PA through Teen Years

Posted on: Thu, 04/06/2006 - 4:54pm
lavender765's picture
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Joined: 04/07/2006 - 09:00

Hello! I am a new member here, in my teens. I've just come to learn about others dealing with PA and to share my story.

My parents have known about my severe PA all throughout my life. When I was in preschool, they'd teach me what I was and wasn't allergic to in songs, rhymes, just like numbers and shapes. I'm also very allergic to tree nuts--well, all nuts basically, grass/trees/pollen, and mildly to fruits such as cantelope and watermelon.

I've carried an epipen with me all my life. It is always with me. Sometimes, I admit, I do take chances with the "MAY CONTAIN/PROCESSED ON EQUIPMENT...". When I meet new friends, I always have to tell them about the allergy, show them how to use the EpiPen, ect. ect... A little bit of a turn-off to most potential boyfriends [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img].. Finding out they can't eat most of the foods that I can't.

I've run into very interesting situations. Such as my boyfriend accidently biting into a Hershey's candy thinking it was milk chocolate, but then realizing it contained almonds. I myself have never had an allergic reaction to peanuts (Mine are very severe-- there is no for-sure answer if even the epipen could save me.), yet once to Almond Oil in a muffin.

It is very difficult to trust stores. The muffin was bought from a woman who confidently said that there were no nut products in her bakery... Wrong! Pure Almond Oil! Awful. Hives all over, vomiting... Very bad.

Other than that, I've been living with it for 10+ years. Yes, I do pass on birthday cakes and cupcakes... Yes, I do ask the Ice-Cream Stores to wash the scoopers under the faucet before they scoop out my vanilla (which I keep a watchful eye on.. just incase.)

I'm just telling all of you parents out there-- please let your kid understand that living with PA isn't that hard if you understand about it! It's crucial to get across how severe it is, even if they refuse to listen. It will get to them, somehow. Make sure that friends know how to use the EpiPen, just incase of an emergency... I find comfort in the fact that I always have friends that I can count on just in case something is to happen!

Anyways,
Farewell:
Lav

Posted on: Fri, 04/07/2006 - 1:33am
Claire's picture
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Joined: 04/19/2000 - 09:00

One thing about your post that frightens me is this. YOU yourself ask them to clean the scoop but if the person ahead of you got pb you may accidentally get it from the ice cream. My son will not eat any scooped out ice cream. I feel you could be in danger from even eating scooped out. They probably don't clean it well after everyone else.
Please be careful.
It sounds as if you are very cautious,but make me feel better. Don't eat scooped [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
MY son has never been made to feel different. HOwever my kids all know if we were all the same life would be boring.
Best of luck to you. claire

Posted on: Fri, 04/07/2006 - 1:51am
starlight's picture
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Joined: 01/16/2004 - 09:00

Welcome, always nice to have more younger people. I'm 23, just graduated from college. I'm only PA and I haven't had a reaction since I was 3 or 4.
I occasionally will take some chances with the "made in" warnings too (with epipen and benedryl close at hand) but something I've learned here is that it's one thing to take a chance with a "made in a facility" and quite another thing to take a chance with "made on shared equpiment". Like US Kit-Kats, I think are made in the same building as reeses or whatever, but not in the same room (or so I've heard). There is still risk there, BUT if they stick the shared eqipment on it, they might not wash the line before they run your thing, so there's a very real and higher chance it'll be coated in peanut residue or actually have bits on peanut in it. Not trying to be preachy or anything, just saying you may want to watch that. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Fri, 04/07/2006 - 1:33am
Claire's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/19/2000 - 09:00

One thing about your post that frightens me is this. YOU yourself ask them to clean the scoop but if the person ahead of you got pb you may accidentally get it from the ice cream. My son will not eat any scooped out ice cream. I feel you could be in danger from even eating scooped out. They probably don't clean it well after everyone else.
Please be careful.
It sounds as if you are very cautious,but make me feel better. Don't eat scooped [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
MY son has never been made to feel different. HOwever my kids all know if we were all the same life would be boring.
Best of luck to you. claire

Posted on: Fri, 04/07/2006 - 1:51am
starlight's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/16/2004 - 09:00

Welcome, always nice to have more younger people. I'm 23, just graduated from college. I'm only PA and I haven't had a reaction since I was 3 or 4.
I occasionally will take some chances with the "made in" warnings too (with epipen and benedryl close at hand) but something I've learned here is that it's one thing to take a chance with a "made in a facility" and quite another thing to take a chance with "made on shared equpiment". Like US Kit-Kats, I think are made in the same building as reeses or whatever, but not in the same room (or so I've heard). There is still risk there, BUT if they stick the shared eqipment on it, they might not wash the line before they run your thing, so there's a very real and higher chance it'll be coated in peanut residue or actually have bits on peanut in it. Not trying to be preachy or anything, just saying you may want to watch that. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

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