PA and allergies to soy, tree nuts, and legumes

Posted on: Sun, 12/21/2003 - 11:30pm
momma2boys's picture
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I found this while trying to figure out what my son is reacting too and Cindy suggested I post this sep. so it doesnt get hidden in my other thread. So here it is. Sadly my son appears to be in the 15% or less group that reacts to other legumes. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img]

here it is:

posted December 22, 2003 12:05 AM
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About 1.1% of Americans are allergic to peanuts, tree nuts, or both. Allergic reactions to peanuts or tree nuts account for the majority of fatal or near fatal food induced anaphylactic reactions. Peanuts are legumes and the sera of peanut-allergic individuals commonly contain IgE antibodies, which cross-react with similar proteins in other legumes such as apricots. However, less than 15% of such peanut-allergic patients react clinically to other member of the legume family (1). When reactions to other legumes do occur they are generally not severe. Therefore, complete avoidance of other legumes is not mandatory. Rather, a cautious trial of ingesting progressively larger amounts of non-peanut legumes is reasonable if desired by the family. It may be advisable to do such ingestion trials under close medical supervision.

Although peanuts are not true nuts, about 35% of peanut-allergic individuals are allergic to tree nuts or will develop such allergies (1). It was formerly thought that peanut allergy persisted life long in all cases. However, more recent studies have shown that clinical peanut allergy is lost in adolescence/adulthood in about 20% of cases particularly if such individuals have low levels of peanut specific IgE antibodies (<5kU/L) (1,2). Therefore, children with such low levels of peanut specific IgE antibodies can be periodically and cautiously re-evaluated to see if they have outgrown their peanut allergy.


Peanuts which are dry roasted at high temperatures are actually more allergenic, possibly because of an increased release of allergenic proteins, than are peanuts boiled or fried at somewhat lower temperatures. This may explain the higher incidence of peanut allergy in the USA (where peanuts are generally dry roasted) than in China where peanuts are consumed as much but are usually boiled or fried in preparation.

References
1. N Eng J Med 2002; 1294-99
2. Curr Opin Pediat 2001; 13:517-22

[This message has been edited by momma2boys (edited December 22, 2003).]

Posted on: Mon, 12/22/2003 - 1:57am
darthcleo's picture
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apricots are legumes???
I know my son reacted strongly (vomiting) to a very small amount of chickpeas. I gave him a carrot that had touched hummus in my plate. The reaction was instantaneous.
We avoid all legumes since then.

Posted on: Mon, 12/22/2003 - 4:32am
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My PA/Nuts/Asthma son has a Life Threatening Food Allergy to Lentils.

Posted on: Mon, 12/22/2003 - 4:35am
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Mommabear, do you know this through testing or reaction? Just wondering because of this statement:
When reactions to other legumes do occur they are generally not severe. Therefore, complete avoidance of other legumes is not mandatory.

Posted on: Mon, 12/22/2003 - 5:02am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

momma2boys, Jesse would *appear* to be solely PA right now (just turned 8). We have avoided all tree nuts because of cross contamination but when there was a walnut tree in the backyard of our last home, I did let him try one because there was no way that it could be cross-contaminated (and I was ready should he have a reaction). But still, not tree nuts for us.
Legumes on the other hand are something that I have never really worried about. As I think I posted to you last night, though can't remember because it got quite late, we just had peas within the last couple of days (probably last night [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/rolleyes.gif[/img] ) and Jesse ate them without a problem.
He has become fussy and not wanting to eat kidney beans and some other beans that were in a particular soup, so I just let him be and don't force him to eat anything that he doesn't want to eat. But he is able to pick out the offending legume from whatever he's eating and carry on eating, so he's obviously not allergic (if that makes sense).
With soy, again, Jesse has never had problem with it either, and he does ingest a lot of it (I think) and it's just something that I've started to question whether I should limit the intake of it or not.
Right now, Jesse would appear to be solely PA, we always just avoid tree nuts, so he might as well be TNA as well and the other legumes and soy we haven't had difficulty with yet, touch wood.
Happy Holidays! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------

Posted on: Mon, 12/22/2003 - 7:20am
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Quote:Originally posted by momma2boys:
[b]Mommabear, do you know this through testing or reaction? Just wondering because of this statement:
When reactions to other legumes do occur they are generally not severe. Therefore, complete avoidance of other legumes is not mandatory. [/b]
I note the word "generally". Also wondering if all such reactions get "reported". [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
My oldest son took one spoonful of lentil soup that *I* made from scratch. (There was no chance of cross contamination to Peanut product or a *delayed* reaction that *I* can think of ). [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] He had an anaphylactic reaction beginning almost instantly after the first spoonful. (Accompanied by him initially screaming and shouting "[i]something is wrong!!![/i]) I know each ingredient that went into the soup. He has since eaten each *ingredient* without any observable reaction [b]except for the lentils[/b]. He had eaten those same ingredients (except for the lentils with regularity prior to the incident. He had eaten lentils once or twice before and with hesitancy. (He never did like them). The physician agreed with us. No mention of "testing" was made. Even if it was "negative", [b]I still wouldn't give him lentils again.[/b] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Sorta like my youngest son's blood test for PA being "low" and him having eaten a peanut butter candy (by accident) with no observable reaction. [b]I still don't feed him peanut products.[/b] [i]Not even May Contains or Manufactured Ons or Made on the Same Equipment or Made in the Same Facility. [/i] Even though he has an incomplete diagnosis of PA and no "formal" diagnosis [b]as of yet[/b]. Maybe it's just me.
BTW, as it so happened, It was several years after our oldests son's first documented reaction to peanut product (approx age 12 months) before blood testing was completed. BTW again, as it so happened, his blood test (for PA) was performed [i]on the day he had an anaphylactic reation to the same.[/i] It was near 6000. BTW yet again, the physician had prescribed an Epi-Pen for our oldest son [b]before the blood test was administered,[/b] years earlier.
Just noting he also has Asthma. (Which by the way, [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] has [i]mysteriously improved this year[/i]. Even during the winter months, which were, previously, a period of excacerbation.
Absolutely not offering advice in any manner or form. Merely relaying my own *personal, highly individual, and unique* situation and experiences. Of which I have excersized my *right* and *perogative* as a parent within reasonable boundaries and supported by our physician. ie: Risk Vs. Benefit and informed decision. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] Other physicians and parents may or may not make similiar choices.
[This message has been edited by MommaBear (edited December 22, 2003).]

Posted on: Mon, 12/22/2003 - 11:22am
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Joined: 05/11/2004 - 09:00

My son has been allergic to peanuts since the age of three. At the age of 11 he tested positive for a soy allergy, and the allergist told us to avoid all legumes (though soy lecithin and soy oil were OK). At the age of almost 17 (a few months ago) he tested positive to almond, hazelnut and cashew. We have avoided all nuts since about the age of 5, when we were learning more about allergies. He thinks he reacted to the smell of pistachios, which is why he asked to be tested for nuts. He still eats products with soy lecithin (lots of candy [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]) and soy oil with no problems.

Posted on: Mon, 12/22/2003 - 11:30pm
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear:
[b] Sorta like my youngest son's blood test for PA being "low" and him having eaten a peanut butter candy (by accident) with no observable reaction. [b]I still don't feed him peanut products.[/b] [i]Not even May Contains or Manufactured Ons or Made on the Same Equipment or Made in the Same Facility. [/i] Even though he has an incomplete diagnosis of PA and no "formal" diagnosis [b]as of yet[/b]. Maybe it's just me.
[/b]
Forgot to mention a time frame here. The blood test on my youngest cub was performed [b]after[/b] he ate the peanut butter candy.
Reread the original question and for the sake of consistency will also mention [i]oldest[/i] cub also has a life threatening food allergy to some Nuts [b]that we know of and have formally identified [/b]. Still, [b]he avoids all nuts.[/b] We treat youngest cub similiarly, given family history, chances of cross contamination, incorrect identification (ie: what is that nut?), and overall risk (ie: given the risk, is it really necessary to eat such and such). I also think in the name of simplicity, it is preferrable (considering the reasons I just mentioned).
Absolutely not offering advice in any manner or form. Merely relaying my own *personal, highly individual, and unique* situation and experiences. Of which I have excersized my *right* and *perogative* as a parent within reasonable boundaries and supported by our physician. ie: Risk Vs. Benefit and informed decision. Other physicians and parents may or may not make similiar choices
[This message has been edited by MommaBear (edited December 23, 2003).]

Posted on: Mon, 12/22/2003 - 11:34pm
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Popping in again to mention youngest cub has tested a "low" positive (per blood) for soy. Among other things. As chance would have it never had oldest cub tested for soy.

Posted on: Mon, 12/22/2003 - 11:36pm
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So Mommabear, do you avoid all soy, or does he not react to it?

Posted on: Mon, 12/22/2003 - 11:38pm
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Quote:Originally posted by momma2boys:
[b]So Mommabear, do you avoid all soy, or does he not react to it?[/b]
Before I answer, could you please give your opinion on a question I have posed numerous times on the board? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] (I'm desperate here)

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