outgrown the peanut allergy!!!!

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My son is almost 6 and we have been dealing with this allergy for almost 5 years. He has gone to a peanut free preschool and we have never allowed any peanuts in our house - you know the drill... anyway we just had him retested and both his rast test and skin test came back negative!twice! He used to be very very allergic. If he even sat next to someone eating peanut butter he would break out in hives.Now his allergist says he can eat a peanut and won't get sick - not that he will but he can at least be around it now. I was so shocked it took 24 hours for me to even get it. John hopkins university has been testing kids and they said 18% of young children who can avoid any exposure to peanuts for 4 1/2 years have this chance. The younger they are the better the chance. There is a small blurb about this study in the September issue of Child magazine. There is no information yet as to redeveloping the allergy so we still live as a PA family but the immediate threat is gone. I thought this info. might be helpful or at least hopeful. christine

On Sep 29, 2000

That is fabulous! A dream come true. Great news, very happy for you and your family. I try not to hope he'll grow out of it (don't want to be disappointed) but I still have great hopes for a cure, vaccine, or whatever. Like you, I doubt I could ever bring myself to feed him peanuts, but to be relieved of worry about cross-contamination, etc., would be a great thing.

On Sep 30, 2000

Stine,

That's awesome! Stories like yours keep my hopes alive!

On Sep 30, 2000

Stine, Congratulations! That is wonderful news! I agree, I don't think I would ever take a peanut 'challenge' and actually give him peanuts, but it's nice to know you can breathe a little easier when we send them out into the world. Just getting through the day with my daughter now in kindergarten is a task for us with all the PB going around the lunchroom! Ugh!

On Sep 30, 2000

Congratulations!! I actually had tears in my eyes reading your post. It's everyone's dream come true.

On Sep 30, 2000

Fantastic!

On Sep 30, 2000

Stine,

GREAT NEWS!

I am curious...I have read that kids that grow out of their peanut allergy tend to:

1. Have lower end CAP RAST scores (<1.00) 2. Have no (or very few) other allergies 3. Do not have asthma

I am curious as to how many of these trends apply to your son.

What wonderful news. You are living all our dreams!

San

On Sep 30, 2000

Wow thats wounderful,its nice to hear that because it brings me hope for my daughter too. All the best......tan

On Sep 30, 2000

How wonderful! I am sure you are so excited and also relieved. I know this must be an exciting time and I pray that someday no one will ever have to worry about this allergy. I also don't keep my hopes high about my son outgrowing it but it is always in the back of my mind.

On Oct 1, 2000

Quote:

Originally posted by san103: [b]Stine,

GREAT NEWS!

I am curious...I have read that kids that grow out of their peanut allergy tend to:

1. Have lower end CAP RAST scores (<1.00) 2. Have no (or very few) other allergies 3. Do not have asthma

I am curious as to how many of these trends apply to your son.

What wonderful news. You are living all our dreams!

San [/b]

On Oct 1, 2000

to san103 just a quick note about my sons other allergies. When we originally had him tested his rast test was high and he had many other allergies: wheat, dairy,whey,green beans and lots of enviromental ones like mold and pollen. He was always sick. We did the elimination diet and he didn't any wheat or dairy until he was 2 1/2. Eventually he did outgrow all the other food allergies by the time he was 3 !/2 but we were told because he was so allergic to peanuts he would never outgrow it. But somehow he did. Although he has never had athsma he still is affected by seasonal allergies but we live in georgia where they are really bad.I still can not believe it!

On Oct 2, 2000

Stine, Have you taken the next step and had an oral challenge to determine if the other tests are correct? Places such as Mt. Sinia in New York have done these tests. They do skin tests etc. again there before doing tests where you don't know when the patient is actually being fed peanut. You may want to contact Dr. Sampson's office at Mt. Sinia or ask your board certified allergist if a hospital near you is conducting one of the studies. Let us know what you find out and decide to do, and if you do the test what the results are. They may put in an IV if they think there is a possibility of a reaction so they are ready to treat if a reaction occurs etc. To find out more you may want to contact one of the medical professionals conducting the study. I would not give our daughter anything with peanut until such a test was done in a place which should be able to treat (save) her if she had a reaction.

------------------ Stay Safe,

[email]"Chris@PeanutAllergy.Com"[/email]

On Oct 3, 2000

Chris -Thanks for your note. I was not aware of this kind of test. I told my son - who is about to turn 6 - that he still can not eat a peanut. We are planning to live as a PA family until he is 18 and moved out of the house! I was told that the theory is that a child that outgrows a peanut allergy might have a chance of redeveloping the allergy after a few exposures. I just desided not to take that chance. For me the only thing changing is the immediate life threat after eating a peanut. Which is a huge weight lifted now that that threat is gone.I just don't see a reason for him to ever eat a peanut. We never have it in the house and we don't miss it! His allergist even recommended he still be in a peanut free class and carry the epi pen and wear his braclet. Do you think that is crazy? I guess I was wondering why I should partcipate in the test where they make him eat a peanut? For science or just to know for sure? Just curious what others think.

On Oct 3, 2000

Congratulations!! I am like you, if I were in your shoes, I would still have a peanut free house. My son has been PA since 10 mos old. He is now 3, and never been exposed since he was 10 mos. We also hope he will outgrow since he was so young to be diagnosed, but I am not getting hopes too high. Our allergist recommends he be retested when he is closer to school age. He says, you never know, he may outgrow it. He also had environmental allergies. He had other food allergies, but we did the elimination test as well, and his only food allergy now is peanut. Best of luck! Amy

On Oct 3, 2000

Dr. Robert Wood gave a presentation during the last spring FAN conference in VA. He made the statement that at least one (if not more, I can't remember) child whose cap Rast test came back with a zero, showed a positive allergic response when undergoing an oral challenge. The child with a zero on the Cap Rast test certainly has a better chance of not being allergic to peanuts, then one who does have a positive number. However, it is my understanding that the only way to truly verify that a person has outgrown the allergy is to have the person undergo an oral challenge. I would not let my guard down until I was certain that my child was truly no longer allergic.

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