New to Group

Posted on: Mon, 03/26/2001 - 4:15am
Rob C's picture
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Joined: 03/03/2001 - 09:00

pHello, I just wanted to introduce myself. I am the father of a 5 year old boy, Ryan, who is anaphylactically allergic to Peanuts and Tree Nuts. He also has had asthma and up until this winter chronic bronchitis. My wife is also a new member. She goes by Laura C. She's a Registered Nurse and I'm fairly PC literate so hopefully bewteen us we can be an asset to this group, while also learning from all here./p
pRob/p

Posted on: Mon, 03/26/2001 - 5:43am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Hi Rob and welcome. My husband also scans the boards occasionally and finds it to be a great help. His main interest lies in the research area - when will the cure be available!
I wouldn't be surprised to see a new user name soon... "Cayley's Dad" has his own ideas and opinions to share (just no time to do it!). He'll be glad to see another dad actively involved with the board.
Cayley will be 4 years old in July - her dad is amazing about the PA. He "gets" it, he doesn't hesitate to educate others who don't "get" it and he'll go to any lengths to keep his daughter safe.
Most dads are like this, off the boards, but I'm glad you will be posting with your concerns and help. It's good to get the male parent perspective, and you're right, we moms do seem to outnumber you dads, in terms of posting (I read another of your posts in which you recognized the large number of women posting)!
Again, welcome! We (Cayley's Dad, in particular) look forward to reading your posts!

Posted on: Mon, 03/26/2001 - 6:16am
Rob C's picture
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Joined: 03/03/2001 - 09:00

Cayley's Mom - Thanks for the welcome. I was unsure if I should reply to Mir's problem with her in-laws. I was reading one of those jokes about what the differences are between men and women the other day and something struck me that it may actually be true. It said that when Women complain about something they ofen want someone to empathize with them, not give them an immediate solution. My reaction, after reading the problems was like well just don't bring the child to the in-laws. Is that insensitive to say? I'd like to hear reactions from other women. Can I just blurt out what I feel is a solution to a problem or am I going to end up making people upset (last thing I want to do)?

Posted on: Mon, 03/26/2001 - 6:52am
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Rob - I hope more women will give you feedback, but in the meantime, I have to laugh...
I often tease my opinionated husband, that if he registered as "Cayley's Dad" I could just see "Cayley's Mom" responding after his posts saying "Sorry! He didn't really mean that!!".
Seriously though, I think it's great to have the father's perspective. Women DO want solutions to their problems, but sometimes they just want recognition also, that it is a difficult situation to be in. Hence, the empathy.
I wouldn't worry about offending anyone. We do have other fathers posting occasionally, and to tell you the truth, they get away with bluntness that we mothers wouldn't! Just like real life... *sigh*...
Looking forward to reading your perspective on things. Go for it!

Posted on: Fri, 02/14/2003 - 3:06am
cynde's picture
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Joined: 12/10/2002 - 09:00

Welcome milldill, glad you're getting the info you need. Sorry to hear about all the allergies your DD has and the asthma. Our DS has lots of food allergies and environmental (including dust mites) allergies too, it's not fun. We are in the lower mainland of BC, close to WW.
------------------
Cynde

Posted on: Fri, 02/14/2003 - 7:49am
river's picture
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Joined: 07/15/1999 - 09:00

Welcome milldill! I know that this site has been invaluable to me. I'm looking forward to reading your posts.

Posted on: Sat, 03/18/2006 - 11:40am
Daisy's picture
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Joined: 01/16/2006 - 09:00

So sorry for the news about your son. You must be a bit like, "What next?"
I can only offer you support. But this site offers lots of ideas, school info and information that would be difficult to find, otherwise. I have learned more here in a couple of months than I have in the 12 years since my diagnosis.
Do you have a 504 plan for your daughter? Have you checked to see if there is a support group in your area? The school [i]should[/i] be in charge of monitoring the snacks other parents send in, but unfortunately it seems to fall on the parents of the allergic child.
Daisy

Posted on: Sun, 03/19/2006 - 11:53pm
Gilli011's picture
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Joined: 12/05/2004 - 09:00

Hi there,
In the last year we have found out that both of our daughters are pa/tna. I was just coming to terms with the first one (youngest dd - 2 at the time) when we found out that our oldest dd was pa (5yrs). We found this out 2 weeks before she started kindergarden. I was not prepared to send a pa child off to school, but fortunately the school system here is used to this and is proactive. I also have a 7 month old and was recently told by the pediatrician that it is very likely that he will have pa. I don't think it will bother me quite as much the third time around....it could be worse right?
Cheers, Gilli

Posted on: Thu, 03/23/2006 - 2:30pm
kylaC's picture
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Joined: 02/02/1999 - 09:00

Hi there,
To make you feel better, I'm PA and TNA and in my 30s. I survived not only going to schools that were not peanut-free, but my home was not peanut-free. Far less was known back then and our family doctor didn't really make it clear that I could die from this. So, my Dad and brother used to eat peanut butter sandwiches, peanuts and mixed nuts were sometimes snacked on. Scary, huh? They were extremely careful, obviously, since I never had a reaction. I used to go to friends' homes for birthdays and sleepovers and I know their homes weren't "wiped clean". Somehow, I never had a reaction. I always told people I couldn't eat peanuts/nuts at all and that was enough. But I grew up in Canada and peanuts, nuts, peanut butter just weren't as popular there as in the U.S. If I was ever around someone with a peanut butter sandwich, it smelled really bad to me and I just moved away from the area.
So, take heart. I survived and continue to survive -- having had only one minor reaction in my life so far. Just teach your children to never eat something unless they are sure about the ingredients and always wash their hands before eating anything with their hands. I think those are the two big keys for me making it this far. That and trusting my instinct. If I am ever out at a restaurant or even someone's home for a meal and get a bad feeling I'm not going to be safe eating there, I don't eat. It can be a bit uncomfortable, but you have to think of yourself and your life...not being a "good guest". I always have some safe backup food with me that I can eat.
Kyla

Posted on: Sat, 03/18/2006 - 11:40am
Daisy's picture
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Joined: 01/16/2006 - 09:00

So sorry for the news about your son. You must be a bit like, "What next?"
I can only offer you support. But this site offers lots of ideas, school info and information that would be difficult to find, otherwise. I have learned more here in a couple of months than I have in the 12 years since my diagnosis.
Do you have a 504 plan for your daughter? Have you checked to see if there is a support group in your area? The school [i]should[/i] be in charge of monitoring the snacks other parents send in, but unfortunately it seems to fall on the parents of the allergic child.
Daisy

Posted on: Sun, 03/19/2006 - 11:53pm
Gilli011's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/05/2004 - 09:00

Hi there,
In the last year we have found out that both of our daughters are pa/tna. I was just coming to terms with the first one (youngest dd - 2 at the time) when we found out that our oldest dd was pa (5yrs). We found this out 2 weeks before she started kindergarden. I was not prepared to send a pa child off to school, but fortunately the school system here is used to this and is proactive. I also have a 7 month old and was recently told by the pediatrician that it is very likely that he will have pa. I don't think it will bother me quite as much the third time around....it could be worse right?
Cheers, Gilli

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