Newbie with birthday party coming up

Posted on: Wed, 11/14/2007 - 2:44am
gatorgrrl's picture
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Joined: 11/14/2007 - 09:21

We just found out last week that my 2yo DS has a peanut allergy. I'm completely overwhelmed trying to learn everything about the allergy, eliminate anything nut-related in our house, and let family/friends know what's going on and what they need to do.

So...we also have a birthday party coming up this weekend. I've heard over and over about the dangers of baked goods, but am wondering what specifically is the problem with mixes, cookies, etc.? We'll be bringing safe treats for him anyway, but what do I need to watch out for? Help!

Posted on: Wed, 11/14/2007 - 3:59am
Marcela's picture
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Joined: 11/09/2007 - 00:13

I'm new at this, too. I've known for about a week about Sofia's PA. From the research I've done I think the dangers with baked goods is even though they don't contain peanuts, they may have been produced/baked on the same equipment as baked goods that do contain peanuts, thus the risk contamination. Individuals with PA can have a reaction with even a trace amount of peanut, thus the danger.
We have a birthday party on Friday and I plan to bake cupcakes to take with us. I have no idea how allergic Sofia is and if she would react to such small amounts, but I don't want to take any chances. She got a 5 and a 6 on her RAST tests, so I'm just assuming she is severely allergic to any amount.

Posted on: Wed, 11/14/2007 - 11:44pm
mcmom's picture
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Joined: 06/15/2004 - 09:00

As the poster above said, any baked item can be cross contaminated. I would never allow my PA son to eat anything from a bakery. Further, I wouldn't allow him to eat something another person baked - you have no way of knowing if they just made a pb sandwich on their counter, if they used that cookie sheet for pb cookies, etc. Even a trace amount of residue can cause a major reaction.
There are definitely safe mixes for cakes/cupcakes - if you are dealing with PA/TNA only, Betty Crocker mixes and frostings are safe to use. I would just recommend using them [b]yourself[/b], KWIM?
I've been doing this since my son was one - he's now eight, and has never had a reaction since we found out about his PA. When we go to a birthday party, I bring him his own safe cupcake to eat. [b]Even if it is at a family members house[/b], I either bring him his own, or I bring the entire dessert. You can bake a batch of cupcakes and freeze them - wrap each one, then put them in a freezer bag. When you need one, pull one out and frost it, they defrost quickly.
The best advice I can give you re: parties and bringing his own treat - he's young, don't make a big deal out of it. Never make an exception. Make sure his cupcake looks yummy, and he won't mind as much about having something different - it's important to teach him right away that he will always have something different/special/his own. As he gets older, this will not be such a big deal, trust me. My son loves my cupcakes (I bake *everything*, lol!) and he is very matter of fact about it at this point. He is also extremely responsible about his allergy, which I credit with instilling rules in him from day one.
Good luck, and ask lots of questions here, you'll learn everything you need to know :)

Posted on: Thu, 11/15/2007 - 12:07am
maphiemom's picture
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Joined: 12/01/2005 - 09:00

Originally Posted By: mcmomAs the poster above said, any baked item can be cross contaminated. I would never allow my PA son to eat anything from a bakery. Further, I wouldn't allow him to eat something another person baked - you have no way of knowing if they just made a pb sandwich on their counter, if they used that cookie sheet for pb cookies, etc. Even a trace amount of residue can cause a major reaction.
There are definitely safe mixes for cakes/cupcakes - if you are dealing with PA/TNA only, Betty Crocker mixes and frostings are safe to use. I would just recommend using them [b]yourself[/b], KWIM?
I've been doing this since my son was one - he's now eight, and has never had a reaction since we found out about his PA. When we go to a birthday party, I bring him his own safe cupcake to eat. [b]Even if it is at a family members house[/b], I either bring him his own, or I bring the entire dessert. You can bake a batch of cupcakes and freeze them - wrap each one, then put them in a freezer bag. When you need one, pull one out and frost it, they defrost quickly.
The best advice I can give you re: parties and bringing his own treat - he's young, don't make a big deal out of it. Never make an exception. Make sure his cupcake looks yummy, and he won't mind as much about having something different - it's important to teach him right away that he will always have something different/special/his own. As he gets older, this will not be such a big deal, trust me. My son loves my cupcakes (I bake *everything*, lol!) and he is very matter of fact about it at this point. He is also extremely responsible about his allergy, which I credit with instilling rules in him from day one.
Good luck, and ask lots of questions here, you'll learn everything you need to know :)
This is definately the way to go, I once trusted a bakery was peanut/nut free as they claimed , big mistake , they obviously had trace amounts of nuts/peanuts. Caused reaction #3.
Our school sells baked goods on Fridays for fundraising , I am an extra baker as I provide the school with 12 or so peanut /nut free baked items to be for those who are allergic on those days, and are sold in a completely different area.
I think the baking cupcakes and freezing them is a perfect solution. I have also used Betty Crocker without any reactions ever, I feel it is very safe.
One more thing look out for ice cream , another problem food, just because it is not a peanut containing flavour doesn't mean its safe, very bad for trace amounts.

Posted on: Thu, 11/15/2007 - 11:50am
gatorgrrl's picture
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Joined: 11/14/2007 - 09:21

Thanks so much for your responses!!! It's such a relief to have a place to go with all these questions.

Posted on: Mon, 12/10/2007 - 12:50pm
LDR's picture
LDR
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Joined: 09/28/2001 - 09:00

Another thing to be aware of at birthday parties: Lots of parents are around who want to help out, and they will offer food to your child. At that young age, you'll have to stay very close by. We also always bring our own food and treats. I call the parent to find out what food is being served, and try to bring the same food for my daughter. If it's pizza, I just call the pizza place in advance. Everyone says how easy it is to freeze cupcakes, but I found that a bit stressful to have to have a stash of cupcakes on hand. We offer some other safe treat, I may bake something or give her a safe store bought treat. You also want to be aware of goody bags, which often have candy in them.

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