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Posted on: Tue, 04/02/2002 - 2:54am
sammismom's picture
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Joined: 04/02/2002 - 09:00

pHibr /
I am new to this site. My daughter is three years old and has a peanut allergy. She has only tried peanut butter twice. Both times it was a tiny amount, which she spat out. Within ten minutes she broke out in hives from head to toe. It was really frightening to us to see such a reaction, from such a tiny amount that she did not even swallow.br /
We took pictures of her to show our family doctor. He prescribed an epi-pen, one to carry with us at all times and one for at home. How do I go about having her tested to see how severe her allergy really is???br /
Now I am afraid to try any kind of nut product on her! Does it mean she is allergic to all nuts??? Should I try different ones on her. And yes I did consume peanut products while I was pregnant and breastfeeding.Something which I did not do during my second pregnancy./p

Posted on: Tue, 04/02/2002 - 8:09am
Corvallis Mom's picture
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Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

Welcome, Sammi's Mom. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] I am also the mother of a three year old daughter with PA (and other food allergies).
- Definitely consider your child's allergy severe. You can read through the thread in the main board about this... basically, this allergy is too unpredictable to ever be relied upon *not* to produce a severe reaction at some point. The fact you have been prescribed epinephrine is evidence that your physician is taking this as seriously as he/she should. Given your daughter's reaction history, your allergist may not see any reason to test her right now- she's already demonstrated a very convincing allergy, and that's all that matters right now... later you may want a "number" to show care providers or school officials.
- Talk to your allergist before introducing any of the "Major 8" to a child like yours! This includes Milk, Eggs, Wheat, Soy, Peanuts, Treenuts, Fish, and Shellfish. We have been advised to strictly avoid fish, all tree nuts, and shellfish AS LONG AS POSSIBLE- and we have no idea whether she is allergic to any of them. That's right- don't EVER introduce them if there isn't any need to.
Here's my own advice (worth absolutely what you're paying me for it [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] ):
Take a deep breath. Consider a medic-alert bracelet for your daughter- the younger they begin wearing one the better, especially if she is ever out of your care. Get into the habit of reading labels and calling manufacturers. Make the phrases "may contain" and "natural flavorings" and "modified food starch" register as red flags. Asian food? Consider it contaminated (look at it this way- you'll be wrong less than half the time). Collect information from your doctor, from FAAN, and from here to give to friends and family (they'll be utterly incredulous about a lot of what you tell them otherwise [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img] ). Expect some days to feel hopeless, but know that they almost always get better too.
If you are like me, you will find a lot of strength in reading messages from parents of young adults who are managing their own allergy now... these were once children just like ours!
Know that you can ask anything here and you can also tell us just about anything you need to. Again- Welcome. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Thu, 07/29/2010 - 4:48am
cervonil's picture
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Joined: 04/28/2010 - 12:30

Welcome, it is horribly scary! Did you have to take her to the ER, or did you give her Benadryl? I got some books from the library for me and my parents to read. Also joined a local support group - which has been wonderful.

Posted on: Fri, 07/30/2010 - 12:41am
kruegert's picture
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Joined: 07/28/2010 - 15:22

I brought her to the ER. I'm a Pharmacist and I didn't even have any Benadryl at my house (which was very embarrassing to admit to the MD at the ER!!)

Posted on: Fri, 07/30/2010 - 4:15am
BestAllergySites's picture
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Joined: 03/15/2009 - 21:46

Welcome to peanutallergy.com! I'm sorry to hear of your daughters reaction. I know how scary that can be.
This site has a wealth of information and never be afraid to ask any questions.
Always keep your EpiPen on hand and obviously avoid peanut products. It does get easier in time.
Good luck!

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