no longer epi-pen jr virgin

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Yesterday, my 22 mos old son took a sip of his friend's sippy cup of milk. Granted he did not eat peanuts (which he is also allergic), but same violent reactions. I saw him take the milk and immediately gave him benedryl. He doesn't talk well but I could tell he was not alright. He immediately had violent vomiting. I couldn't tell how his breathing was. Then the hives started on his chest. While on the phone with the allergist nurse, I used his epi-pen and called 911. Within a few minutes the hives started to go down and he was playing when the medics arrived. His vitals were normal but the allergist said to take him to the ER for observation. He was fine immediately after the pen injection. I was a wreck. He was playing with the medics and toy trucks! I felt his reaction was "a grey area" and hestitated to give him the pen. I have used the trainer and know what to look for, but I was so scared. I held the pen in for 12-15 seconds. The pen scared him more than his reaction. Why did I hesitate? Maybe I was in denial how serious it was. I consider this a learning experience and I am confident that the pen works, I can give it to him, and he will respond well to the pen. I nipped his reaction in the bud. My allergist supported me and told me how proud she was of me to think straight and stay focused (although I was a wreck!) Thank you to everyone for your knowledge, insight and support. Susan

On Sep 11, 1999

Susan, So glad to hear that everything went fine. I had a similar incident happen recently with eggs and the reactions were a bit milder but I was just tormented about whether or not to use the epi (I didn't at that time). Relaying your experience helps. I gathered from your post that this was due to a milk ingestion and your son also has a milk allergy? Christine

On Sep 11, 1999

Hi Susan,

Thanks so much for posting your experience. I think we all need to be reminded how important the epi is in a reaction, and we need the assurance from you guys who have had to administer it. Did your son cry a lot after you administered it? I was just wondering how painful the injection is.

Stay Safe, Debbie

On Sep 11, 1999

Debbie and Christine:

Alex is allergic to eggs, wheat, milk, peanuts, and lamb. He has never eaten eggs or peanuts, but was skin tested. Until Thursday, he never drank milk! Foam from a latte on his cheek gives him hives.

The funny thing about the pen is I didn't realize it was a needle! Hello! I have carried this for a year and never thought about it! Alex cried from the shot and bled a little. You can still see the dot. I gave the pen to the nurse for proper disposal in a sharpers container because it had a long needle.

On Sep 12, 1999

Debbie,

My daughter was between 2-3 years old the first time I had to actually give her the shot myself. Like Susan K's son, she was more scared of the shot than what was happening from the reaction. She cried more at the idea of getting the shot than when I actually gave it to her. I sat her on the bathroom counter so that I could control her leg movements and then pressed it into her thigh until I heard the click. She immediately jerked away and the needle came out (yes, it is long!). I instinctively just shoved it right back into her leg; this time she did't move away. I don't know if it was the sound of the CLICK or the thought of the shot or pain that made her jerk away. I do know though that the next time she had a reaction she BEGGED me to give her the shot. She knew that it made her feel better. She still dreads the idea of a shot, but she knows it can save her life.

[This message has been edited by KWest (edited September 12, 1999).]

On Sep 12, 1999

Thanks so much everyone for posting your experiences. I had a horrible nightmare the other night that Matthew had a reaction and I completely messed up on administering the epi 3 different times! I think this must have been a pent up fear coming to the surface. Thanks again.

On Sep 15, 1999

I used the Epi for the first time today! Joshua had hives and his face and ears got bright red. I hesitated to give it, and now feel terrible that I hesitated, but after 3 hrs at the ER, he is fine. He cried for about 5 mins after the shot, and I too, was very surprised at the length of the needle! I'm still not sure if the reaction was peanut or egg related. I made the mistake of giving in to him about Spaghettios. His brother was eating them and I let Josh have some. I will NEVER do that again!! His sister had an egg for breakfast, so it could have been something that I missed cleaning up? I'm usually very thorough...I just don't know. We are going to his dr tomorrow for a follow up, and I feel like I won't calm down until then!! Sorry so long - thanks for reading!

On Sep 16, 1999

Hi Dawn,

I am so glad to hear Joshua is okay. The probable source of his reaction is going to drive you crazy but you did the right thing in administering his Epi Pen.

All I kept thinking was "I just killed my own child" when I accidently swapped my children's plates and gave my son his sister's PB&J sandwich and gave her his Jelly sandwich. I called 911 and my husband administered the Epi Pen. I know exactly what you went through and are still going through. It will take a while to get [b]your[/b] system back to normal! [img]http://client.ibboards.com/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]

I hope all goes well with your follow up appointment and make sure the Doctor gives you a new prescription for another Epi Pen to replace the one you used.

P.S. To Susan--how is everything going since you had to administer the Epi? How are you feeling now?

Stay safe.

[This message has been edited by Connie (edited September 16, 1999).]

On Sep 16, 1999

Connie:

Thank you for your thoughts. It was a week ago that I gave Alex the epi-pen. It is still fresh in my mind. He is great. I am still a little "on edge", but with his allergies I go between thinking "it's not fair" to "thank God he is healthy and happy"

I have called my local fire department to make sure they care an epi-pen if Alex was seperated from the pen. You may recall the Washington girl that died last year because the local medics didn't carry the epi. The state gov't is trying to change the rules. I am also going to get Alex a medic alert braclet.

All in all, it was a scary learning experience.

On Sep 23, 1999

Hi Susan, Thanks for the post. I also had my child take a sip of milk and broke out with hives and was grabbing his neck. I gave him benedrayl as soon as I saw him take a sip and hesitated about giving him the EPI-PEN. He ended up clearing up after 10 minutes but I think now I really should of used the EPI-PEN. Next time I won't be so scared. Thanks again.

On Apr 14, 2003

raising for Batrice

On Apr 15, 2003

thank you. is the epipen jr needle very long or just the regular? i was wondering besides the dose if there is a difference?

------------------ mommy to gabriel 11-25-02 who is allergic to peanuts, tree nuts, and shellfish

step mom to: isaiah 06-18-96 rebekah 09-13-97

expecting another son by july 13, 2003

On Apr 21, 2003

The needles are long in both the regular and the junior pens.

If you've never had to discharge the epi-pen on a real, live person, then save your expired pens and practice on a grapefruit or orange. Last summer we had four pens expire around the same time, and we travelled to both sets of grandparents with them and let them practice with them on a piece of fruit. We did the same for the neighborhood teenage babysitter. It really did a lot for our anxiety and unanswered questions.

On Apr 22, 2003

Ya'll are making me nervous...

I just shot an expired Epi-pen into an orange (put a hole right through it! Good thing I am practicing!) and did not think the needle was that long. Less than an inch definitely. Did my whole needle come out? Or did I permanently implant the thing in the orange? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/eek.gif[/img]

Carolyn

On Apr 22, 2003

No, Carolyn. That sounds about right. It just seemed so long at the time because I stuck it into my 21 month old baby's little leg.

On May 23, 2003

What a great idea! My pens expire in August - I will have to try testing them out on fruit.

Quote:

Originally posted by teacher: [b]The needles are long in both the regular and the junior pens.

If you've never had to discharge the epi-pen on a real, live person, then save your expired pens and practice on a grapefruit or orange. Last summer we had four pens expire around the same time, and we travelled to both sets of grandparents with them and let them practice with them on a piece of fruit. We did the same for the neighborhood teenage babysitter. It really did a lot for our anxiety and unanswered questions.[/b]

On May 23, 2003

How long is the needle? I thought it was like an inch or so. Is it longer than that?

Quote:

Originally posted by tcperrine: [b]Ya'll are making me nervous...

I just shot an expired Epi-pen into an orange (put a hole right through it! Good thing I am practicing!) and did not think the needle was that long. Less than an inch definitely. Did my whole needle come out? Or did I permanently implant the thing in the orange? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/eek.gif[/img]

Carolyn[/b]

On May 29, 2003

I think it is about an inch. Must admit that most times I've used it I've not been in much of a state to care about needle size though!!

It hurts a little bit afterwards, but because the needle is sprung loaded (sorry to make that sound so vicious!) it goes in really quickly so it's over before you notice! (Remember to hold it in though). Also, the powerful spring means it can be used through clothing in an emergency. I've used mine through thick jeans before and it works just fine. I've heard it can even be used through diving wet suits, although I've never tried this out!!

Louise.xx

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