Paris, student trip - PA

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My 15 yr old PA daughter has an opportunity to travel with a school group to Paris, Provence area & Barcelona. We have been to Italy & Chamonix as a family. Italy was virtually peabut free & we were surprised to find that almost every restaurant in Chamonix used peanut oil! We're wondering: 1. if this is just as prevalent in the rest of France and 2. whether we should be concerned ias long as she does not have anyfood cooked in the peanut oil (I've heard that it is likely that peanut oil is processed at a high enough temperature that it is not actually a risk- though of course I would not have her eat any anyway). She speaks French fluently and is very responsible. All opinions appreciated.

On Jun 7, 2007

Hi Elldale, I have adult-onset PA. I spent three weeks in France this past summer...a week in Paris and two weeks in Burgundy.

I carried a chef card written in French when eating in restaurants. I would not eat anything cooked in peanut oil because you don't know if it is refined (supposedly free of peanut protein) or unrefined.

I had an apt. in Paris and a gite in Burgundy. Both had kitchens so that I could cook. In restaurants, I ate just salads but provided my own salad dressing. ([url]http://www.allergygrocer.com[/url] has a variety of single-servings of Annie's Natural Salad Dressing.)

My French is limited to, 'I would like a glass of red wine please' and 'where are the toilets please?' so I didn't dare risk having a reaction. Perhaps your daughter will be more relaxed if she is fluent in the language.

40% of those with PA also cross-react to lupine. Lupine is not common in the U.S. but it is in Europe, where French flour may contain up to 10% lupine flour without disclosure. There are labs in the U.S. (Quest is one) that will do a lupine RAST.

Edited to add: A few days ago I read online that there are lots of 'nutty breads' in Spain. I don't know how true this is.

[This message has been edited by Adele (edited June 07, 2007).]

On Jun 11, 2007

Tx for the info. With the lupine flour issue, does it mean you would avoid all bread in France?? Did you find it difficult to find restaurants that did not use peanut oil? Would you eat food not cooked in peanut oil in a restaurant that used it for some foods? What were your concerns about salad dressing? I thought they pretty much used only olive oil & vinegar. Do you eat any plane food? Or any food at all on the plane? Last year we had connections so I was trying to have my daughter eat between flights on the way back (on the way there we brought our own food but did eat a fruit plate from the airline. Tx again for all your help.

Quote:

Originally posted by Adele: [b]Hi Elldale, I have adult-onset PA. I spent three weeks in France this past summer...a week in Paris and two weeks in Burgundy.

I carried a chef card written in French when eating in restaurants. I would not eat anything cooked in peanut oil because you don't know if it is refined (supposedly free of peanut protein) or unrefined.

I had an apt. in Paris and a gite in Burgundy. Both had kitchens so that I could cook. In restaurants, I ate just salads but provided my own salad dressing. ([url]http://www.allergygrocer.com[/url] has a variety of single-servings of Annie's Natural Salad Dressing.)

My French is limited to, 'I would like a glass of red wine please' and 'where are the toilets please?' so I didn't dare risk having a reaction. Perhaps your daughter will be more relaxed if she is fluent in the language.

40% of those with PA also cross-react to lupine. Lupine is not common in the U.S. but it is in Europe, where French flour may contain up to 10% lupine flour without disclosure. There are labs in the U.S. (Quest is one) that will do a lupine RAST.

Edited to add: A few days ago I read online that there are lots of 'nutty breads' in Spain. I don't know how true this is.

[This message has been edited by Adele (edited June 07, 2007).][/b]

On Jun 11, 2007

double post

[This message has been edited by Adele (edited June 11, 2007).]

On Jun 11, 2007

Quote:

Originally posted by Adele: [b]Hello Elldale,

[b]With the lupine flour issue, does it mean you would avoid all bread in France?? [/b]

Yes, I didn't eat any bread in France. If you google lupine (with or without the 'e' on the end) + "peanut allergy' you'll find that about 40% of those with PA will have a reaction to lupine. If your daughter has a RAST test for lupine and it is negative, you STILL have the issue of eating bread with unknown ingredients.

[b]Did you find it difficult to find restaurants that did not use peanut oil? Would you eat food not cooked in peanut oil in a restaurant that used it for some foods?[/b]

I avoid peanut oil because I don't know if it is refined or unrefined. If I ate in a restaurant that used peanut oil, but not for my food, I would make sure the restaurant understands the allergy and cross-contamination. There are some interesting stats on peanut oil. I think I read that 5% of those with PA react to REFINED peanut oil.

[b]What were your concerns about salad dressing? I thought they pretty much used only olive oil & vinegar[/b]

Unknown ingredients. I was traveling with a friend with celiac. She always ordered salad with oil/vinegar and often got the wrong dressing. When I put my own dressing on, I know exactly what is in it.

[b] Do you eat any plane food? Or any food at all on the plane? Last year we had connections so I was trying to have my daughter eat between flights on the way back (on the way there we brought our own food but did eat a fruit plate from the airline. [/b]

I took my own food for the flight, but my celiac friend ordered a gluten free meal. I wished I had orderd the same thing as there were items in the meal that I can have eaten, such as a labeled Yoplait yogurt, banana, etc. I've booked an overseas flight for November. This time, I've ordered a fruit plate.

We all have different comfort levels. I'm super careful because I can't afford to have a reaction in another country where I have a huge language barrier. Like here in the U.S. the small, more expensive restaurants better able to deal with peanut allergy.

My last night in Paris, we ate at a nice restaurant instead of the usual cafe. The waiter went out of his way to provide a safe meal. He told me that his niece had severe PA and he understood the allergy.

I ate very carefully. Even in Paris I could find small grocery stores. I ate a lot of apples, cheese, yogurt. In cafes I usually just ordered salad. There is usually a big variety of salads on the menus.

I hope this helps!

[/b]

On Jun 11, 2007

Elldale, this is the chef card I carried on my trip. I printed a couple on brightly colored paper and had them laminated. I'm not sure how accurate the French is, but it worked!

[b]AVERTISSEMENT:

Je suis allergique

On Jun 11, 2007

Adele really has the experience here and I will add NO plane food. You can't take that kind of chance so far away from any help.

My son (22) traveled to Scotland two years ago for a semester. He carried his own food on the plane thus eliminating any chance of ingestion reaction which would have been the worst.

Peg

On Jun 11, 2007

Elldale, I've raised a thread for you that I posted right after I got back from France.

Kit Kat bars in France are safe! (but read the label first)

On Jun 11, 2007

I travel to Europe often and have never had a problem. I am a vegetarian and often would eat a sandwich or cheese and baguette at a brassiere for lunch. For dinner I would have Italian food or go to a vegetarian restaurant. Of course, in France I was with someone who spoke some french and in Germany, Switzerland, and Austria I spoke some German which helped. I have always eaten plain bread (such as a baguette) without a problem throughout Europe. I have never used a chef card though I am contemplating doing so next time I am in Europe. Have a great trip!

On Jun 14, 2007

I would go with the plain bread , the french have pretty high standards when it comes to their daily loaf. No preservatives at all. After all thats what people carry under their arms all day ! i would go early to a bakers , and get my french stick out of the same oven they use for bread every day. ( we have used our translations cards frequently, it doenst matter how good your french is, it has more impact in black and white. ) sarah

Any other bread type of thing we would buy from the supermarket with a english label. Its hard work, these days.

On Jun 14, 2007

BTW I have looked in to the process of refined peanut oil, and am happy with it. I have let my son have this quite frequently. I also know of some other highly allergic adult ( and I do mean High, as in cant have skin prick tests AT ALL) and this oil has never caused problems.

Its worth looking in to before making your mind to avoid it.

sarah

On Jun 18, 2007

have to add that the less than 25 % rule no longer applies, legally everything that has a food label has to state 12 different allergens. This covers the whole of europe. This does make things easier.

sarah

On Jun 18, 2007

Quote:

Originally posted by williamsmummy: [b]have to add that the less than 25 % rule no longer applies, legally everything that has a food label has to state 12 different allergens. This covers the whole of europe. This does make things easier.

sarah[/b]

thanks for the info! What are the 12 allergens they label for?

Adrienne

On Jun 18, 2007

made law nov 05, plans to add two other next year, are actions to push for lupine after that. but current ones

peanut/egg/milk/shellfish/fish/cellery/ mustard/treenuts/sulphur dioxide, (hmmm........its late here and brain going blank, needless to say its a wide list that covers the other european causes of allergens, hence the mustard and cellery for the french, who have a higher rateing of those allergies!!

Its listed on the web site 'food standards agency '

hope this helps , but brain going blank at 11 a night!! sarah

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