PA Daughter overcame milk allergy - nuts next?

Posted on: Thu, 08/03/2000 - 9:39am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

My 3 year old daughter was diagnosed with a severe milk allergy at 7 weeks of age. The second time she tried milk formula she was covered in hives from head to toe, choking, and finally, unconcious. We rushed her to the hospital when I realized I couldn't tell if she was breathing or not. It took about 10 minutes for the doctor to figure out the dose of benadryl to give her, because she was so tiny. In hindsight I realize this was an anaphylactic reaction, and she was indeed breathing, it was just that she was in a deep, unrousable sleep from a drop in blood pressure.

I was advised to continue breast-feeding and avoid milk products myself (which I didn't do because I was an allergy ignoramus back then!). We were advised to give her soy formula when weaning from the breast, and we weren't to try her on cow's milk until she was 1 year old, and only in the doctor's office. Every 3 months after her 1st birthday we gave her a 1/4 tsp. of milk and she broke out in hives every time until she was 2 1/2 years old.

Now she drinks at least 12 oz. of milk every day, eats cheese and briefly enjoyed ice cream (until the PA diagnosis). If she can outgrow this severe allergy, is there any hope for the peanut allergy? Has anyone out there outgrown an anaphylaxis to a certain food?

Posted on: Thu, 08/03/2000 - 11:39am
mkruby's picture
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Joined: 05/01/2000 - 09:00

It is my understanding that peanut and shellfish are two of the main allergies that you will more than likely never outgrow. It is also my understanding that girls, more than boys, diagnosed with allergies after the age of 5 are more than likely to keep their allergies throughout their life, with variances in their reactions.
I was told that my son may outgrow his milk allergy, but to never expect the boys to outgrow their severe allergy to peanut and shellfish for my second son. We still have the milk allergy though, not anaphylaxis though.

Posted on: Thu, 08/03/2000 - 11:14pm
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

I would not expect a peanut allergy to be outgrown, either. I have read of instances wherein if a child has a very very low Ige count to peanuts and peanuts are avoided completely for a number of years, then sometimes pa can be outgrown.

Posted on: Fri, 08/04/2000 - 4:46am
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Joined: 08/03/2000 - 09:00

Not to be a gloom monger but first coma at 5, turning 44 next week and still gripping my Epi. When I was 5, 150,000 PA's in the US today I read 3,000,000. It gets worse every year, peanuts are used more and more as cheap filler for so many products. The future is not any brighter. Look at products like Ortega taco shells, made from genetically alter corn. They alter the corn with DNA from the Brazil nut. Guess what, I can't eat the altered corn. I've known to avoid those little blue and yellow corn bread boxes and taco shells long before reading about altered crops.
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Posted on: Fri, 08/04/2000 - 5:21am
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Joined: 04/23/2000 - 09:00

Does corn bread have peanuts in it? (this may sound like a stupid question for most but I don't cook)

Posted on: Fri, 08/04/2000 - 6:23am
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Joined: 08/03/2000 - 09:00

Oops! Sorry to alarm. It's way out there but the severity of my reactions led me to look at genetically altered corn crops. It is a big issue for European farmers, US farmers are not quite as concerned. They alter the corn to prevent desiese and build in an insect repellent.
Introducing the DNA from the Brazil nut is part of this change. The article I read, sorry I can't quote it, mentions several products by name that use this new corn. I am serious all specialist are baffled by my severity, and I had not been able to eat that corn bread for three years before seeing the article in my allergist office.

Posted on: Fri, 08/04/2000 - 6:23am
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

emom - My PA daughter just polished off a big loaf of cornbread yesterday. I made it in my bread machine, so as far as I know the cornmeal wasn't made with the altered corn/brazil nut stuff mentioned in the above post. I would say it's safe to eat store bought cornbread as long as you check the ingredients, just as you would do with everything else.
Also, the corn that was altered wasn't using peanut genes, just brazil nut genes (do they have genes? I'm no scientist! LOL). Anyway if you're not tree nut allergic, that product would be fine for you.

Posted on: Fri, 08/04/2000 - 7:01am
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Joined: 08/03/2000 - 09:00

Again, sorry. Absolutely each individual has different levels of severity. I know and speak daily with four people each with various lists of can and cant's. I shouldn't be chatting at all but frustration from an event yesterday where my slice of pizza came in contact with a slice of Tai Chicken. The minor reaction seemed not to last long but the night was very uncomfortable and unnerving. If I didn't mention I should be a bubble boy. Living in fear of dryer vents, any scented fabric softener even having to leave the beach if someone uses Hawaiian Tropic.
Remember, plain M&M's added the disclaimer just several years ago. On the bright side, Mom always brought McD's on nut days and that was a new thing then. Also, my sisters made out like bandits on Halloween.
Hey, I'm not a Dr. nor wacko and I could be wrong (happens every day.) With all the parenting opinions I just wanted to share but vented.
I will go away now, sorry for taking up time.

Posted on: Fri, 08/04/2000 - 9:36am
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Joined: 04/23/2000 - 09:00

Pester--please don't go away!! My son ate some corn bread yesterday that's why I was questioning it. I guess if I cooked I would know.

Posted on: Sat, 08/05/2000 - 1:34pm
Shawn's picture
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Joined: 09/07/1999 - 09:00

Just got the latest issue of Food Alergy News - it says that in a study of school-aged PA children in England, of those who had had their first peanut-allergic reactions before age 2, "roughly 5 - 20 percent became tolerant." Hopefully, some of your children will be in that fortunate group, and not have to deal with this allergy for life.

Posted on: Mon, 08/07/2000 - 3:14am
browell's picture
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Joined: 04/23/2000 - 09:00

Wow that sure would be nice. I wonder what the best actions are in regards to becoming more tolerant. My son was diagnosed with pa when he was four months old. Is it best to avoid all of the foods he reacts to in order to make this tolerance more likely. For instance, I have not tried eggs or cow's milk yet and do not know how long to avoid this in his diet if I want him not to develop an allergy. Is it true that if I wait longer to introduce foods he will be less likely to have an allergy?

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