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Posted on: Sat, 01/10/2004 - 4:14am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Karen H., great post! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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Posted on: Sat, 01/10/2004 - 7:05am
arachide's picture
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Joined: 08/16/2000 - 09:00

Just wanted to say that I found the latest posts citing specific examples of accomodations very interesting.
Quote:Originally posted by Gail W:[b]
~Due to the child's specific, restricted diet, the parents want the school to change its exisiting policies related to food brought into the school by parents/children. The parents do not want any food at any school-sponsored event (including classroom parties) because, due to his disbility, their child cannot participate. They claim that the school providing food (or authorizing others to bring in food at a school-sponsored event) is unfair and discriminatory under ADA.[/b]
Food-free schools...
(for MB's crystal ball):
Would public response be more sympathetic arguing from the childhood obesity perspective as opposed to the food allergy perspective. And do we (here who deal with FAs) really care as long as the result is the same?
The ends justify the means?

Posted on: Sat, 01/10/2004 - 7:25am
Gail W's picture
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Joined: 12/06/2001 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by KarenH:
[b]The kids who have parents that won't back down get the most accomodation (as usually are labeled as difficult parents). The kids whose parents don't say a thing....usually suffer.[/b]
As one who wouldn't "back down", I agree... But I think it's also important to add that I worked equally hard to avoid the "difficult parent" label. It is defintely possible.
As for the 4 children with PA who enrolled at our school after we helped create district-wide procedures... their parents didn't [i]have[/i] to "say a thing" and have the exact same accommodations as my dd. It's now just "standard procedure" for any student with PA.
[This message has been edited by Gail W (edited January 10, 2004).]

Posted on: Sat, 01/10/2004 - 8:01am
Gail W's picture
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Joined: 12/06/2001 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by Gail W:
[b]~Due to the child's specific, restricted diet, the parents want the school to change its exisiting policies related to food brought into the school by parents/children....[/b]
arachide, you know that I was just putting this forward in the hypothetical, right?
So good to see you engaged in discussion again.

Posted on: Sat, 01/10/2004 - 8:53am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

arachide, I think you may be on to something. I mentioned this in I don't know what thread now about how things that affect the ALL or can potentially affect the ALL are more easily accepted and accommodated than say PA. For example, "smoke free". Got it. Has the potential to affect ALL people if not "smoke free". I'm not sure what thread it is in and my mind feels quite hazy right now.
However, since we all know that obesity is becoming a major problem and we don't like foods used in the schools as incentive, etc., but if it's something that can potentially affect the ALL, like obesity can, I think the obese would have a greater chance of getting the same accommodations that we're basically asking for our PA children. Do you know what I mean?
(What does KWIM mean?)
Gail W., it's wonderful that you have been able to be precedent setting without being seen as a difficult parent. I wish that had been my experience. I would just so love to be seen as not being difficult in my requirements of the school.
I did work really closely with Jesse's first principal, although it did involve superintendent involvement as well and I was probably seen as a difficult parent, but we finally got a *reduce the risk* school (albeit one without written guidelines by the time I had left) and the four new PA children that entered the school after Jesse already had everything in place for them.
I think there is also a difference between being seen as a difficult parent or an involved parent. Of course, sometimes you can be both. Sometimes you can be neither. Sometimes you can be one or the other. For example, I know even myself, I can certainly be perceived at the school as difficult because of my requirements (which have not changed since Jesse started school and I actually don't think is asking for too much) while not being considered involved and vice versa.
Anyway.
Again, people should not be allowed to have children unless they know how to drive and have a vehicle to transport them in. I have to go out in the bloody cold and get some stuff in and I am not looking forward to it one bit.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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Posted on: Sat, 01/10/2004 - 9:09am
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by arachide:
[b]Just wanted to say that I found the latest posts citing specific examples of accomodations very interesting.
Food-free schools...
(for MB's crystal ball):
Would public response be more sympathetic arguing from the childhood obesity perspective as opposed to the food allergy perspective. And do we (here who deal with FAs) really care as long as the result is the same?
The ends justify the means? [/b]
Does the means you describe [i]need[/i] justification?
I'm thinking more along the lines of "A rose by any other name................" [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/cool.gif[/img]
And yes, quite possibly, there is more to be gained through collaberation than isolation. WRT to *special interest* groups and beyond. Seems to be a common theme in the universe. Be helpmeets for one another, I mean. (But not really in the biblical sense of the word, just the general idea. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img])

Posted on: Sat, 01/10/2004 - 9:52am
Gail W's picture
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Joined: 12/06/2001 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by Alternative to Mainstream:
[b]... things that affect the ALL or can potentially affect the ALL are more easily accepted and accommodated than say PA. [/b]
Example:
We wanted handwashing instituted both before and especially after lunch to reduce peanut butter residue getting around the school. But our request was met with some resistence because, the school principal said, it would be difficult to implement. However when my husband pointed to multiple studies showing how basic handwashing decreases the transmission illness (translation: better attendance) at school, they were all much more receptive and it didn't seem as difficult to implement. (And, BTW, handwashing procedures are in effect under the justification that it "is good for everyone".)
A rose is a rose is a rose...

Posted on: Sat, 01/10/2004 - 11:49pm
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by Gail W:
[b] However when my husband pointed to multiple studies showing how basic handwashing decreases the transmission illness (translation: better attendance) at school, they were all much more receptive and it didn't seem as difficult to implement. [/b]
Sort of "off topic"..... [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]........ but does "better attendance" = "more $$$" for the school?

Posted on: Sun, 01/11/2004 - 12:22am
Gail W's picture
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Joined: 12/06/2001 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear:
[b]... does "better attendance" = "more $$$" for the school?[/b]
We've wondered the same thing. Not sure. I think it might depend on reporting. The school has always seemed very motivated to document that the absence is due to illness.
I've noticed that whenever I call the school to report my kid(s) absence, the secretary specifically asks, "Are they sick?" And if I haven't called in to report the absence, the school nurse calls and asks "if the child is sick?" These questions have made me wonder if there is a stat sheet the school uses. Wonder if funding depends on the [i]reason[/i] a child is not in attendance. They seem very motivated to document that the absence is due to illness.
I've wondered what would happen if, as we have considered, I were to answer her "no, I'm keeping my child home out of protest because she isn't safe". I'd guess that's a different "box" for her to tick and funding [i]would[/i] be effected.
In any event, the fact that handwashing was "good for everyone" was the rationale that was well received (both staff and parents) and used to justify new handwashing routines.... no mention of food allergies.

Posted on: Sun, 01/11/2004 - 4:01am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Excellent, Gail W.! When presented with something you wanted for your PA child, but had benefits for the ALL, it was accepted.
Is that how your schools receive funding in the U.S.? Depending on how many children are in attendance and why they are not there on a particular day?
I don't know how schools receive funding here in Canada.
For some reason, I've always felt the need to be very specific when I call the kids in sick - asthma flare-up, whatever. Even when I go into the school to sign one of the children out sick, I'm very specific about why they're leaving. But that's just me. I've never had the secretary question me as to why they were not in school, usually because I'm able to determine in the middle of the night most times and call and leave a message.
We do have a program here where they simply want to make sure each child is safe (Canadians could tell me what it's called) and if your child is not at school and you have not called, there is supposed to be a list of people that the school can call to check on your child's whereabouts to make sure that they are, in fact, at least at home and not missing on the way to school.
I do know that for my DH, he was given a telephone tree at the beginning of the school year - one student calls two students who then call two students, etc. if the college was going to be closed. This was due to funding for the college, but not sure how it worked. But say there was a wicked snow storm and the college was closed, the students were notified early enough in the morning to get on their phone tree and start making calls. Then, the college would still receive funds for the day even though they had to close.
As far as the students themselves attending, well, they're college students, have paid their tuition and who gives a toss?
I am so upset right now. So, we've been beaten down with this horrible coldness outside for days. Remembering correctly as I travelled to Ottawa earlier in the week, it was snowing. But Tuesday, it was fine. It was still bloody cold Monday even with the snow. So, all week has been horrible.
I get up this morning to let the dog out and what do I find? We're in the middle of a snow storm.
Now, I'm trying to think if I can put a positive spin on travelling out in it or if I'm going out with a face on me like a madman's ar** which my Grandmother always used to say and is something I never understood. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/eek.gif[/img] (if anyone does know what it means, except that you look disagreeable, please let me know).
Aside from funding, wouldn't DEVOTED school administrators want better attendance regardless of money?
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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