newbie here

Posted on: Sun, 06/19/2005 - 6:25am
mommasteph's picture
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Joined: 06/19/2005 - 09:00

i wanted to say hi and say iam glad i found this site

Posted on: Thu, 03/09/2006 - 3:17am
amartin's picture
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Joined: 02/22/2006 - 09:00

Welcome Stephanie!
My name is Ann and I have a 17 month old son with a severe peanut allergy. He was diagnosed just a few weeks ago, so I am relatively new to this world too.

Posted on: Thu, 03/09/2006 - 10:08am
LookingOut's picture
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Joined: 03/08/2006 - 09:00

Thanks for the welcome Ann. I wish you the very best on this journey. From what I've gathered, when you find out at the younger ages there is a better chance of outgrowing the PA provided you can prevent further exposure. Godspeed to ya!
Stephanie

Posted on: Thu, 03/09/2006 - 10:11pm
BensMum's picture
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Joined: 03/09/2006 - 09:00

Is that true about there being some chance it can be outgrown?

Posted on: Fri, 03/10/2006 - 2:35am
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Joined: 02/26/2006 - 09:00

our allergy dr says that there is a 20 % chance of out growing a pa. 60 % for dairy

Posted on: Fri, 03/10/2006 - 5:58am
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Joined: 10/28/2005 - 09:00

our allergist and a recent study said that if your child is under 4 and has an IGE level <5, they have a 50% chance of outgrowing. I'll take 1 out of 2 over 1 out of 5!!! It's still not likely I guess, but I definitely have hope! My son is 20 months olds and when diagnosed at 16 months his level was .83. We are doing everything in our limited power to not expose him to nuts AT ALL in hopes that he'll outgrow it.

Posted on: Fri, 03/10/2006 - 6:38am
patsmommy's picture
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Joined: 10/31/2001 - 09:00

Welcome Stephanie I have a 8 yr old Pa/ta son and 2 other kids, one 5 who we do not tink is allergic to peanuts and tree nuts due to a negative rast and one who is only 3, no testing yet.

Posted on: Mon, 03/13/2006 - 1:32am
amartin's picture
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Joined: 02/22/2006 - 09:00

According to our allergist and the research I have read, statistically there is a 20% chance to outgrow a peanut allergy. I have also heard that if your RAST for peanut specific ige is less than 5 than you have a 50% chance. However, my son's RAST at 16 months was 42. I was told that miracles do happen, and technically he still has a 20% chance to outgrow, but not to count on it. Personally, I do believe in miracles :> ).

Posted on: Mon, 03/13/2006 - 6:24am
SkyMom's picture
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Joined: 10/27/2001 - 09:00

Hi and welcome to the boards. I have always found this site very informative and the people very willing to help. My dd was diagnosed at ten months with over .100+ on the rast. We have remained contact free for seven years, she will be eight in April. When we re-tested her a year ago she still remained over 100 so unfortunately I don't agree that you will outgrow the allergy with no exposure. I have read that under 10 there is a high chance to outgrow it but that over 10 it was highly unlikely. I'm sorry I don't mean to be the dark cloud but that is just what I have been told by our allergist and read in various articles.

Posted on: Tue, 04/04/2006 - 1:40pm
kylaC's picture
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Joined: 02/02/1999 - 09:00

Hi,
I'm in my 30s and have been tested 3 times in my life...the most recent about 10 years ago. No change. I am PA and TNA. My current and previous allergists both said that this is a lifelong thing.
I can imagine that it's difficult being a parent, but take heart that many of us have survived well into adulthood. It is definitely doable and there are great benefits like:
* A great excuse to not kiss a boy you don't really like that much -- "I don't know if what you ate today is safe for me."
* Specially-made dinners at functions like weddings, company dinners, etc. because the buffet or event meal is "risky" (I have had so many people tell me they were going to tell people they had a peanut and tree nut allergy next time so they'd get a good dinner and not rubbery chicken)
* A built-in "diet". When you are scared to eat out, you tend not to eat as unhealthily.
* An interesting story to tell. Really, there still are so many people who just can't believe that a fraction of a peanut can kill someone.
* An acceptable excuse not to eat something you don't really want to, like Aunt Betty's exotic casserole -- "No, thanks. It might have peanuts or nuts in it. I don't want to risk it." [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]
My biggest life-saving tips:
* Never ever eat any food with your hands without washing your hands.
* Never ever eat any food unless you feel comfortable that it really is safe...even if it means saying no to Grandma, an aunt, or a best friend. Go with that "spidey-sense".
* Alway read labels before you eat something, even if you've eaten it before. Things might have changed.
* Get over being cool and embrace that you are different...and that's ok. Nothing is more important than living.
* Don't make a big deal about it. Take care of yourself as much as possible by eating and/or bringing your own food. People respect that, but they don't respect people who "demand" you change everything to keep them safe. It's not up to everyone else to keep you safe all the time; you have to keep yourself safe.
Kyla

Posted on: Tue, 04/04/2006 - 9:37pm
Gilli011's picture
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Joined: 12/05/2004 - 09:00

Kyla,
As a parent of two girls with pa/tna (still waiting to find out about our baby boy...)I always appreciate hearing from adults who have lived this, a few more adults here have eased my mind on several occasions. I think I will print your post for a later time when my girls can get the benefits of your experience and your great sense of humor! Thanks.
Cheers, Gilli

Posted on: Wed, 04/05/2006 - 3:05am
amartin's picture
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Joined: 02/22/2006 - 09:00

I second Gilli, Kyla! Thank you for your post! As a parent, it really is great to read this...

Posted on: Thu, 03/09/2006 - 3:17am
amartin's picture
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Joined: 02/22/2006 - 09:00

Welcome Stephanie!
My name is Ann and I have a 17 month old son with a severe peanut allergy. He was diagnosed just a few weeks ago, so I am relatively new to this world too.

Posted on: Thu, 03/09/2006 - 10:08am
LookingOut's picture
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Joined: 03/08/2006 - 09:00

Thanks for the welcome Ann. I wish you the very best on this journey. From what I've gathered, when you find out at the younger ages there is a better chance of outgrowing the PA provided you can prevent further exposure. Godspeed to ya!
Stephanie

Posted on: Thu, 03/09/2006 - 10:11pm
BensMum's picture
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Joined: 03/09/2006 - 09:00

Is that true about there being some chance it can be outgrown?

Posted on: Fri, 03/10/2006 - 2:35am
smudgesgarden's picture
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Joined: 02/26/2006 - 09:00

our allergy dr says that there is a 20 % chance of out growing a pa. 60 % for dairy

Posted on: Fri, 03/10/2006 - 5:58am
nomorenutz's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/28/2005 - 09:00

our allergist and a recent study said that if your child is under 4 and has an IGE level <5, they have a 50% chance of outgrowing. I'll take 1 out of 2 over 1 out of 5!!! It's still not likely I guess, but I definitely have hope! My son is 20 months olds and when diagnosed at 16 months his level was .83. We are doing everything in our limited power to not expose him to nuts AT ALL in hopes that he'll outgrow it.

Posted on: Fri, 03/10/2006 - 6:38am
patsmommy's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/31/2001 - 09:00

Welcome Stephanie I have a 8 yr old Pa/ta son and 2 other kids, one 5 who we do not tink is allergic to peanuts and tree nuts due to a negative rast and one who is only 3, no testing yet.

Posted on: Mon, 03/13/2006 - 1:32am
amartin's picture
Offline
Joined: 02/22/2006 - 09:00

According to our allergist and the research I have read, statistically there is a 20% chance to outgrow a peanut allergy. I have also heard that if your RAST for peanut specific ige is less than 5 than you have a 50% chance. However, my son's RAST at 16 months was 42. I was told that miracles do happen, and technically he still has a 20% chance to outgrow, but not to count on it. Personally, I do believe in miracles :> ).

Posted on: Mon, 03/13/2006 - 6:24am
SkyMom's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/27/2001 - 09:00

Hi and welcome to the boards. I have always found this site very informative and the people very willing to help. My dd was diagnosed at ten months with over .100+ on the rast. We have remained contact free for seven years, she will be eight in April. When we re-tested her a year ago she still remained over 100 so unfortunately I don't agree that you will outgrow the allergy with no exposure. I have read that under 10 there is a high chance to outgrow it but that over 10 it was highly unlikely. I'm sorry I don't mean to be the dark cloud but that is just what I have been told by our allergist and read in various articles.

Posted on: Tue, 04/04/2006 - 1:40pm
kylaC's picture
Offline
Joined: 02/02/1999 - 09:00

Hi,
I'm in my 30s and have been tested 3 times in my life...the most recent about 10 years ago. No change. I am PA and TNA. My current and previous allergists both said that this is a lifelong thing.
I can imagine that it's difficult being a parent, but take heart that many of us have survived well into adulthood. It is definitely doable and there are great benefits like:
* A great excuse to not kiss a boy you don't really like that much -- "I don't know if what you ate today is safe for me."
* Specially-made dinners at functions like weddings, company dinners, etc. because the buffet or event meal is "risky" (I have had so many people tell me they were going to tell people they had a peanut and tree nut allergy next time so they'd get a good dinner and not rubbery chicken)
* A built-in "diet". When you are scared to eat out, you tend not to eat as unhealthily.
* An interesting story to tell. Really, there still are so many people who just can't believe that a fraction of a peanut can kill someone.
* An acceptable excuse not to eat something you don't really want to, like Aunt Betty's exotic casserole -- "No, thanks. It might have peanuts or nuts in it. I don't want to risk it." [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]
My biggest life-saving tips:
* Never ever eat any food with your hands without washing your hands.
* Never ever eat any food unless you feel comfortable that it really is safe...even if it means saying no to Grandma, an aunt, or a best friend. Go with that "spidey-sense".
* Alway read labels before you eat something, even if you've eaten it before. Things might have changed.
* Get over being cool and embrace that you are different...and that's ok. Nothing is more important than living.
* Don't make a big deal about it. Take care of yourself as much as possible by eating and/or bringing your own food. People respect that, but they don't respect people who "demand" you change everything to keep them safe. It's not up to everyone else to keep you safe all the time; you have to keep yourself safe.
Kyla

Posted on: Tue, 04/04/2006 - 9:37pm
Gilli011's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/05/2004 - 09:00

Kyla,
As a parent of two girls with pa/tna (still waiting to find out about our baby boy...)I always appreciate hearing from adults who have lived this, a few more adults here have eased my mind on several occasions. I think I will print your post for a later time when my girls can get the benefits of your experience and your great sense of humor! Thanks.
Cheers, Gilli

Posted on: Wed, 04/05/2006 - 3:05am
amartin's picture
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Joined: 02/22/2006 - 09:00

I second Gilli, Kyla! Thank you for your post! As a parent, it really is great to read this...

Posted on: Thu, 04/02/2009 - 11:21pm
Food Allergy Assistant's picture
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Joined: 03/04/2009 - 07:15

Hi Crystal,
You'll find lots of support and resources on-line. My 8 year old has dairy, egg, peanut and tree nut allergies. I have a website at www.foodallergyassistant.com. Feel free to visit and check out recipes and resources. From the site, you can jump to my blog which lists many other blogs and sites you'll find helpful.
My son has worn his Epi-pen around his waist to school since kindergarten. He knows not to eat anything unless the ingredients have been checked. As a result of his allergies, I believe our family is healthier because we make so much from scratch and we're very aware of what we eat.
Good luck to you!

Posted on: Thu, 05/05/2011 - 5:01am
Samantha418's picture
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Joined: 04/11/2011 - 12:44

Hi there! I am 22 years old, and have had a severe peanut allergy my entire life. Schooling was definitely tough, and I have some stories that would make you wary of public school, yet I still encourage you to go through with it. Dealing with my allergy at a young age and being forced to stand up for myself has made me who I am today. I learned at a very young age that I need to stand up for myself in order to keep myself safe and healthy. I have gone into shock when I was three, and then last year, and have had many serious reactions along the way, but I have learned through my experiences how to be a stronger person. I have a loving family who has always watched out for me, and a boyfriend of two years now who gave up eating peanuts to keep me safe, so there are compasionate people out there, and your child will be sure to encounter them. Be strong, and despite your fears, your child will navigate their own path through this allergy. It will define them in ways unreachable by others without the allergy, and they will be a stronger person in the long run. Good luck, and if you have any questions or need advice, don't hesitate to ask!
-Samantha

Posted on: Thu, 05/05/2011 - 5:44am
PA Mommy's picture
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Joined: 04/05/2011 - 19:56

I think some districts are better than others. Go in and meet with the principals and teachers in your area schools. You might be pleasantly surprised by one. And even if the area is not School of Choice, I think you could get a variance given the severity of her condition.
My PA son is just turning three, so I'm a bit behind you yet, but I do have a friend with a son with severe TNA. He is in a public school that is nut-free. Even so, his mom sends "safe" treats for him to have at birthday celebrations and parties. His teachers do not allow him to have anything any other parent/student ever brought in. They are very careful, and give his mom some notice so she can supply items for holiday celebrations. It's worked well for her.
Now, the public school closest to me is not as supportive, so we have chosen a neighboring district with better allergy-handling policies for our family (school of choice). So they can't take the bus, but I'm pretty sure I do NOT want my PA boy on a bus, anyway, so I'm happy with the choice.
And there is always home schooling as an option if you really are unsure.

Posted on: Thu, 05/05/2011 - 5:48am
Jenbenito's picture
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Joined: 05/04/2011 - 20:18

Thanks so much to both of you for the encouragement. Like I said, I have no one to turned to about PA. So this is very helpful. And Samantha...thank you! My daughter wants to go to school SOO bad! I think I will set up some meetings with the school to be more prepared. She is such a strong little girl..at such a young age. I know she wont let this slow her down...so I shouldnt either! Honestly...thank you both!!

Posted on: Thu, 05/05/2011 - 5:53am
PA Mommy's picture
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Joined: 04/05/2011 - 19:56

:) We're all in this, together!
Samantha418s posts always make me feel better, too :)

Posted on: Thu, 05/05/2011 - 5:55am
Samantha418's picture
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Joined: 04/11/2011 - 12:44

Thanks ladies! You both remind me of my mom and how hard she tried to make me life safe for me when I was growing up. It's one thing to have the allergy, but its another to watch your baby grow up with it and worry every time they leave the house. I give you both SO much credit, and wish you a very happy mothers day! :)

Posted on: Thu, 05/05/2011 - 11:56pm
Samantha418's picture
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Joined: 04/11/2011 - 12:44

To Jenbenito and PAMommy, I would love to feature you both in my weekly stories section about families struggling with this allergy, or any kind of allergy. If you are interested in more details, please e-mail me at sbpeanutfree@gmail.com and I will tell you more! Thanks ladies :)

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