Not being selfish, just don\'t know...

Posted on: Sun, 01/13/2008 - 1:15pm
CatsMom's picture
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Joined: 01/09/2008 - 06:31

Ok, I feel reallly selfish posting this, but I need to know. Our dd is allergic to peanuts/wheat/eggs...I have been diligently trying to find things for her to eat with not much luck, but it's only been a week. Her wheat/egg allergies came back from a scratch test as a 2 and her peanut came back as a 4. I totally get the peanut allergy so have cleaned out all peanut related things we had...However, the egg and wheat is a different story.
*sounding selfish here* Do we need to stop eating wheat and eggs and remove all items with these ingredients in them?

I think her allergic reaction comes in the form of eczema...with that be the worst that will happen with the numbers given above? She has also had some nasty nasty diapers lately..I now think that is related to one of her allergies, but not sure which one. If these are the worst, is it wrong to keep things around?

I just dont know and am not happy with how the allergist kind of left me out in the dark about everything.

Anyway, I just want to know so I can better take care of my dd.

Posted on: Sun, 01/13/2008 - 3:25pm
Krusty Krab's picture
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Joined: 04/20/2007 - 09:00

Of course you're not being selfish, you just don't have alot of info to go on yet. :) I am assuming your DD was tested because of her excema, correct? Has she eaten PB before? Has she had reactions like hives, or a full blown anaphylactic reaction? How does the doctor recommend you treat her for an exposure to her allergen? The reason I ask so much is because I have 2 kids with different FA's and based on their history's I have formed diff. comfort zones for each. One child is ana. and we do not have any of the allergen in the house. The other child's history has been hives and a little runny nose...we still have those allergens in the home, but he does not consume or touch. The differences might not make sense to others, but I make no apologies.:)
It's all about what works for you and your family....safety being first. If you are dealing with a child with severe contact/anaphylactic reactions, if it were me, I'd say I would not allow the allergen in the house. If you're dealing with a child who reacts with excema, well that may be different depending on how comfortable you are with keeping the allergens in the home, how good you are at keeping it from her.
One thing I would do until you talk further with the allergist, is to be careful to avoid cross contamination of cooking utensils, surfaces, eating utensils. Read labels diligently. Carry your epis and benadryl at all times and know how to use them....that is if you have these meds. If you don't, you need to find out why/how the allergist suggests you deal with any returning excema or additional symptoms like hives (i'm assuming you already know about uses for benadryl).
The numbers from the RAST do not always predict severity of reaction but moreso the [i]liklihood[/i] of a reaction occurring. That is to say, sometimes a person with a low rast will experience anaphylaxis, or a person with a high rast will not experience a severe reaction. [i]History [/i]of reaction generally is important to note. If a child presents with anaphylaxis, well you know for sure you're dealing with something quite severe. One thing to note, that [i]allergies can change[/i], and while that may not be true for all, it most certainly does happen. Children go from mildly allergic to deadly allergic...and no one understands why. One day a child is allergic and then down the line, they're not...It's just the mysterious nature of allergy. Many many kids outgrow wheat and egg, and a few do not. Peanut, I believe about 20% outgrow.
There are some things you know for sure. Your child [i]is[/i] allergic. Your child has a [i]history[/i] of reaction (excema, correct?). And now that you know that, you must avoid giving your child those things. You may also go one step further and find out the companies that label for 'may contain' items and avoid giving your DD those as well. Take it one day at a time, find some products that work for you, stick with them. Talk to your doctor more, bring a list of questions.
You're not alone!

Posted on: Sun, 01/13/2008 - 10:56pm
CatsMom's picture
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Joined: 01/09/2008 - 06:31

Thank you so much for the information. Dd has not - to my knowledge had a reaction to peanuts. I have offered her peanut butter (a staple in our house) various times, and she will not even try it. I gave her a peanut butter cracker once and she bit it and spit it out because it had peanut butter. When we found out she was allergic, it was an "aha" moment. I would guess (from reading symptoms) that maybe it makes her mouth tingle.
The other allergies (wheat and eggs) I am guessing (because she has eaten them most of her life) cause the eczema and sometimes (in the last 3 months or so) have had REALLY nasty diapers. I am also guessing that is part of her reaction - I would say to wheat and not eggs based on what she has consumed this week.
I try real hard to make sure she is safe, but I also want her to be healthy and since having her blood tests done (over a month ago) her appetite has decreased quite a bit. Even more so since the scratch test and I have changed her diet as much as possible.
I hope she will get hungry and just start eating the new stuff and not think about other foods.
Anyway, again, thank you for your information. I have a call into her ped. who is supposed to call me back today to see if he can give me some insight that the Allergist didn't.

Posted on: Sun, 01/13/2008 - 11:32pm
syzygy's picture
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Joined: 08/30/2007 - 09:00

My son had SPT done at 15 months. For reference, control meastured 4+, then the following results came back: milk (2+), egg yolk (2+), egg white (3+), and peanut (3+). We suspected the milk and egg (eczema from the milk, hives from the egg white), but he'd never eaten peanut/peanut products before so that was a surprise. Our allergist gave us an epipen script and suggested we rid our home of peanut products. I also stopped keeping egg in the house because the egg white was also a stronger allergy, but I kept dairy in the house (he's outgrown his milk allergy since, and I suspect he's outgrown his egg yolk allergy too).

Posted on: Sun, 01/13/2008 - 11:47pm
MommyOfTwo's picture
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Joined: 11/08/2007 - 09:44

I don't think you are being selfish at all! It is all about comfort level. I keep all pn/tn out of the house and sometimes I feel bad for my non-pa DS. I can't imagine having to deal with multiple FA and I certainly applaud all those that have to deal with it. I can't be easy!
I do have a question though that maybe someone who is reading this might be able to answer. I thought typically on the SPT that anything above a 4+ was considered positive. Is that not correct?
I had my DS SPT and he had lots of things that were 1-2 and things like dust mites were 3+ but the only thing they said he was positive for was pn which was a 9+ wheal. Since his dust mites were on the higher side but not technically a positive I just watch his skin and if he is having flare ups and I'm SURE I haven't eaten any pn(I still BF) and I'm SURE he hasn't had anything then I just go on a mad cleaning spree!LOL!
Is what is considered positive (via SPT) different for different allergist?

Posted on: Mon, 01/14/2008 - 12:19am
syzygy's picture
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Joined: 08/30/2007 - 09:00

In my son's case anything that generated a wheal was considered a positive allergic reaction. The control wheal was the benchmark that the other wheals were compared to and was assigned "4+". My assumption is isn't often expected that a reaction to an allergen will be stronger than a reaction to the control. They didn't measure my son's wheals in millimeters, but based on posts by others it sounds like some allergists do.

Posted on: Mon, 01/14/2008 - 9:35am
lakeswimr's picture
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Joined: 02/01/2007 - 09:00

There is no right or wrong but life is easier when I dont' have my son's food allergens in the house. If you are going to keep food allergens in your house you have to have a very dillegent system to keep your daughter from ingesting or coming into contact with these allergens.
Test results do not tell us the severity of a potential reaction. Reactions can and *do* vary from mild to life-threatening from exposure to exposure and if you are allergic you should avoid 100% and treat the allergy as potentially life-threatening. All IgE mediated food allergies can be life threatening, unfortunately. There is no way to test to see if the worst she will have is eczema or if she might have a life-threatening reaction so caution is best.
Many people continue to use their children's allergens in their homes. I don't . There isn't a right or wrong but children can have reactions to minute amounts. You should make sure there is no food residue on your cooking utensils, cups, plates, no crumbs on the table or floor. Also, some who are allergic to eggs react to it cooking and when you open a new bag of flour it gets into the air and can cause anaphylaxis so be careful when doiing that!
Best wishes!

Posted on: Mon, 01/14/2008 - 9:37am
lakeswimr's picture
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Joined: 02/01/2007 - 09:00

Also, you might want to check out [url="http://www.kidswithfoodallergies.org"]http://www.kidswithfoodallergies.org[/url]
They have a great recipe data base and there are many there who have the same food allergies and can give you lots of food ideas. :)

Posted on: Mon, 01/14/2008 - 11:02am
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Joined: 10/11/2006 - 09:00

As most have said, there is no "right or wrong". You are not being selfish, you are asking questions which is exactly how you, and we, all learn.
My dd is PA, TNA, SFA, Pork, EA and fish allergic. Her reactions to each of these has been different and based on those reaction histories we decide what we may or may not have in the house.
For instance, absolutly no egg, including things like mayo and ranch dressing, etc, not even in the house. She has had mouth and throat reactions to egg, plus severe contact reactions.
Tree nuts, we don't even recall a time she was exposed let alone reacted, so while we believe in the possibility based on her reactive history to other allergens, we do allow some things in our home. She of course may not eat them or touch them but they are around. She does eat some things that are "manufactured in the same facility", but that is our rule at home. Might I also add that as far as the actual allergen containing food,we do use caution when eating them or where they are even kept, but none the less, they are there.
Those are just two examples of her allergies, each one is different. Her allergist actually thinks she may have a better chance of outgrowing her peanut allergy than her egg allergy. Time will tell.
One more thing, what you do at home is your business, but when your child is out of your home it may become someone elses. We are more laid back at home. Once she leaves our home there is a "no tolerance" rule for all of her allergens. Anyone who watches her know she may not even be around any of those allergens. I provide food and snacks and drink for her. Only my immediate family really knows that we are more laid back at home.
This is what works for us. Everyone has to find their groove!
And believe me I know it's hard because my daughter first tested positive for wheat, egg and dairy and those are almost impossible odds, luckily she has already out grown wheat and dairy!
Kara

Posted on: Tue, 01/15/2008 - 1:00am
CatsMom's picture
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Joined: 01/09/2008 - 06:31

How old was your daughter when she outgrew her allergies? I pray that Cathryn will outgrow some of her allergies.

Posted on: Tue, 01/15/2008 - 5:51am
KaraLH's picture
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Joined: 10/11/2006 - 09:00

she was diagnosed at 2 1/2 and in just a short time of strict avoidance she out grew them along with outgrowing beef and chicken, turkey and orange. The dr. pointed out that her allergies to these things seemed very slight but we avoided and she hasn't reacted again! she still has problems just drinking staight milk- more of an intolerance so per her allergists orders she drinks soymilk. I used to cook completey with soy and use soy cheese etc., but now she tolerates things made with milk products better. Of course she still has a slew of other allergies yet that she hasn't yet outgrown. She will be 4 in two months.
kara

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