Paradoxical behavior.

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Original:

[b]"Dem Bones"[/b]

Does anyone know anything about these? The specific individual packages *I* found didn't have a "may contain" warning on them. They are made by [b]Brachs.[/b] I've personally found a great deal of their candy to have warnings on them wrt peanuts and treenuts. Not sure of their manufacturing practices. Don't know if their labelling is cautious with regard to may contains, processed ons, or shared equipment.

My youngest's teacher is doing a academic activity involving these and says her lesson plan is [b]set[/b]. She will not be changing it. She has given me the option of taking him home, allowing him to remain and sit alone at a different table with another activity or participate with the provided materials. (With my permission of course.)

This is K-5.

BTW, I got a phone call this morning asking me if he could carve pumpkins (seeds). I was told if he couldn't, I could take him home. Probably was called because I've told them before, that if an unsafe item would be used [i]no matter what[/i], I would be forced to remove him from the classroom. Can't speak for anyone else, but in our situation, the pumpkins aren't a threat. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] Generally, they have been accomodating. Just not sure how I feel about this. I was also told in the context of this discussion [i]"kindergarten is not mandatory"[/i].

No, I do not have a 504----no written plan. Long story. My oldest (4th grade) has his food allergies covered by OHI under his IEP. They attend the same school. I just can't figure out why if they can accomodate in a particular way for one child, why can't they for another, particularly in the same family? Without forcing me to have a written plan.

General Disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form. Just describing my own personal, highly individual and unique situation. IMMV.

edit to name specific product. Although wondering if I even had to? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

[This message has been edited by MommaBear (edited October 28, 2005).]

On Oct 28, 2005

AArrrgghhh! Why do "academic" activities have to involve candy/food? Don't get me started on this!!!!!!

Cathy

On Oct 28, 2005

I find that this teacher is incredibly obnoxious. I also wonder why food has to be used in the classroom for teaching. Just today, in my DS's class, the teacher had a cooking project for the students -- which I learned about when I went to pick DS up for lunch. She did say that she thought everything was okay - no nuts (they were making pumpkin muffins so it was fine) - but - hello - why food at all. Did your son's teacher tell you in advance, as a "head's up" kind of thing -- so you could check the stuff out? It seems weak that, especially with candy, she "set" her project before getting your approval. It seems completely wrong to that she would do a project that might possibly have your son sitting off to the side, unable to participate. On the whole, the whole thing strikes me as wrong, based on the fact that it might cause a student to be excluded -- which should be unacceptable whether a child has a written plan or not (of any type). But that is just my opinion --

On Oct 28, 2005

[quote]Originally posted by MommaBear: [b][b]"Dem Bones"[/b]

Does anyone know anything about these? The specific individual packages *I* found didn't have a "may contain" warning on them. They are made by [b]Brachs.[/b] I've personally found a great deal of their candy to have warnings on them wrt peanuts and treenuts. Not sure of their manufacturing practices. Don't know if their labelling is cautious with regard to may contains, processed ons, or shared equipment.[B]

[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum4/HTML/000241.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum4/HTML/000241.html[/url]

As far as nothing "in writing" I completely understand yet believe that sometimes having something spelled out will not help some people understand. They just don't get it. Of course they could. As you know, we will always have to be diligent with them. Last week our early childhood "educator" looked me in the eye and said she just didn't think that the written words "must avoid all nuts" would include a nut sorting project. The weekly theme was squirrels, how could we not sort nuts? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

~Jodi

On Oct 29, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by 2BusyBoys: [b] The weekly theme was squirrels,

[/b]

lol. appropriate theme, huh? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]

thank you for the link. I found it helpful. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

On Oct 29, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by gvmom: [b] Did your son's teacher tell you in advance, as a "head's up" kind of thing -- so you could check the stuff out? It seems weak that, especially with candy, she "set" her project before getting your approval. [/b]

oh, this whole situation, impho, was avoidable, I've been sorta crutching it along. Knowing I was going to end up where I am. But not knowing how to avoid it. The teacher is experienced, and is near retirement. The teacher is probably about as concientious about his allergy as I've seen, but some of the solutions strike me as "really, that's the solution?"

I mean, we're where we're at despite long phone calls. You know the feeling ya get when you talk your head off, start to feel like a boorish nag, and think: "But you haven't been where I'm at, there's reasons for my seemingly odd requests."? Don't get me wrong, the phone calls were productive, but not adequate.

For example: In the written plan, I ask for 48 hours notice. It gives *me* ample time to check things out and without a panic. Without feeling like I have to make sudden limiting decisions. Be *overprotective*.

I received a note home in his bag asking if this could be used in class along with some other items I was unsure of. Couldn't find the others in the store, only *felt* I had that night. There was no "will use on" date on the note, had to assume it was the next day, and make a decision. I was unsure of the whole Brach's brand. Couldn't ask the teacher, no home number, school closed. Sent a note next day with my concerns.

Now, knowing the conversations we've had, and something *else* I was unsure of (from what youngest said, it was hard to tell if some birthday treats used in the classroom the day he came home with the note--- that he wasn't allowed to have---were used. I thought "Gee, I didn't get a phone call asking if they were "ok", but still they didn't give him one, why? Are they just using unsafe stuff with him present?"

I've always said if they were going to *insist* on using something unsafe, I'd remove him from the classroom, hoping that it wouldn't come to that. They want prepackaged treats for the class, and my understanding was "unsafe" prepackaged treats would go home and he would be given an alternate. (I mean, I don't have a written plan). Maybe I understood wrong.

Now, for the first time, in that class, I was dealing with a potentially unsafe item for a lesson plan and no time frame. I sent what I thought was a light note and my assumptions about using (actually not using) that treat with the caveat that *if* something would be used *regardless* of it being unsafe (I mean, didn't have enough time to check it out, had to assume it was unsafe, had to assume it was being used the next day with no time frame listed), then I would have no other option than to remove him from the classroom that day.

[i]I'd rather remove my child for the day, than have him segregated for the moment. [/i] Given the circumstances of the particular situation. I mean, we're not talking day to day [i]inevitable[/i] stuff that goes on in life.

We're talking a planned educational activity. Plus the need for safety. It's a combination I can't ignore.

Won't pull him out of school entirely for that, [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img], but I will take some initiative.

That's *my right*. It's how *I* deal with it. I'll be the one to *make up* the difference. I'll spoil him rotten. It's my *real* world, yes? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]

If only I would have been given a time frame, I think some of the ruffled feathers could have been avoided. I mean, turns out, the activity is on Monday. I still can't reach her to discuss my findings *after the fact*. It's why I have a measureable time frame written into my other child's plan. I couldn't even locate the other item to check it.

Why? Because it's description didn't exist. I was given a product name, but told it was manufactured by another company in the note. I trust the labelling of the company that was listed. Although I don't use the items made out of country by that company *regardless* of labelling. The product description was right, but the company was wrong. I'm not sure of the company the product *actually* was made by. In order to read a label accurately I have to ascertain the *correct* company as well. KWIM? It was a good example of why I'm squeemish about giving others [i]carte blanche[/i] responsibility for label reading.

It's part of the reason I've been pest over the phone in this situation (when school hours are in). Why I've seemed *overprotective*. Boorish, even.

Acutally? Second time this week a label reading thing has come up. I'm allowed to help plan the halloween party for my youngest, but have found will not be allowed to attend. Kindergarten and preschool at this particular institution is more restrictive about these things, I've found. I don't have a written plan allowing me to attend, either. I'll be available, I've made arrangements, but have won't be allowed to attend.

Back to the second label reading thing. I called the main halloween party person, who by the way, was very accommodating. This person was providing the party snack. This person said the snack was safe. I asked what it was, but they didn't have the box in front of them. They described the product. I thought it sounded familiar. They found the box. I was right. It was familiar. Something I've excluded in the past for "may contains/shared equipment" warnings. They read the label to me (over the phone). No warning found. I asked them to look again. Still no warning found. A third time...........[i]warning found[/i].

Would someone else have caught this? Who knows? This person was very accommodating, and assigned "party snack" to me. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] It's the only food that will be served. I've been assured of this. (??)

Turns out the *other* item the teacher wanted me to check for her (to put in treat bags) was *safe*. (Took some time to find this out) Prior to this discovery, we concluded she would just substitute a toy item for it. It's a cool piece of candy. Modelled after real food and in several pieces. Do I want to rehash this? I don't know....... Too bad.

Hey, have I mentioned similiar concers in my oldest son's class? The one with *The Written Plan* No. None. Can't say for sure it's because of the written plan, *but* I do know that plan is the result of many, many, many situations and experiences similiar to this. I mean, we had [b]rationale[/b] for virtually every point of that plan.

General Disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form. Just describing my own personal highly individual and unique situation . IMMV.

On Oct 29, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by Momcat: [b]AArrrgghhh! Why do "academic" activities have to involve candy/food?

[/b]

good point.

On Oct 29, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by MommaBear: [b]Back to the second label reading thing. I called the main halloween party person, who by the way, was very accommodating. This person was providing the party snack. This person said the snack was safe. I asked what it was, but they didn't have the box in front of them. They described the product. I thought it sounded familiar. They found the box. I was right. It was familiar. Something I've excluded in the past for "may contains/shared equipment" warnings. They read the label to me (over the phone). No warning found. I asked them to look again. Still no warning found. A third time...........[i]warning found[/i].[/b]

Scary isn't it! One of those weeks this week. The squirrels than my sister. She's was in town for a visit and a little shopping. In her pregnant state she decides she needs a snack. Claims she is avoiding peanuts, treenuts, etc. I mention that the snack she picked up is a may contain. Argues with me about it so I let it go. She proceeds to eat it in the car. Reads the box. Bold warning. Asks what she should do if DS asks for a bite. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/eek.gif[/img] My first instinct had been to tell her she couldn't eat it in the car. No may contains for us. But I let it go. Now I'm patting myself on the back for being so *overprotective* when she asks for time with DS. A lesson for me and for her. A safe "I told you so". Sometimes I need that. Part of being a big sister I guess [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] Back to topic. Glad I could help find the link for you [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

On Oct 29, 2005

Remind me (and others)~ both cubs are in the same building, right? Same building principal?

Quote:

Originally posted by MommaBear: [b]I'm allowed to help plan the halloween party for my youngest, but have found will not be allowed to attend. Kindergarten and preschool at this particular institution is more restrictive about these things, I've found. I don't have a written plan allowing me to attend, either. I'll be available, I've made arrangements, but have won't be allowed to attend.[/b]

Really? LOL! That's funny... Can you believe that this school district still says such ridiculous things like this to you? Not allowing a parent to attend a school event. LOL. It'd be funny if it weren't so abhorrent. Do all the other parents who [i]are[/i] attending each have a written accommodation plan that [i]allows[/i] them to attend the party? <>

I'm just curious... was it the [i]teacher[/i] who stated to you that you are not "allowed" to attend? I can't imagine that the principal would have the b@11$ to say something like that to you.... But I wouldn't be surprised if a seasoned teacher would state this. They know the "system" and how to control their classrooms and parents.

Is this Deja vu all over again? It's disappointing, I'm sure. Why not just have your cub allergy tested (resolve the "incomplete diagnosis") and then the start the formal process with the school?

On Oct 29, 2005

If your child attends a public school, threaten to keep him home on the days they want to pick him up early. They lose their ADA money that way, and may be a bit more hesitant to plan things that he can't participate in if they're going to be losing funding over it.

This has worked pretty well for us in the past.

On Oct 29, 2005

Mommabear - Well, they would edit out what I would like to put here -- so at the very least -- when they told you that you couldn't attend the Halloween party did you laugh at them? Are they going to call the police on you? Are you "allowed" to show up at school any other time? I could go to my son's school, on any day, at any time, stay for however long I wanted -- I have never heard of such a thing. I should add, that yes, DS attends a public school. I am shaking my head - shocked that they would have the nerve.

Gail, is that legal?

On Oct 29, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by gvmom: [BGail, is that legal? [/B]

Is there a school board policy about it? One that is uniformly applied? There could be....

And if there isn't a SB policy and the teacher [i] said [/i] that MommaBear is "not allowed"? I don't know if this is legal or not... [i]saying [/i]something, that is. Even if it's false, or a known lie, or intended to be intimidation, I don't know if that is or isn't [i]legal[/i]. It could be. But the teacher could just say that there was a "misunderstanding". That "if MommaBear had only been clearer that she wanted to attend" she certainly would have made arrangements for her, that MommaBear seemed okay with the arrangements, blah-blah-blah... You know, the basic CYA defense....

BTW, my former SIL is a school teacher. She told me once that she called a mother a "F'ing B" (just loud enough that the mom heard) when the mom was leaving her classroom. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/eek.gif[/img] Can you believe that? I still can't get over this. When the mother reported this to the principal, my SIL just denied it. She said that, "the principal likes me and knows I would never do that". That if it came down to believing the parent or her, the principal would back her. Unbelievable. I was (and still am) stunned.

Now, I'm not suggesting that this is common behavior by a teacher. I sat in shock with my jaw dropped as my ex-SIL told me this. It scared me... that this can happen. That she did it [i]and [/i] that she was okay with it enough to share the experience with me as if it was acceptable behavior. That it was no big deal. That is was laughable.

But [i] prohibiting [/i] MommaBear from entering the classroom where her child is present? Physically blocking her entrance into the room when MommaBear tried to attend the party... That's an entirely different scenario. That doesn't sound [i]legal[/i] to me.

But it's just ridiculous that a teacher would make such a statement to MommaBear. It may or may not be illegal, but we all as parents, know that "not allowing" a parent to attend a classroom event is obviously [i] suspect.[/i] A red flag.

IMO it's a power-play. The teacher is telling MommaBear that she has the power to limit MommaBear's access to and control of her classroom. As MommaBear already stated, she's "forcing" MommaBear to get the legal authority. (i.e. a written accommodation plan)

On Oct 29, 2005

Gail, I will *definitely* address some of your concerns later tonight. It's very intricate and as usual, something else is hanging in the balance. BTW, there are two principals in this school. One for kindergarten, one for grades 1-4. And no, one is not even allowed to walk the halls unless with permission, scheduled, and within a certain time frame. Personally? I *do* see value in this. It is rigorously enforced. It's a newer school with security access devices and remote controls to buzz people in. I live in a *nice* area.

And yes, the principal is well aware of the party limitations. After all, the regulations are made by her. IE: specific number of volunteers/party personel on any given day, scheduled in advance, strictly enforced. Sign in/Sign out. Intercom to announce times to leave. [i]Strictly enforced[/i]. She informed me she was waiting as the office personnel called to ask me if my cub would be participating in the pumpkin carving or [i]going home[/i]. *She* told me: "Kindergarten is not mandatory". Sure, I know this, but I told her it is my understanding I could still request a 504. At least that is my understanding, I could be wrong. Afterall, my child was in early childhood for two years and in at risk for one and with an educational diagnosis of PDD NOS and severe/profound speech delay. Maybe kindergarten is [i]less mandatory[/i] for him than others. I'm still awaiting futher *re-evaluation*. My guess is that he'd fall into "gifted" in many ways, but maybe not in some others. KWIM?

That said, she has also helped implemented a great deal of accommodations for my child *without* a 504. Many. Although I'm not sure of all of them, many I feel she has been instrumental in providing. And it is my understanding you understand where I sit with *that*. The incomplete diagnosis, I mean.

Sure, it's her *duty*, but I'm finding more often than not, just expecting that to happen is rare. Maybe I sound beat, but I'm not, I just know a rock and a hard place when I see it. Not sure I should look a gift horse in the mouth. KWIM?

I was told by the teacher my letter sounded threatening. [i]Threatening????[/i] No way. It was just to the point and factual to my understanding. I told her: "[i]I chart this way.[/i] Neutral.

I merely asked some questions, seeking clarification and stated my assumption was she would not be using anything that was unsafe or not verified as safe.

Maybe *that* was what was percieved as [i]threatening[/i]. It wasn't meant to be. It was just meant to state my assumptions. So at least if they were *wrong*, I'd be informed.

Again, KWIM?

ps....Yesterday, without my prior knowledge, the vice super-intendant (aka: [i]former principal to my oldest, you know, the one who told me [b]"You should homeschool your child"[/b][/i], (talk about recyling), met with some kindergarten personnel to make some determinations about what would be *some* of the policy in certain situations about handling my youngest's food allergy. Without me. But just my handwritten note asking questions of the teacher that morning and stating if persons insisted on using unsafe products would be used for classroom activities, I would have no other choice than to pick my child up. Talk about getting backdoored. Ouch. My orifice hurts. Oh well, then maybe I can assume since this person is now *vice super-intendant*, they are no longer *special education director* in that district. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img] (Yes, another recycle after leaving the principal detail) I mean, how long do these people hold their positions anyway?????? Must they keep shuffling around? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img] Hmmmmmmmm. So maybe now would be a good time to get my youngest re-evaluated by the school. OR MAYBE NOT.

pps....that was a big "ps", interesting, is it not?

I'm rambling now, but I'll add more, feel free to comment on the above. It would help.

[This message has been edited by MommaBear (edited October 29, 2005).]

On Oct 29, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by solarflare: [b]If your child attends a public school, threaten to keep him home on the days they want to pick him up early. They lose their ADA money that way, and may be a bit more hesitant to plan things that he can't participate in if they're going to be losing funding over it.

[/b]

He doesn't have an "ADA" designation. Not sure what money they would lose. I remember daily *general* attendance has significance, just can't remember what.

On Oct 29, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by Gail W: [b] Is there a school board policy about it? One that is uniformly applied? There could be....

And if there isn't a SB policy and the teacher [i] said [/i] that MommaBear is "not allowed"? I don't know if this is legal or not... [i]saying [/i]something, that is. Even if it's false, or a known lie, or intended to be intimidation, I don't know if that is or isn't [i]legal[/i]. It could be. But the teacher could just say that there was a "misunderstanding". That "if MommaBear had only been clearer that she wanted to attend" she certainly would have made arrangements for her, that MommaBear seemed okay with the arrangements, blah-blah-blah... You know, the basic CYA defense....

[/b]

completely understand. I've mulled this over. I just kind of assumed that I would be attending (especially since I volunteered on the volunteer sign up list for *all three parties*. I mean, isn't it just sort of the [i]cosmic master plan[/i] that parents of kindergarten children get to attend class parties if they want to? Kindergarten could be so cooooooooooool. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] Kindergarten *should* be cool. For children, for their parents. I'd love to teach kindergarten. Except I'd probably be sick all the time. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img]

My husband also volunteered in case my older cub's party was at the same time. Attendance by either my husband or myself at my older cub's party is mandatory. It's written into his plan and was a strong request by the IEP team. (I wouldn't have dreamt of saying "no". Turns out I am only one of the persons chosen to donate goods this time. I will be [i]allowed[/i] to attend the last party of the school year (as a classroom helper, not a party planner.....

Each party has party donaters, classroom helpers, party coordinator.

Honestly? I figured a teacher would *want* the parent of the food allergic child at at least the *first* party. KWIM? I mean, even the party coodinator ended up asking me if I wanted to attend, and asking the teacher the same thing.

[i]I hope nobody is attempting to prove they are *expert* at something, that after ten years of dealing with on a day to day basis I still feel I learn something new about routinely.[/i]

On Oct 29, 2005

[b]Honestly? I figured a teacher would *want* the parent of the food allergic child at at least the *first* party. KWIM? I mean, even the party coodinator ended up asking me if I wanted to attend, and asking the teacher the same thing. [/b]

I would have figured that too. It seems a bit odd, to say the least. I don't see, FA's aside, why a teacher would turn down an extra adult that could help out during a party -- then add FA's on.....well, something seems "off" about that to me.

About my legal question - I would guess that a teacher probably wouldn't be prosecuted for lying about a parent not being allowed to attend a class party. My question about legality was more directed to Mommabears rights as a parent to be able to go to the school, observe her child & their activities.

On Oct 29, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by MommaBear: [b] He doesn't have an "ADA" designation. Not sure what money they would lose. I remember daily *general* attendance has significance, just can't remember what.

[/b]

In this case, ADA means average daily attendance. Average daily attendance is the deciding factor in how much money the school district receives per day from the government. For example, public schools in California receive something like $96/student who attends school each day. Most schools are so desperate for that funding that the strongly discourage keeping your kids home from school unless they're sick, you're attending a religious service/holiday, or attending a funeral. Most school districts in my area get pissy if your kid misses more than 10 days of school due to illness.

I've had to keep Jason home from school twice under similar circumstances. Once was for a peanut carnival his kindergarden year (they played games using roasted peanuts as tickets and prizes), and the other was for a field trip to Whole Foods Market last year. The teachers just wanted to send him to another classroom during the events, but I didn't want him to feel like he was being punished, plus the whole "allergens on the other students hands" after the event.

On Oct 30, 2005

Quote:

Originally posted by solarflare: [b] In this case, ADA means average daily attendance. Average daily attendance is the deciding factor in how much money the school district receives per day from the government. For example, public schools in California receive something like $96/student who attends school each day. Most schools are so desperate for that funding that the strongly discourage keeping your kids home from school unless they're sick, you're attending a religious service/holiday, or attending a funeral. Most school districts in my area get pissy if your kid misses more than 10 days of school due to illness.

[/b]

ohhhhhhhhhhhhh. Hm. They want to [i]send him home[/i]. Wouldn't that allow them to count him as "present"? I mean, if he get's sent home partway through the day?

Bigger "hmmmmmm": I have to ask myself how much money the district invested in lawyers to *debate* with us previously. KWIM? Don't know how important funding is to them. I homeschooled for two years. Did they lose funding? I mean, [i]Not *once* in two years did they contact me[/i]. I pulled my child embroiled in a conflict in which a principal told me: "You should homeschool your child". (In the context of food allergies). And I never heard a word. No truant officer, no phone call, no documentation....[i]Nada[/i].

Got to admit, [i]it was a welcome surprise[/i]. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img] But still a surprise.

Whenever talk of school funding (or limitations of) come up, they've always brushed it aside, countering with "Money isn't a problem". Or other statements to that effect. I mean, when asking for *a lot* of things in my cubs IEP, not all food allergy related, I try to be considerate and ask for only what is needed, as well as do what I'm able to on my end. KWIM?

I try not to abuse privileges. Even when they are my rights. That whole, "Of those to whom much is given, much is required" thing. (John F. Kennedy)

"[i]For unto whomsoever much is given, of him shall be much required: and to whom men have committed much, of him they will ask the more. [/i]"

~Luke 12:48

I mean, in many ways, I feel blessed. For instance, I could pack my children up again, and walk home. And Lord knows, they are beautiful children. Honestly? I think the school knows this too. But I don't see how packing my children up is [i]requiring[/i] anything of me.

Don't get me wrong, I believe my children are benefitting immensely from their school experience. Even on the not so terrific days. Probably in some ways most people couldn't possibly understand. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

General Disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form. Just describing my own personal, highly individual, and unique situation. IMMV.

On Oct 30, 2005

Quote--------------------------------------- ohhhhhhhhhhhhh. Hm. They want to send him home. Wouldn't that allow them to count him as "present"? I mean, if he get's sent home partway through the day?

[b]YES![/b] Mommabear got to this part and had to post.

------------------ Love this site Synthia

On Oct 30, 2005

Yes, by sending him home partway through the day, they're still allowed to count him as present.

The principal at Jason's school gets VERY pissy when I keep him home under such circumstances. I think it was the most powerful statement that I could make that I wasn't going to put up with activities that would exclude my child for no fault of his own... well, that and calling a few members of the PTO on their assertion that it's okay to have food related activities that exclude my child just because other students will choose not to participate.

The priorities at this school are pretty screwed up, beyond the individual classroom level.

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