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Posted on: Fri, 02/02/2007 - 8:32am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

M was also on Zantac, beginning four or five weeks after birth, and ending when I tried a taste of it myself. It was awful stuff for an infant - the taste and kick of pepppermint schnapps.
Discontinuing it (no problem with our second, non-prescribing ped) didn't make the slightest difference in the phenomenal spitting up - we'd SOAK a full size receiving blanket after each nursing. (I cracked up the first time I helped with a Salvation Army project for new moms - they included a hanky sized "burp cloth" probably a tenth the size...)
We were also using Propulsid, per. ped number one - who also insisted we supplement with soy formula (whole 'nother story there). Just as glad we moved out of his territory.
Somewhat more on topic - M is among the "exquisitely" allergic - and I've just been through a lovely conversation about "bubbles" with a family member who ought to know better. (We've been dealing with this for almost a decade, and M's doctor has said that we're doing exactly what we need to be doing in M's case. Any "sense of security" we may have, outside of our home, *is,* in our case, false. It wasn't this way for the first four or so years, but it's our current reality.)
Personally, I prefer a bubble to a coffin.
With that, I share my first effective response to the bubble bit - it actually stopped that part of the conversation cold. It is hereby my standard answer.
Sue

Posted on: Fri, 02/02/2007 - 9:32am
chanda4's picture
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Joined: 12/14/2006 - 09:00

About the reflux...2 of my kids have it terribly, enought to be put on Zantac and Prevacid from about 6weeks old. At age 2 my son Carson had his first endoscopy....turns out he had a hiatal hernia, no amount of meds would help him. We had it surgically corrected(Nissen Fundoplasty). His reflux has stopped, he can't even puke anymore....but his tummy pain contines. So now back to the doc...when my youngest reaches age 2, we will check her, she has worse reflux then her brother.
But I choose to continue the meds....it's that or sheer pain. I had it my last trimester of pregnancy, wouldn't wish that on anybody...fodd and acid coming back up into my mouth, nonstop....it hurt and it was horrible.
Just wanted to share.
LisaM....my 3yr old also has eosinophilic esophagitis and has been under steriod treatment. Both his allergist and his GI said it is worsened by his food allergies and also enviromental(breathing of allergens). It has caused him alot of pain. Chanda
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Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)

Posted on: Fri, 02/02/2007 - 10:16am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Chanda -
Do they have a children's version of Zantac?
We had such a time getting the stuff into M - who was otherwise a really happy baby. I wonder, looking back, if M's throat was already irritated from the reflux, and the Zantac just added to the burning sensation?
I never checked to see if there might be a more mildly flavored version for little ones - ped #2 didn't suggest, and I didn't even think of it at the time. M was otherwise thriving - 22 lbs at six months, later on.
Pain didn't seem to be an issue after the first two months or so - just an amazing amount of spitting up.
We had no experience with food allergies at that point, and nothing to measure our experience against "normal" - M was our first, and we'd just moved 2000 miles from family/friends.
I've learned quite a bit along the way! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]
Sue

Posted on: Fri, 02/02/2007 - 10:39am
chanda4's picture
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Joined: 12/14/2006 - 09:00

Sue....they have a liquid Zantac, it does taste very peperminty....but for me, I'd rather give the med's then have them in pain. Carson was very healthy, 24lbs at age 1(allergic to milk and eggs at that point)...but he did stop eating(I did a trial taking him off his meds....he wouldn't eat) so it was the zantac and then a dissovable prevacid twice a day. I now have his sister(1yr) on Zantac and Prilosec(we don't have RX anymore, so buy over the counter tablets) so I cut a tablets in 1/4 and she swollows them in a bite of applesauce. Doc said it was okay as long as she could swollow them.
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Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)

Posted on: Fri, 02/02/2007 - 12:19pm
TwokidsNJ's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2005 - 09:00

BriandBri, your statistics miss the point that parents of allergic children (and the children once old enough) must be constantly vigilant and watch every bite of food that goes in the mouth. You have to eat to survive; riding a bike is a fun leisure activity. I think your analogies are irrelevant, really.
And, your comments about Munchausens are ridiculous. Food allergies DO require constant vigilance, and communication. It is this NECESSARY communication that creates a perception of Munchausens. But without this communication (ie, talking to teachers/principal/nurse/parents), the child will be at more risk. I think you are being quite disrespectful to many of us that handle our allergies differently than you do.
My strategies are working, regardless of whether some opinionated person that lacks empathy thinks I have Munchausens. Usually it's those opinionated ones that would be the same ones screaming the loudest if it was their kid.

Posted on: Fri, 02/02/2007 - 12:49pm
Carefulmom's picture
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Joined: 01/03/2002 - 09:00

Yes, the statistic 4 in 100,000 is totally irrelevant. We all know that the chance of someone without food allergies to have food induced anaphylaxis is 0. That doesn`t help us any. What is relevant is the chance of someone with food allergies to have food induced anaphylaxis. He doesn`t state that. Since I do a ton of medical reading, I must comment that for a doctor to look at an illness and then give a percentage based mostly on people who don`t have that illness is not well founded scientifically. Most studies do not do their statistics that way. For example, if I am reading studies on breast cancer and they quote a mortality rate, it is what percentage of people with breast cancer die from it. It is usually not a study on breast cancer quoting what percent of those with and without breast cancer die from it. Very unscientific of this doctor. He needs to go back to medical school and take a statistics class.

Posted on: Fri, 02/02/2007 - 2:11pm
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Hi Everyone,
Here is all I am going to say. I am not going to quote anyone--just my simple thoughts.
I don't care about numbers. I have been through all the numbers with the allergist, but all I needed to see was the actual reaction. Peanuts/Tree Nuts = anaphylactic reactions.
That is all that matters. I don't need in stats on occurance or probablity. I have seen what the allergens do to my 3 children and that is ALL I need.
As far as the discussions before about contact allergic being 'worse case scenario', this is NOT worse case scenario for some. This is everyday life scenario. Matter of fact: Come into contact with the allergen by touch, inhalation, or ingestion, you WILL have a reaction. No maybe about it, and this is what scares me about statements that are made in the news.
Lay people, people without children who suffer from anaphylactic reactions, see an article like this, and just take everything that M.D. says as law. Totally then disregard me--ME--who has the children with the allergies. All of the sudden, I look like I am overly protective or worse.
I want my children to understand that as they grow older and have to manage their allergies themselves, most people are not going to understand their allergies. It is their responsibility to manage their lives, but not in grade school. This is to be a carefree time for my children. I hate that they have to even think about dying, that something in their environment could kill them. They know this, I did not have to tell them this, they have been through the reaction. They should NOT have to go to a place, that "I" pay for with my tax money, that sends them into distress. There is NO reason for this, it is like waving a gun at their head. Hey, I smoke, but only outside. I am over 18, and cigarettes are legal, where are my rights? Why can't I smoke wherever I want? This is reaching, I know, but why is banning the particular(deathly serious) allergen from their school wrong? I just don't get it.
As far as the stats above about asthma and bike riding, whoever posted that-no offense to you personally, but my son has asthma. We manage his asthma, it is our responsibility to keep him safe. Difference between FA's and asthma is having the reaction from your environment, caused by someone else. Asthma is just not the same. And bikes, well, I don't let them ride in traffic, they wear helmets. I am not going to send them around dangerous places where SOMEONE else could hit them, I believe I would be taken to prison if I allowed that kind of danger into their lives.
I just want to make the safest, carefree environment for my children. Doesn't everyone want the same? FA's are a disability, if our children suffered some other type of disability wouldn't we be going after every accomadation to make their life safe. One more thing, we have a friend that got 504 accomadations for college, he is ADD. He got someone to take notes for him in class. Now, the difference is:
not being able to concentrate vs possible death from others around you
Why is this even a discussion.
Not mad at anyone inparticular at all, just really frustrated tonight. This is my rant for the week, OK, for the month. I just get tired of people that don't understand.
Sorry for the ramble.
------------------
Stacie - Mother to:
11 yr. PA
8 yr. TNA
3 yr. PA&TNA

Posted on: Fri, 02/02/2007 - 10:20pm
Going Nuts's picture
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Joined: 10/04/2001 - 09:00

Personally, I'm not terribly offended by this article. Something I think we need to keep in mind is that on this board, we are a somewhat self-selecting group. That is to say, we probably have children who tend to be on the more severe end of the spectrum - that's why we've sought out this board in the first place.
As for the difficulty in diagnosing PA, or any food allergy, he's right. Of course again, most of us here have met that standard of care. Not so for everyone. I'm not offended by his statement about people who think their children have allergies, but really don't, because I know someone like that. She claims her children are allergic to dairy, because she noticed that her elder child got a little "mucousy" when he had milk when he was a toddler. [i]We[/i] might not be those people, but let's face it, they do exist. However, I do understand what you mean about the general public misinterpreting his statement and thinking we're all a bunch of loons.
Finally, he ends the article with: [i]
"Finally, despite their best attempts to avoid peanuts and carefully read labels, the average person with true peanut allergy still gets a reaction every three to five years. Yet only one in three parents of allergic children has a potentially life-saving dose of EpiPen nearby and knows how to use it. Affected children should never be without an EpiPen and someone who knows how to use it."[/i] ,
which I think nicely underscores the seriousness of the allergy.
As for Anne Munoz Furlong, she has done more for us as a group than any other single person out there. I don't have to agree with everything that comes out of her mouth to support her in general. For people like me who have been dealing with this for a long time and remember what it was like before there was the level of awareness that exists now, I'll tell you - what she has accomplished is huge. And please keep in mind she represents people with all FAs, not just peanut.
School bans. Tough subject. My son is in the 7th grade, and other than preschool has never attended a peanut-free school. Might I have wished his school had been peanut free? Maybe. Where there some tense moments over the years? A few. But he's never had a reaction in school, and he is both contact and airborne sensitive. With a cooperative school administration, it really can be done. I think many times bans become necessary due to lack of cooperation and imagination. While I've never sought out a total ban, and know it would never work in our particular district, I support those for whom it is truly necessary. I just don't think it's necessary as often as many people think it is.
I think that FAs are a really emotional issue for those of us here, understandably. But I don't think we should let our emotions keep us from thinking critically and rejecting information that doesn't fit our personal realities.
I know I'm in the minority, but that's my $.02.
Amy
[This message has been edited by Going Nuts (edited February 03, 2007).]

Posted on: Sat, 02/03/2007 - 4:58am
TwokidsNJ's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2005 - 09:00

I think this Doctor's ending of his article was his attempt to cover himself because he knew he was being flippant in the other 90% of his article.

Posted on: Sat, 02/03/2007 - 10:43am
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Joined: 11/04/2005 - 09:00

Hi Chanda, Thanks for the info. on e.e. That's great that your child was diagnosed--from what I hear there aren't that many docs who are aware of ee. I have some questions, but I'll start a new thread on the "main discussion board" so as not to hijack this one too much [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
"LisaM....my 3yr old also has eosinophilic esophagitis and has been under steriod treatment. Both his allergist and his GI said it is worsened by his food allergies and also enviromental(breathing of allergens). It has caused him alot of pain. Chanda"

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