online reservations

Posted on: Fri, 01/15/1999 - 9:05pm
terry's picture
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Joined: 01/16/1999 - 09:00

I recently booked a flight online and during the process was asked about meal preference. This included vegetarian, diabetic, etc. but NOT peanut free. I wrote to the online reservation company & asked them to add this choice to there meal preferences. I would suggest that any of us that book online be sure to request that they include this in the future. With the current technology you are able to pick out seats on a flight, so we should be able to ask for a peanut free flight as well.

Posted on: Mon, 01/18/1999 - 11:14am
Larry's picture
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Joined: 01/18/1999 - 09:00

<p>It would be helpful if we could collect a listing of airlines that provide peanut-free flights. For example, I recently called the USAIRways 800 number and was able to book a flight where the airline agreed to not serve any peanuts during the flight.</p>

Posted on: Tue, 01/19/1999 - 3:26am
Mark's picture
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Joined: 01/19/1999 - 09:00

<p>It is my understanding that Air Canada and Canadian Airlines are peanut free for in flight snacks. They serve pretzels now on all flights. They are still not able to guarantee meals though because they are done by outside contracted caterers. Perhaps we should contact the caterers on this issue.</p>

Posted on: Tue, 01/26/1999 - 11:05pm
Patti's picture
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Joined: 01/27/1999 - 09:00

<p>I had a flight booked on Delta prior to knowing my 3 year old daughter had a peanut allergy. When I called Delta, I was told that I could only request that she not be served peanuts. I could not request peanut free flight or a buffer zone. Just thought everyone should know Delta was not very accomodating. I leave in one week and I will post any problems or if I get better results upon check-in. Any other tips for me let me know.</p>

Posted on: Wed, 01/27/1999 - 5:42am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

<p>Patti, I am sorry that Delta has chosen not to accommodate you. I would request from Delta's management to change your flight to an early morning flight due to their lack of accommodation. There is a lesser likelihood that peanuts will be served in the mornings.</p>
<p>My congress rep., Dennis Hastert, had noted in his letter to me that I should ask the airlines for peanut free flights. Unfortunately, he must have thought that the airlines would accommodate. Since you have specifically been rejected for a peanut free flight, you may want to write Dennis Hastert since he is now the Speaker of the House. I would document my request, who you spoke to and their response. In addition, I would not take the chance of flying with peanuts being served - I would ask Delta to accommodate you with a morning flight.</p>
<p>The Speaker of the House, Dennis Hastert's e-mail address is: [email]DHastert@mail.house.gov[/email]</p>

Posted on: Thu, 01/28/1999 - 3:35am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

<p>Patti, I am concerned with Delta's statement that you cannot request a peanut free flight. Their statement is incorrect. The Department of Transportation has left it up to the carriers to accommodate the peanut allergic population, unfortunately, as they see fit. Delta's statement is incorrect that you cannot request such an accommodation. Indeed you may request it - Delta has selected not to accommodate you. DOT is not allowed to use any funding to address the peanut restrictions until the completion of scientific peer review studies are completed. You may also want to write the Food Allergy Network and let them know of Delta's statement.</p>

Posted on: Mon, 02/15/1999 - 5:07am
Patti's picture
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Joined: 01/27/1999 - 09:00

<p>I just returned from my trip to WDW. I had previously posted that Delta was not being very cooperative (through their 800 number). I did however have great service from the flight attendants. Upon check-in I talked directly to the attendants and they actually took peanuts off the plane and replaced it with pretzels. On the way home it was already scheduled to be pretzels because I had them make a note. Just wanted to let everyone know to keep being persistent. Hopefully you eventually come across that caring person.</p>
<p>------------------</p>

Posted on: Mon, 03/01/1999 - 4:43am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

The scary thing about "buffer zones" on flights is the fact that even when a peanut free zone is requested for a particular flight, the same rows are not going to be used. Example: whatever row YOU are sitting in requires the buffer zone to be in front of you and behind you. The person on the PREVIOUS FLIGHT who sat in your seat may have eaten peanuts and the residue is on the magazines, seats, etc. In my opionion, the only way a true peanut buffer zone would work is for the exact same rows to be used each and every time, regardless if there is an allergic person on board or not. They would designate the same rows on each flight. The question is...is this possible to do?
Any feedback on this?

Posted on: Mon, 03/01/1999 - 6:34am
Patti's picture
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Joined: 01/27/1999 - 09:00

I say skip the buffer zone and get these flights peanut free!!!!! Mary just posted a link on RESEARCH which contains information on peanut allergic reactions on commercial airlines. There is no reason anyone with a fatal allergy should be 30,000 feet in the air. No one flies for the peanuts, lets just get them off the flights. I just recently flew for the first time and the anxiety was tremendous. I had delta remove the peanuts but you are right Connie what about the person before you. I did wipe down all trays, seatbelts etc., but I didn;t carry a vacuum for the seats. I just don't understand why we can't get these things off the flight. It's not like you can open a window and get some circulation going or leave the area. You are stuck. It is just so unneccessary. I am going to start making some noise again. Sorry to sound so angry but I am. I also read in that same article about the impairment on the quality of life for peanut allergy sufferers. I can't take it anymore.
Patti

Posted on: Mon, 03/01/1999 - 10:38am
dhumphries's picture
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Joined: 02/02/1999 - 09:00

I booked a flight for my family in May on Southwest, and after I was drilled by the reservationist about whether my son was allergic to peanut dust (like I am going to expose him to peanut dust just to see if he is!!) she said that they would not serve peanuts on any of our flights if I had a note from our allergist specifically saying that he should not be exposed to peanuts at all. As someone said on a recent post, why would they even demand a note from the allergist, do they really think someone is going to make this stuff up?

Posted on: Mon, 03/01/1999 - 12:55pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Isn't it amazing? Not only do we have to educate these individuals, we have to defend ourselves and the safety of our children.
Somebody, quick, screw in a lightbulb, these people are in the dark!

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