New to Group

Posted on: Mon, 03/26/2001 - 4:15am
Rob C's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/03/2001 - 09:00

pHello, I just wanted to introduce myself. I am the father of a 5 year old boy, Ryan, who is anaphylactically allergic to Peanuts and Tree Nuts. He also has had asthma and up until this winter chronic bronchitis. My wife is also a new member. She goes by Laura C. She's a Registered Nurse and I'm fairly PC literate so hopefully bewteen us we can be an asset to this group, while also learning from all here./p
pRob/p

Posted on: Mon, 03/26/2001 - 5:43am
anonymous's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Hi Rob and welcome. My husband also scans the boards occasionally and finds it to be a great help. His main interest lies in the research area - when will the cure be available!
I wouldn't be surprised to see a new user name soon... "Cayley's Dad" has his own ideas and opinions to share (just no time to do it!). He'll be glad to see another dad actively involved with the board.
Cayley will be 4 years old in July - her dad is amazing about the PA. He "gets" it, he doesn't hesitate to educate others who don't "get" it and he'll go to any lengths to keep his daughter safe.
Most dads are like this, off the boards, but I'm glad you will be posting with your concerns and help. It's good to get the male parent perspective, and you're right, we moms do seem to outnumber you dads, in terms of posting (I read another of your posts in which you recognized the large number of women posting)!
Again, welcome! We (Cayley's Dad, in particular) look forward to reading your posts!

Posted on: Mon, 03/26/2001 - 6:16am
Rob C's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/03/2001 - 09:00

Cayley's Mom - Thanks for the welcome. I was unsure if I should reply to Mir's problem with her in-laws. I was reading one of those jokes about what the differences are between men and women the other day and something struck me that it may actually be true. It said that when Women complain about something they ofen want someone to empathize with them, not give them an immediate solution. My reaction, after reading the problems was like well just don't bring the child to the in-laws. Is that insensitive to say? I'd like to hear reactions from other women. Can I just blurt out what I feel is a solution to a problem or am I going to end up making people upset (last thing I want to do)?

Posted on: Mon, 03/26/2001 - 6:52am
anonymous's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Rob - I hope more women will give you feedback, but in the meantime, I have to laugh...
I often tease my opinionated husband, that if he registered as "Cayley's Dad" I could just see "Cayley's Mom" responding after his posts saying "Sorry! He didn't really mean that!!".
Seriously though, I think it's great to have the father's perspective. Women DO want solutions to their problems, but sometimes they just want recognition also, that it is a difficult situation to be in. Hence, the empathy.
I wouldn't worry about offending anyone. We do have other fathers posting occasionally, and to tell you the truth, they get away with bluntness that we mothers wouldn't! Just like real life... *sigh*...
Looking forward to reading your perspective on things. Go for it!

Posted on: Fri, 02/14/2003 - 3:06am
cynde's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/10/2002 - 09:00

Welcome milldill, glad you're getting the info you need. Sorry to hear about all the allergies your DD has and the asthma. Our DS has lots of food allergies and environmental (including dust mites) allergies too, it's not fun. We are in the lower mainland of BC, close to WW.
------------------
Cynde

Posted on: Fri, 02/14/2003 - 7:49am
river's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/15/1999 - 09:00

Welcome milldill! I know that this site has been invaluable to me. I'm looking forward to reading your posts.

Posted on: Sat, 03/18/2006 - 11:40am
Daisy's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/16/2006 - 09:00

So sorry for the news about your son. You must be a bit like, "What next?"
I can only offer you support. But this site offers lots of ideas, school info and information that would be difficult to find, otherwise. I have learned more here in a couple of months than I have in the 12 years since my diagnosis.
Do you have a 504 plan for your daughter? Have you checked to see if there is a support group in your area? The school [i]should[/i] be in charge of monitoring the snacks other parents send in, but unfortunately it seems to fall on the parents of the allergic child.
Daisy

Posted on: Sun, 03/19/2006 - 11:53pm
Gilli011's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/05/2004 - 09:00

Hi there,
In the last year we have found out that both of our daughters are pa/tna. I was just coming to terms with the first one (youngest dd - 2 at the time) when we found out that our oldest dd was pa (5yrs). We found this out 2 weeks before she started kindergarden. I was not prepared to send a pa child off to school, but fortunately the school system here is used to this and is proactive. I also have a 7 month old and was recently told by the pediatrician that it is very likely that he will have pa. I don't think it will bother me quite as much the third time around....it could be worse right?
Cheers, Gilli

Posted on: Thu, 03/23/2006 - 2:30pm
kylaC's picture
Offline
Joined: 02/02/1999 - 09:00

Hi there,
To make you feel better, I'm PA and TNA and in my 30s. I survived not only going to schools that were not peanut-free, but my home was not peanut-free. Far less was known back then and our family doctor didn't really make it clear that I could die from this. So, my Dad and brother used to eat peanut butter sandwiches, peanuts and mixed nuts were sometimes snacked on. Scary, huh? They were extremely careful, obviously, since I never had a reaction. I used to go to friends' homes for birthdays and sleepovers and I know their homes weren't "wiped clean". Somehow, I never had a reaction. I always told people I couldn't eat peanuts/nuts at all and that was enough. But I grew up in Canada and peanuts, nuts, peanut butter just weren't as popular there as in the U.S. If I was ever around someone with a peanut butter sandwich, it smelled really bad to me and I just moved away from the area.
So, take heart. I survived and continue to survive -- having had only one minor reaction in my life so far. Just teach your children to never eat something unless they are sure about the ingredients and always wash their hands before eating anything with their hands. I think those are the two big keys for me making it this far. That and trusting my instinct. If I am ever out at a restaurant or even someone's home for a meal and get a bad feeling I'm not going to be safe eating there, I don't eat. It can be a bit uncomfortable, but you have to think of yourself and your life...not being a "good guest". I always have some safe backup food with me that I can eat.
Kyla

Posted on: Sat, 03/18/2006 - 11:40am
Daisy's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/16/2006 - 09:00

So sorry for the news about your son. You must be a bit like, "What next?"
I can only offer you support. But this site offers lots of ideas, school info and information that would be difficult to find, otherwise. I have learned more here in a couple of months than I have in the 12 years since my diagnosis.
Do you have a 504 plan for your daughter? Have you checked to see if there is a support group in your area? The school [i]should[/i] be in charge of monitoring the snacks other parents send in, but unfortunately it seems to fall on the parents of the allergic child.
Daisy

Posted on: Sun, 03/19/2006 - 11:53pm
Gilli011's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/05/2004 - 09:00

Hi there,
In the last year we have found out that both of our daughters are pa/tna. I was just coming to terms with the first one (youngest dd - 2 at the time) when we found out that our oldest dd was pa (5yrs). We found this out 2 weeks before she started kindergarden. I was not prepared to send a pa child off to school, but fortunately the school system here is used to this and is proactive. I also have a 7 month old and was recently told by the pediatrician that it is very likely that he will have pa. I don't think it will bother me quite as much the third time around....it could be worse right?
Cheers, Gilli

Pages

Peanut Free and Nut Free Community

Click on one of the categories below to see all topics and discussions.

Latest Discussions

Latest Post by krisztina Thu, 02/20/2020 - 4:49pm
Comments: 1
Latest Post by chicken Thu, 02/20/2020 - 4:45pm
Comments: 3
Latest Post by lexy Tue, 01/28/2020 - 12:21am
Comments: 6
Latest Post by JRM20 Sun, 01/26/2020 - 11:15am
Comments: 6
Latest Post by JRM20 Sun, 01/26/2020 - 11:11am
Comments: 5
Latest Post by Italia38 Wed, 01/15/2020 - 11:03am
Comments: 10
Latest Post by Italia38 Wed, 01/15/2020 - 10:52am
Comments: 2
Latest Post by penelope Tue, 01/14/2020 - 1:03pm
Comments: 1

Peanut Free Store

More Articles

If children begin to eat many different foods at a young age, there is much more of a chance that by the time they are in school, they will eat...

Those with peanut allergies often find that they are unable to enjoy dessert since there's always the...

If you've ever tried to find...

For those with peanut allergies, baked goods present a serious risk. Many baked goods do not appear to contain peanuts, yet were baked in a...

Those who have peanut allergies know to avoid peanut butter cookies, of course – but what about other...

Which candy bars are safe for those with peanut allergies? Those without allergies are accustomed to...

Are you looking for peanut-free candies as a special treat for a child with...

For those who have wondered whether airport x-ray machines negatively affect epinephrine auto-injectors, the folks at Food Allergy Research &...

Molecular allergy component testing identifies the specific food or environmental proteins triggering a person’s allergic reactions. Component...

An epinephrine auto-injector provides an emergency dose of epinephrine (adrenaline) to treat life-threatening allergic reactions. Those who have...

Misunderstanding the significance of food allergy test results can lead to unnecessary anxiety and dietary changes. The three tests used most...

It can be easy to overlook the presence of nut allergens in non-food items because the allergens are often listed by their Latin or scientific...

Tree nuts and peanuts are distinctly different. An allergy to one does not guarantee an allergy to the other. Peanuts are considered legumes and...

Welcome to the complex world of being a Peanut Allergy Parent. Get ready to proofread food labels, get creative with meals, and constantly hold an...

Take control of your food allergies! Get results in ten days and change your life forever! If you are tempted to use a home testing kit...

What can you eat if you can't eat peanut butter? Fortunately for people with a peanut allergy, there...

According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, one out of five people in the U.S. has an allergy. Because there is a...

Eliminating peanut butter is the best way to handle a rash caused by this food

If your baby or toddler develops a rash caused by peanut...

Nearly all infants are fussy at times. But how do you know when your baby's crying means something wrong? Some babies are excessively fussy...

For those who don't have experience with peanut allergies, going 'peanut-free' often seems as easy as avoiding peanut butter sandwiches and bags...