\"Patients with Severe Peanut Allergy Symptoms React to Lower Doses\"

Posted on: Fri, 12/20/2002 - 10:02am
river's picture
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Posted on: Sun, 12/29/2002 - 2:30am
Gail W's picture
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Can anyone help me understand this article?
The first sentence states, "Patients with severe reactions to peanut allergy react to lower doses of peanut that patients with mild symptoms..." And the last sentence says, "Patients who demonstrated severe reactions had lower threshold doses." Does this mean there is merit to statements that someone can be "mildly allergic" or "severely allergic" to peanuts? I think many of us believe that intuitively, but does this provide the data to support it?
Gail

Posted on: Sun, 12/29/2002 - 3:23am
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That's how I took the article. Although allergies are such an inexact science. I don't think you can definitively say what the next reaction will be like, as people can become more, or less sensitive.
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Cynde Punch

Posted on: Wed, 01/01/2003 - 7:30am
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Thanks river,
I am going to copy this for Little v school meeting
Love this site
Synthia
My understanding is,if your reaction is sever then it will take a smaller amount to react.
If you have a mild reaction then it will take larger amount to react
[This message has been edited by synthia (edited January 01, 2003).]

Posted on: Sat, 03/01/2003 - 4:31am
Gail W's picture
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Bumping up for MamaBear's thoughts

Posted on: Sat, 03/29/2003 - 10:38am
synthia's picture
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re-raising for new members
Love this site
Synthia

Posted on: Tue, 04/01/2003 - 3:56am
Corvallis Mom's picture
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Just read the original research article. It was a pretty small sample but probably represents a good cross-section of PA people. (No children included, but people with high RAST levels were included).
HALF of the 26 people tested reacted to less than 0.003 g of peanut. (3 milligrams) As a comparison, 200 mg of table salt is about as much as a grain of white rice. The most sensitive patient reacted to the lowest dose given- 100 micrograms. (0.000100 g) The most sensitive subjects (those who reacted to the smallest amounts) also had the most severe reactions. The study doesn't really try to establish what the lowest threshold dose really is for the most sensitive end of the spectrum.
(As an aside, in one not particularly good European study from a couple of years ago- the statistics were not great is why I say that- the low threshold dose was less than 30 micrograms.)
What this means is that MOST people who test RAST 2 or higher for PA will react to cross-contaminated items- probably to traces too small to be seen visibly.

Posted on: Tue, 04/01/2003 - 8:44am
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Quote:Originally posted by Gail W:
[b]Bumping up for MamaBear's thoughts[/b]
Transplanting my answer (and your question) from another thread (a while back) [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] :
quote:
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Originally posted by Gail W:
erik, in addition to luck and good navigational skills, do you think that maybe another factor -- your particular "sensitivity" to peanut-- was involved in your not having reactions at school? Link:
[url="http://www.docguide.com/news/content.nsf/news/8525697700573E1885256C87002171E6"]http://www.docguide.com/news/content.nsf/news/8525697700573E1885256C87002171E6[/url]
I realize that there has been much discussion on whether or not one can be "a little allergic" and I 'd like some help from you all on how you think this study would impact your thinking re standardized protocals.
Gail
[This message has been edited by Gail W (edited March 05, 2003).]
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Gail, I cannot retrieve the entire article in the link, just the synopsis.
An excerpt from the link:
"Patients with severe reactions to peanut allergy react to lower doses of peanut than patients with mild symptoms, Dutch and United States researchers report.
A substantial proportion of those who are allergic to peanut react to very low amounts, they point out. This makes the accurate declaration of peanut content in consumer products important."
But from what I read, three points stand out for me:
#1: although it was stated that the specific research indicated:
"Patients with severe reactions to peanut allergy react to lower doses of peanut than patients with mild symptoms"
I don't think we can necessarily rule out the possibility that those with mild symptoms won't DEVELOP SEVERE REACTIONS IN THE FUTURE. That is the unknown variable, no?
#2 Does it necessarily indicate that a higher dose of peanut protein won't result in a mild reaction?
#3 It might support the idea that standards should err to protect an individual from the worst case senario: death; from a minute exposure. This since there exists a relationship, although not exclusive, between small exposure and the very real possibility, as demonstrated by this research, of severe reaction.
MommaBear

Posted on: Wed, 05/14/2003 - 5:55am
synthia's picture
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re-raising
Love this site
Synthia

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