
people need information and we would be very thankful for any infor. on this.
thanks chinkie

Posted on: Sat, 09/30/2000 - 4:18am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Chinkie, since you're online you have quite a few good places that you can find information that you can print off and your daughter could possibly take it into your granddaughter's school so they realize the seriousness of the allergy. First of all, since you do live in America, does your granddaughter have a 504 Plan? I'm not really clear what that is because I'm Canadian, but if you go to the Schools discussion section there should be something about the 504 Plan in there. This may be your first step. There is one website and although it is Canadian, it provides links to a lot of different sites that can provide you with information. It's [url="http://www.cadvision.com/allergy"]www.cadvision.com/allergy[/url] If you go there, you'll find a lot of different links where you can find school policies, information about PA, a link to this site even. I'd suggest first that you find out what a 504 Plan is exactly if your granddaughter doesn't already have one and then look up all the information you can. Then, you'll have to figure out what the school needs to be provided with. I'm fortunate where I live, in Canada, there was a school board policy in place that required my son's school to implement a "peanut free" classroom. Keep posting here though so hopefully other people can get in and help you sort this out too! Best wishes!
------------------

Posted on: Sat, 09/30/2000 - 11:33am
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I like the [url="http://www.cadvision.com/allergy/peanutfree.html"]www.cadvision.com/allergy/peanutfree.html[/url]
site too. If you print it out it says how
severe the problem can be. Also you can print out stuff from [url="http://www.oma.org/phealth/peanuts.htm"]www.oma.org/phealth/peanuts.htm[/url] This site
lists symptoms,a failure to prevent contact
with peanuts section, failure of institutions
section. These info sections should make things pretty clear. You can also get a note
from the doctor. Check out foodallergy.org
and look at the brochures they have. They
are really good. They have a teacher/parent
one which states what the school is responsible for in regard to your daughter's
safety.
tutions

Posted on: Thu, 03/01/2001 - 6:29am
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Hello, I'm actually not sure because we do not only deal with peanuts. ...but was wondering if you also have a milk allergy because of your name, cuz I know they definitely have milk products in the goldfish crackers.

Posted on: Thu, 03/01/2001 - 6:34am
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He just has a peanut allergy that I know of so far.

Posted on: Thu, 03/01/2001 - 7:38am
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Joined: 06/13/2000 - 09:00

For a short time, Goldfish contained the "may contain" or the "made in the same plant" warning. I haven't seen that warning lately - at least on the ones that I buy. I didn't buy them when they contained the warning, but do now again, and my son is okay with them.

Posted on: Thu, 03/01/2001 - 7:49am
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What flavor were the goldfish? My 19mth old twin pa girls eat them everyday (original, cheddar, pizza, parmesan). From this site I've learned that Pepperage Farm is a safe company that labels "may contain" when necessary.
I have also discovered that there is a goldfish snack/party mix that has nuts in it.
I would call the company with the info on the offending bag and see what they say.

Posted on: Fri, 03/02/2001 - 3:45am
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Don't the pizza flavored goldfish have peanut oil in them? That's what I thought.

Posted on: Fri, 03/02/2001 - 3:57am
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Mir
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Joined: 02/12/2001 - 09:00

latymom, I know companies can change ingredients at any time, but upon reading your comment I went to my cupboard! My package of Pizza Flavored Goldfish does NOT contain any peanut ingredients. The oils listed are "canola and/or soybean and/or cottonseed."
Miriam

Posted on: Fri, 03/02/2001 - 6:57am
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I know the Search engine is 'down' right now, but there is a thread under Manufacturers about Peppridge Farm and/or goldfish. There may even be several.
At one time the pizza ones were said to have had peanut oil, then the ingredients were changed.
Hope this helps.

Posted on: Fri, 03/02/2001 - 7:00am
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Joined: 10/08/2006 - 09:00

I've contacted Peppridge Farm twice in the last year. The first time I received a letter back from them saying that goldfish crackers are made on dedicated nut free lines. The second time, the told me exactly the same thing. The pizza flavored crackers no longer contain peanut oil. The crackers do contain anatto (artificial color) and I know many people are allergic to that, could that be it?

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2001 - 6:32am
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I would be most suspicious of the soybean oil, since soybean is in the legume family with peanuts. My son is allergic to both. I hope your child is feeling better!

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2001 - 8:46am
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Thank MJ mom. He is feel good now.

Posted on: Sat, 03/03/2001 - 9:30am
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Joined: 01/11/2001 - 09:00

Milk, I asked this same question a couple of months ago. My son ate some Pepperidge Farm goldfish crackers and immediately his lips and mouth area swelled up. He is allergic to milk, but had never had a reaction to the small amount in baked product. And even when he ingested straight milk, he did not react with facial swelling, so I posed the same question. The responses I received were similar to these here. Possibly in my son's case it was the milk that bothered him, but thought I would share that the goldfish gave us a scare also.

Posted on: Sat, 01/12/2002 - 12:37am
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Just wondering, since your kids have not had reactions, so you seem to have the take the right amount of precautions, what do you do about birthday parties? If one of your kids is invited to a birthday party where peanuts are being served, do you let them go? It seems like at birthday parties, kids are often running around with food and there is no hand washing. Just wondering how you handle this. Thanks.

Posted on: Sun, 01/13/2002 - 11:24pm
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Most of the birthday parties that we attend are given in honor of close friends. I can only ever remember going to one that peanuts were served. The mom put them up as soon as I said that Kate could'nt have them. She felt really bad. I always remind them to ask me if they can have something before they eat it. I always stay with them during the parties. After reading about reactions children have had, I thought maybe we had outgrown it. That is the reason I have had them re-tested. I was so sad that we had not. Has anyone gone to Dr. Wesley Burks at the Arkansas Children's Hospital? Thanks for your reply. I am new to this so I was afraid no-one would write anything back to me! Cammie

Posted on: Tue, 01/15/2002 - 2:56am
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Hi, I went to Arkansas Children's Hospital yesterday but just to get Will's blood drawn. We see Dr Melissa Graham here in Little Rock. My 13month old was just diagnosed yesterday, and I am a complete basket case. I would love to talk to you. Do you live in Little Rock? Wendy Musteen

Posted on: Tue, 01/15/2002 - 3:03am
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I live in Ar and would love to talk to you. We use Dr Melissa Graham at the Little Rock Allergy Clinic. My 13month old tested positive for Peanuts and Eggs yesterday. I need to talk to someone who is going through this.
Wendy Musteen

Posted on: Tue, 01/15/2002 - 3:50am
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Wendy,
I just left you a note, but I can't find it. I don't know where I posted it so if it turns up, this will be a repition.
I'm sorry about your little boy, but it will be o.k. It is just a way of life for us. I was mortified when Kate began school, but I have educated them about their allergy and what to do if a reaction occurs. I live in Booneville, MS. I heard about Arkansas Children's Hospital from a mutual friend whose children are also allergic to peanuts. I did'nt know anything about a peanut allegy until Kate was diagnosed with it. I pray daily for their safety and for my own peace of mind. I think your being upset is perfectly normal. I received an e-mail from Dr. Burks and I am going to take both children for an evaulation in his clinic. I will let you know when it is. You may have to give me directions. Educate yourself and practice common sense in every situation is the best advice I can give you. Kate has not had a reaction since she was three and had only one before then. In a report for school, she was to list something she ould change about herself. She said, " I am just a little girl, so I don't need to change anything yet.'' At this point I asked her about her peanut allergy and she said that she knew God wanted me to watch her extra careful. I had always told her that but I never knew if she understood it. Sorry this is so long. Write back soon!

Posted on: Tue, 01/15/2002 - 11:01am
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God has answered my prayers. I have been reading the topics in this site for some time. I have learned a lot and am thankful for everyone. My 10 year old son also goes to Dr. Melissa Graham in Little Rock, Arkansas.

Posted on: Tue, 01/15/2002 - 11:13am
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Cammie,
My name is Lisa. As I sit here reading your story about your children, my eyes welled up with tears at your daughters response that 'God just wanted you to watch her extra careful'. I just fell upon this website tonight looking for anything that I could on PA. I have a 17 month old daughter who was recently diagnosed with peanut, egg and soy allergies. Her peanut is the most worrisome to me - she was a 5.5 on the IgE class (out of 6). So extremely high levels of antibodies. I feel depressed knowing that her childhood won't be 'normal'. I know I will feel better eventually, and that we need to educate ourselves and take this head on. But, it is so scarey - life or death. I pray to God for guidance and for the chance for her to outgrow this allergy. I have been trying to find out info regarding breast feeding and PA. I ate alot of peanut butter while breastfeeding - could this have caused her allergy? I am so glad I found this site - I'm looking forward to building a network of others going through the same thing with their children....
Lisa

Posted on: Tue, 01/15/2002 - 11:37am
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Lisa-
I tried to breast feed with Kate and it did'nt work out. When I had Joseph, I did'nt even try. He is allergic also. I do not want you to think that I am being snobbish but Kate and Joseph are both extremley well-rounded children. They both have a great time wherever they are. They do not miss out on anything except eating peanuts and they would'nt touch one a mile away. I worried that children would not be kind about it, but it is quite the opposite. I have had parents tell me that their children would not bring any peanuts to school in their lunch boxes because it might make Kate or Joseph sick. I am so glad that I decided to post messages on here. I have already received blessings from doing so. I try to remember not to be compulsive, but to use common sense regarding this allergy. Write back soon! Cammie

Posted on: Tue, 01/15/2002 - 11:39am
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Neals Mom,
tell me about Dr. Graham-maybe I should go to her. I just want to go to someone who knows about peanut allergy exclusively. Thanks Cammie

Posted on: Wed, 01/16/2002 - 2:17am
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Dr. Graham is wonderful. I have been told she is the best! She has helped us out tremendously. She has even talked with the school principal about my son's allergies.
Our school is trying its best to be peanut
free, and the cafeteria will not serve any
thing with nuts or peanuts because of his extreme allergy. I am so thankful for her and the school.

Posted on: Thu, 08/17/2006 - 12:34pm
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Oh my! So sorry to here about your DH. Of course, make sure he carries a couple of Epipens at all times. (They are heat and cold sensitive, so read some of the other posts for creative ways to keep them stable.) And keep Benadryl on hand, as a second med.
You can ask his allergist for an allergy action plan. I will raise the post on Anaphylaxis Symptoms for all the newbies.
Start looking at the Restaurant section for safe places to eat. This is probably the hardest aspect of food allergy for adults.
Even with adults, it's a good idea to rid your home of the allergen so there are no accidents or cross-contamination risks. PB residue is well-known to survive dishwashing, and the residue can cause many "mystery reaction" from tabletops, shared keyboards, phones, etc...
And also, avoid eating peanuts yourself. Kissing can transmit the allergen to your DH. (My DH has an affair with omelets and seafood when he travels out of town.)
It's great that you are so supportive.
Daisy

Posted on: Thu, 08/17/2006 - 12:34pm
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Oh my! So sorry to here about your DH. Of course, make sure he carries a couple of Epipens at all times. (They are heat and cold sensitive, so read some of the other posts for creative ways to keep them stable.) And keep Benadryl on hand, as a second med.
You can ask his allergist for an allergy action plan. I will raise the post on Anaphylaxis Symptoms for all the newbies.
Start looking at the Restaurant section for safe places to eat. This is probably the hardest aspect of food allergy for adults.
Even with adults, it's a good idea to rid your home of the allergen so there are no accidents or cross-contamination risks. PB residue is well-known to survive dishwashing, and the residue can cause many "mystery reaction" from tabletops, shared keyboards, phones, etc...
And also, avoid eating peanuts yourself. Kissing can transmit the allergen to your DH. (My DH has an affair with omelets and seafood when he travels out of town.)
It's great that you are so supportive.
Daisy

Posted on: Wed, 04/13/2011 - 1:03pm
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z?

Posted on: Thu, 04/14/2011 - 2:42am
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What happened to my post? I tried to edit, and when I saved it, it was gone.....except for the "z?" What did I do wrong?

Posted on: Thu, 04/21/2011 - 10:51pm
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that's tough. There are resources on here for pproducts made in peanut free facilities. there expensive but safe.

Posted on: Tue, 05/10/2011 - 3:56am
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Keep being positive! I am 22 years old and have had this allergy my entire life, and while it's not always easy to deal with, it is managable! As hard as it is to grow up with the allergy, it must be extrememly difficult to develope it later in life once your habbits are already set. While my lifestyle has always be taylored to avoid peanuts, you are experiencing this for the first time and it may seem really overwhelming. Don't worry though, you'ce come to the right place! Be sure to always read the ingredients on everything, and try to cook at home as much as possible. Check you inbox for a little message I sent you!

Posted on: Tue, 06/25/2013 - 5:05am
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I have been a Mental Health Nurse or many years. None of the hospitals that I have worked at have done this. This may be different for the more longer term substance abuse treatment centers as they don't have the medical support that may be needed. We frequently refer patients to these for further treatment and not once has this been an issue.
When we get a patient with a peanut allergy we remove any potential allergens from the unit and put a sign on the door alerting others. The patient is restricted to the unit for meals as a safety measure so if there is a reaction an epipen and nurse is readily available.
You may want to check out other hospitals in the area. I am appalled that your son may be denied treatment because of the allergy.

Posted on: Sun, 09/08/2013 - 10:07pm
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Is the doctor you mentioned an allergist? I'm surprised they did not give you any information. First, coconut is not a treenut, nor is nutmeg. An allergist can do allergy testing to determine which treenuts your child may be allergic to. Many people have both peanut and treenut allergies but not all. The problem comes with cross-contamination. As my child has both treenut and peanut allergies I cannot say which, if any commercial products are safe. PLEASE do a lot of research - legitimate websites, books, and a knowledgeable allergist, along with a knowledgable pediatrician. FAAN and FARE are two organizations to start with. Most important is the doctor, however. On this site, we can only give our experiences, which may be different for your child and no one should give you "medical advice", except healthcare professionals.

Posted on: Tue, 11/26/2013 - 3:20am
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Some people, like my son have cross reactions to peas, and legume family things......id say go get a test run first to see what the reaction shows on it first before just completely cutting them out all together.

Posted on: Mon, 12/09/2013 - 5:50am
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Mysia, I am like you. I've never had a stronger reaction to peanuts than just throwing up everything. My favorite vegetable is green peas. I love split pea soup, but if I eat it more than once in awhile, my mouth "feels fuzzy." So I'm just careful. I say, do what you have to do to be safe.

Posted on: Thu, 12/12/2013 - 1:37pm
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Do NOT continue to eat peanuts. My allergy started as stomach pain and a few times I made the sacrifice for my favorite candy and it is now a full blown anaphylactic allergy. I personally have no problems with peas and beans, however.

Posted on: Tue, 03/31/2015 - 3:26am
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I developed my allergy at age 30 after eating peanuts and tree nuts my entire life up until that point. My allergist told me that allergies can change every 7 years or so. So if you do decide to retest I would wait at least the 7 years before doing so.

Posted on: Fri, 07/31/2015 - 5:45am
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I commend you for asking this question! Some of my family members don't take the time to really find out what it all means, which causes major problems, particularly around holidays. I'm not a doctor, but a mom who has kids with nut allergies. At 7.28, she was at risk for a severe reaction if around peanuts/peanut butter. The fact that her level has gone down speaks volumes to the care she is receiving from her mom and dad. She is still at risk (my allergist says 1.0 or over (I _think_ - please check with your daughter/daughter in law for what your gdaughter's guidelines are) is an allergy and any contact with peanuts, peanut butter, or items made in a facility with nuts are to be avoided according to the allergists I've take my children to.
The difficulty lies in the unpredictable nature of how a person will react when exposed to the allergen. Your granddaughter's gut finds the peanut protein toxic. It's nothing that could have been avoided- sometimes it just happens. The reaction to ingestion of the protein could result in hives, vomiting, sometimes an asthma attack...the list of possible symptoms are something you should become familiar with. To stop anaphylactic shock, an epipen would be administered and 911 would be called. One exposure could just result in hives, but another could result in a multi-system shut down where she can't breathe and/or loses consciousness.
The only effective way my allergist can treat my children's allergies is strict avoidance. No one in my house eats peanuts or peanut butter. If we want to eat it, we must do so away from home, wash our hands thoroughly and brush our teeth before coming back home. I encourage you to please talk to the parents- they know the specific information for the child you are inquiring about. I WISH my mother in law would do so- she doesn't believe us, rolls her eyes, etc. my father in law thinks one little bite won't hurt.
What you can do for your grand daughter is 1)learn to read food labels 2)develop a close relationship with her parents regarding what her specific challenges are with managing her allergies 3) learn when and how to use an epi-pen in case of shock and 4) realize that it's extremely scary for some parents to let their food allergy kid out of their sight, especially before she can manage her own food.
You are awesome! I wish my family would be as willing to learn!!

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