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Posted on: Fri, 04/05/2002 - 1:21pm
nuconnexions's picture
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Joined: 07/30/1999 - 09:00

I just sent my e-mail, expressing my hopes that Nabisco, as one of the more allergy-aware companies, will continue to use good manufacturing practices to keep the traditional oreos safe. I also emphasized the impact on not only those with the allergy, but also their families and school mates who try to maintain a safe environment for those with PA.
Steve Kinsley, RD, MCNE
[url="http://www.nuconnexions.com/"]http://www.nuconnexions.com/[/url]

Posted on: Fri, 04/05/2002 - 4:53pm
supermom1023's picture
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Joined: 01/12/2001 - 09:00

I get very emotional when it comes to my pa daughter and that seems to carry over in the way I express my concerns over pa issues. This is what I wrote to Nabisco.
PLEASE DON'T KILL OUR BABY !!!
We are the parents of a beautiful little girl with curly blonde hair and big blue eyes. Her name is Sara. When she was almost 3 we found out that she is deathly allergic to peanuts. Over the years we've watched sadness cover her little face many times because she couldn't have something to eat that other kids were eating. It's a long hard battle to find safe foods for her where she doesn't feel left out or different. Oreo cookies have been a true blessing in helping us with snack time. Everyone we know knows that Oreos are safe but you are limiting our choices of safe snacks by making a peanut butter oreo. PLEASE...don't produce your new Peanut Butter Oreos on the same lines with regular oreo's and better yet, don't even produce them in the same facility. One little mistake on your part could kill our daughter or any other peanut allergic child. Do you really want to be responsible for a child gasping for breath trying to hold onto his or her life? The life of a child is worth much more than your bottom dollar any way you measure
it. Please keep Sara safe.

Posted on: Sat, 04/06/2002 - 1:11am
DRobbins's picture
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Joined: 07/19/2001 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by Going Nuts:
[b]I called Nabisco this morning, and was told that the new peanut Oreos would be made on dedicated lines. Has anyone else received this reponse[/b]
Amy, this is exactly the opposite of what I was told by a Nabisco representative. She had to go check with her supervisor and other people and then call me back to give me the answer, so I really felt that what she told me -- no separate facility, no separate production line -- was accurate. OTOH, a friend who actually saw the original FAAN newsletter with the information told me that Nabisco claimed in the newsletter that regular oreos would still be safe.
However, I doubt that Nabisco's definition of "safe" would be the same as mine: PB version produced and packaged in a separate facility from the regular Oreos. I suspect that Nabisco would feel that cleaning the equipment would make the product safe.
The representative I spoke with told me that Nabisco would only label as "may contain" (or some other type of warning) if they were unable to avoid cross-contamination for some reason. Since this relies on them *knowing* that the cookies were cross-contaminated before there's any warning label at all, I think we're also looking at a lack of appropriate labeling, as well as a product we can't use any more. So anyone new to PA who hasn't read this info about Oreos may only find out that the cookie isn't safe after a reaction occurs. How very sad, because this cookie is so popular, this type of accident is bound to occur.

Posted on: Sat, 04/06/2002 - 2:06am
Mookie's picture
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Joined: 02/17/2001 - 09:00

Sent off my email! Hope it works!

Posted on: Sat, 04/06/2002 - 4:03am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

I sent two emails. The following is the response I received to one of them:
Thank you for visiting our web site!
Before changing any product or flavor significantly, we conduct extensive testing with consumer groups.
- Changes made only if majority of participants respond positively
We will forward your comments.
Please add us to your bookmarks, and visit us again!
---------------------
Reply To: [email]thatboysmom@yahoo.com[/email]
Why is it so difficult to find allergy information on specific products on your web site?
My 3 1/2 year old son has a severe, life-threatening allergy to peanuts. Up
until now, he has been able to eat Oreo cookies and LOVES them. It is one
of the few treats he can eat. However, I heard that Oreo's will now have a peanut butter variety.
May I just ask why? Granted, I understand that individuals with severe food allergies are probably very low on your priority list because they are in the minority.
However, why would you take a product that many allergic individuals are already eating, and then make it unsafe? I may be only one customer out of hundreds of thousands, but I can assure you I won't be purchasing any more Oreo's if you are indeed now making a peanut butter version.
I am wondering how to tell my son why he can no longer eat Oreo's. Please tell me exactly why your company chose to make this, one of his very favorite treats, unsafe for him, so that I can explain it to him.

Posted on: Sat, 04/06/2002 - 11:39pm
Chicago's picture
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Joined: 04/21/2001 - 09:00

Sent my e mail and will ask others to do so too.
Frankly, thinking as a non PA person I think the new flavor sounds gross. But perhaps years of evil thoughts about peanuts have taken their toll...

Posted on: Sat, 04/06/2002 - 11:53pm
arachide's picture
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Joined: 08/16/2000 - 09:00

Hi folks. Long time no see. Just wanted to return the favour to all the American members who helped contact Nestle last year. My email to Nabisco is sent.
(PB Oreos? Sounds mighty unappetizing to me...)

Posted on: Sun, 04/07/2002 - 11:15am
Going Nuts's picture
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Joined: 10/04/2001 - 09:00

Welcome back, Arachide! We missed you!
Amy

Posted on: Mon, 04/08/2002 - 12:20am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

This is the reply that I received to my email:
"Thanks for visiting our web site. We appreciate your interest in our Nabisco products.
Nabisco products are not routinely produced on dedicated lines, and our production schedules are subject to change. If a product is produced on shared equipment, every reasonable precaution is taken to avoid contact with the eight major allergens recognized by the FDA--wheat, soy, peanuts,tree nuts, milk, eggs, fish, and shellfish.
Should cross contact with a food allergen in our production environment be unavoidable, appropriate labeling of the food allergen is implemented. When appropriate, allergen labeling is used in addition to, and not in place of good manufacturing practices.
Please add our site, [url="http://www.Nabiscoworld.com/,"]http://www.Nabiscoworld.com/,[/url] to your bookmarks and visit us again soon!"
[This message has been edited by Colleen's Mom (edited April 08, 2002).]
[This message has been edited by Colleen's Mom (edited April 08, 2002).]

Posted on: Mon, 04/08/2002 - 12:54am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

As I continue to think about this one, it just ticks me off further! Here is another example of a large American company that owns the same company here in Canada that produces Oreos. However, our Oreos will probably remain either "safe" or labeled as "unsafe".
I quite frankly don't understand it. If the Canadian subsidiary of a large American company is able to label or even run products on dedicated lines for say a 10th of the population of the U.S. what the hell is wrong with the American corporations? Seriously! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/mad.gif[/img]
I'm now beginning to wonder if it has something to do with government labeling and manufacturing practices and if by contacting, I guess, the FDA in America, and CFIA in Canada, we could get the answer to this question that continues to boggle my mind.
If you're doing things *right* in Canada, why can't you do it *right* in the U.S. where you have ten times as many customers? It just doesn't make sense to me.
What further enangers me is that the Nabisco line of cookies here (Mr. Christie's) are the only "safe" cookies that I have found for PA people. Dare are not safe. And, as with Smarties, (although I can't remember having Oreos as a child, but then please remember my age [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img] ) , what child shouldn't be able to eat an Oreo?
I still have to contact Nabisco Canada and will post my response from Nabisco U.S. as soon as I get it. If it's like the one from the person who posted above me, I'll remain angry as all hell! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/mad.gif[/img]
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------

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