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Posted on: Thu, 02/23/2006 - 1:46am
MimiM's picture
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Joined: 10/10/2003 - 09:00

My son't school says that they are "peanut safe" but not "peanut free.
They do check ingredient labels on snacks served to the kids and allow the Mom's of food allergic kids to inspect the snack closet as often as they wish. No kids can bring peanut or nut products but I'm sure "may contain" slip through on occasion. For example, they won't send home a home made chocolate chip cookie that a child brings in his or her lunch but they will send home an item that is labelled as a "may contain".
I feel this is probably the best that one can ask of a school though.
The individual teachers have always been good about checking with me about certain products used.
I read in one of my son's weekly notices that they were going to be making chocolate chip cookies the following week. When I asked the teacher, she told me that they were using a mix from Cherrybrook kitchen!
(There is a boy in my son's class with a milk allergy)

Posted on: Thu, 02/23/2006 - 2:19am
pfmom2's picture
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Joined: 01/22/2006 - 09:00

Williamsmummy,
Sorry didn't mean to offend you if I did. I understand your point about all the other allergies in schools.
Yes, someone sneezing on a dairy allergic child with a mouthful milk would not at all be good. Maybe a dairy allergic child needs a dairy free table. I still think cleaning up milk is easier and no one says accidents aren't going to occur and that is why we still need to educate the schools on what to do when an allergic child of any allergen comes in contact or reacts at school.
Sorry again, was just stating my opinion just as you were, didn't mean to offend.

Posted on: Thu, 02/23/2006 - 5:37am
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Joined: 05/23/2005 - 09:00

Okay, I was just going to read and not post, but....
We keep talking about fair. Is it fair that my dd may have to be homeschooled because the other kids can't avoid nuts five meals out of the week?? Someone else talked about wanting their child to learn how to navigate a world that will have nuts in it. True. However, my dd is already doing that in stores, friends houses, movie theatres and everywhere else we go in public. I would like her to be able to focus on learning in school and not anaphalaxis. (Yes, I know she will still have to deal with in in a nut free school, but at least it would be to a lesser extent). I don't think anyone would ask a child with a bee allergy to go into a room with a hundred invisible bees that don't let you know when they sting (you just get to find out when your throat closes up or you fall into a coma). Oh, and amen to Gail. Great post.
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Sara

Posted on: Thu, 02/23/2006 - 6:25am
Corvallis Mom's picture
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Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

I guess what bugs me most about these discussions (yes, even [i]here[/i] ) is that there just doesn't seem to be a basic understanding that what is right for one person isn't for another.
This is why I for one am reluctant to support a "One Size Fits Most" approach to school risk management legislation.
I'm not saying that a Peanut-restricted environment is right for all PA children. I would just like it if FAAN and other parents would quit saying it isn't right [b]for mine.[/b] You don't know my child.
There really [b]are[/b] children for whom it is the only appropriate thing... and even if they are rare, it is still better for other parents and knowledgeable people to make statements which include "rarely" rather than "not" necessary.
And that includes other allergens as well. But the facts are that PN is just plain more likely to be lethal on a per capita basis.
[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]

Posted on: Thu, 02/23/2006 - 10:46am
SaraM's picture
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Joined: 05/23/2005 - 09:00

I guess I'm confused and maybe someone can enlighten me. Who does it hurt if a school is peanut free? I guess it will inconvienience some parents who send PB&J a lot, but I honestly believe that most people (if properly educated as to WHY peanut free is important and are given possible lunch/snack alternatives) will follow the rules. I also firmly believe that a few will not. But I feel that my kid is a whole lot safer with a few kids bringing peanut butter (which the lunch staff will hopefulle catch) than practically the whole school. Let's face it: making a school "peanut free" will not make it so. But it's a heck of an improvement.
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Sara

Posted on: Fri, 02/24/2006 - 1:09am
turtle's picture
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Joined: 12/10/2004 - 09:00

I think FAIR and SAFE are interesting words. Life isn't fair-period. Never has been, never will. And safe is relative. What is safe for one child is not necessarily safe for another.

Posted on: Fri, 02/24/2006 - 5:19am
MimiM's picture
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Joined: 10/10/2003 - 09:00

I don't particularly like the terms "peanut free" or even "peanut safe" (the latter being what I mentioned my son's school claims) because I think it causes confusion to people. It fails to mention that all nuts are included.
If "free" and "safe" aren't good terms, how about "nut controlled"?...I don't know.

Posted on: Fri, 02/24/2006 - 5:32am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

My son attends a "reduce the risk" school. I'm not even clear, from what I've seen, how hard they try to "reduce the risk".
I liked it better when he was younger and they ate in the classroom and the classroom as "peanut free".
There have also been posts on this board by other members in the Province I live in, where there were different "allergen free" classrooms.
I, personally, believe it's do-able. I have only changed my position about my guy sitting at the "peanut free" BENCH because of his age (10) and it's not like I have a warm comfie feeling about it; but he hated the BENCH and I hated the BENCH and the BENCH was wrong.
I probably have a lot more I could add - Sara M. is it your posts I have really liked?
At any rate, I have (in the past) been adamant about my son's *rights* to education. As I say, I could probably add a lot more, but my mind is rather a blank right now.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
"That was Polanski. Nicholson got his nose cut."

Posted on: Fri, 02/24/2006 - 5:34am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

You know what I would find interesting (and it might just be me [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img] ) is having the different answers that people could choose from in that poll posted as separate topics and discussion of those answers thereof.
I mean, there's a reason we all feel the way we do and a reason why we all checked whatever box we did end up checking.
I'll see if I can wrap my mind around doing that next week if someone else can't.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
"That was Polanski. Nicholson got his nose cut."

Posted on: Fri, 02/24/2006 - 10:52am
SaraM's picture
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Joined: 05/23/2005 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by turtle:
[b]I think FAIR and SAFE are interesting words. Life isn't fair-period. Never has been, never will. And safe is relative. What is safe for one child is not necessarily safe for another. [/b]
I think we all know life is not fair (none of us would be on this web site if it were). But I firmly believe that the world is what WE make of it. All I'm trying to do is level the playing field for my daughter. And I'm confused about the point that "what is safe for one child may not be safe for another"--are there kids out there that will die if they DON'T have nuts at school? And this I also know-the day someone puts my kid on a bench to eat is the day that person better FEAR me (best of luck to you and your little guy, csc--I really feel for you guys).
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Sara

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