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Posted on: Sat, 10/14/2000 - 5:57am
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Hi everyone! I have been lurking on this site for several months now, but knowing we were going to move, I decided not to register until now. I am a stay at home mom with one little boy who will be two on the 19th! I gave him milk based formula at 3 months to supplament breast feeding and he broke out in hives wherever it touched. A few weeks later the same thing happened. I was clueless! The pediatricians office said to use soy instead. I continued breast feeding then went to soy formula no problem. But by that time I was giving him cheese and watching him turn red all over. Yogurt did the same. I had no clue but was bothered. Eventually scrambled egg did it too and finally a really thin spread of peanut butter at 10 months made his eyes swell slightly and he was completely covered in hives. They always went away quickly though so I didn't catch on. The peanut reminded me of having heard of life threatening allergies to nuts and that was when I got more concerned. My pediatrician had said basically nothing until this point. I had started looking into allergies on the internet and at that point requested a referral to an allergist. Know what the pediatrician said! "Why?"!!! Well, at eleven months we saw the allergist who was greatly alarmed at how quickly and severly he reacts (within 10 minutes, contact sensitive!). He gave us an epi-pen and talked with us for a bit but said testing wasn't necessary because of the number of reactions he had already had. Well about six months later dh and I were fighting regularly about my "over reacting" so we insisted on a RAST test and the doctor readily agreed. That was a horrible experience, but I'm glad we did it he scored a 2/3 on egg yolk/white, and a 3 for peanut and milk (on a scale of one to 5). Dh has not once accused me of over reacting since - in fact he often catches me being to relaxed! I tend to be a very laid back mom (which was partly why I was so slow in the beginning). At first I thought the rug had been pulled out from under me! What on earth could I feed him? I made two dinners every night and was so overloaded on stress. I cried a lot for the things he will miss in life. But slowly it is falling into place. Not with out occasional set backs. Just the other morning I was at the mall and trying to find a treat to get him, my eyes welled up when I realized there just wasn't anything safe - he can never have a cookie while I shop like other kids! We now carry three epi-pens and benedry with us every where and he wears a medic alert bracelet. I am actively starting to teach him that things "aren't safe for Trace". I just keep praying that he will outgrow ONE of these. But I don't really expect it! Well sorry for rambling, it's just nice to share sometimes! Hopefully I'll be around more now!
CoCo

Posted on: Sat, 10/14/2000 - 5:59am
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Oh- yeah, I forgot. We just moved to Calgary Alberta from the states. Is there anyone here from the same area? I need to find a doctor and am wondering if there are any support groups or anything. Thanks

Posted on: Sat, 10/14/2000 - 7:39am
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When I read your post, I felt as if I were reliving my past. My son was diagnosed with milk and soy allergies at 10 days, egg allergy at 8 months, and peanut/tree nut at 18 months. He outgrew the egg and soy alleries by 4 years of age and the milk allergy by 5 years of age. Your child will probably outgrow these allergies as well. The majority of children do. Peanut/tree nut, and seafood allergies are the ones that are not frequently outgrown. I just wanted to let you know, so that you will have something to look forward to. I know how difficult it is to find something for your child to eat - especially at the mall. It used to break my heart when I had to tell my son, when he was a toddler, that he couldn't have ice cream, etc. like every one else he saw. When he got older, it was easier as he understood. It is work - use your imagination and read labels. You will get through these years just like a lot of us have. It does get better!

Posted on: Sat, 10/14/2000 - 8:29am
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Hi, Trace's Mom, and Welcome to the boards!!

Posted on: Sat, 10/14/2000 - 12:17pm
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It may not seem like it now, but it does get easier with time. Hopefully he'll outgrow a couple of his allergies and that will open up a variety of new foods for him to eat. Good luck to you and welcome to the board! Deanna

Posted on: Wed, 10/18/2000 - 7:30am
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Hi Trace. Welcome to Canada. In my humble opinion the best Canadian allergy awareness site is the one sponsored by the Calgary Allergy Network. Check out [url="http://www.cadvision.com/allergy"]www.cadvision.com/allergy[/url] and you will find all the information including a support group that you are looking for. Take care.

Posted on: Thu, 11/21/2002 - 1:33pm
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Lynn: Don't feel you have to apologize for keeping your daughter alive to ANYONE.
The cafeteria worker probably works very hard at what she does everyday, and her food for 499 kids is probably really tasty [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] but maybe not safe for that 1 allergic child - yours. That cafeteria worker's behaviour towards you was, simply put "bullying" and should be reported to the principal directly by you - don't rely on the teacher, as the teacher seems overconsumed with not being able to have all her "treats for teaching aids" (which is ridiculous in my opinion).
Next time you see the aid worker, mention the problem with her "nutty bar on the desk, on her breath, on her hands, etc" and your daughters allergy - she probably doesn't even know that a peanut allergic child is in the classroom (again I fault the teacher - even something simple as getting a sign on the door helps others become aware) - talk to the aidworker - any caring person will get the message but I again wouldn't rely on the teacher to do this because I don't think the teacher gets it, and it sounds like you're ending up having to do most of the work managing the allergy in the classroom.
Do you have a safety plan in place for the classroom? What if you are really sick and can't volunteer for a few days - does that mean your daughter will be taken out of school? It's not fair that the school is holding you hostage in having only you being responsible for keeping your child safe in their school. What happens when she's beyong the primary grades - you can't be expected to spend your days in the classroom with her - they (the faculty, principal, staff and students) have to be "trained now" so that you can eventually send her off to school where you know it will be safe for her.
PeanutTrace has posted really great school plans and Cindy Spowart Cook and others have posted amazing links and topics that are in the archives in this schools thread, that have helped others put together customized school plans depending on where they live, the laws of the state/country/province.
Becca's (another poster) daughter has a teacher that also relies alot on food in the classroom - for use during lesson plans. Do a couple of searches in this thread with these posters names to bring up their threads on dealing with similar problems in the classroom.
I'm not sure if you're in the UK, US, Canada or elsewhere, but there are posters here from all over, including Australia (my dream destination) who have dealt with or are dealing with getting their classrooms safe for their kids.
Hope you post back to let us know how it's going. Cheers, Syd's mom [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
[This message has been edited by Syd's Mom (edited November 21, 2002).]

Posted on: Thu, 11/21/2002 - 11:13pm
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I can sure sympathize with you Lynn but there are steps you can take to get some measures implemented to protect your child.
Are you in the US? If so, you need to look in to having a 504 implemented for you daughter. If you are in Canada, there are steps you can take as well. Alot of what you are experiencing is due to ignorance on the part of the school administration. They need to be woken up so to speak. A good start would be showing them an educational video such as "It only takes one bite!" or something similar. From a Canadian perspective, having them read the "Duty of Care" article (available through the Calgary Allergy Network) would work wonders I think.
On a good note, with regard to the food issue in the schools. I had much the same problem at my kids school. It seemed that every day was an opportunity for more "FOOD". I mean, on the one hand, we keep hearing how obese North American children are yet the schools are doing nothing to stop the endless Junk Food Parade that comes in to the classrooms every day. When my non PA DD was in JK, there seemed to be a party every week, not to mention all the junk that came in wnenever a child had a birthday. I hated it then and it had nothing to do with PA.
After much head banging on my part, this year our school has seen the light. As of this year, there is no more food allowed in the classroom (as in junk food and the like). If a parent wants to do something special for their child's birthday, they are asked to send in a small token such as stickers or a special pencil. There has been some objection but overall, a success. Not to say that things are perfect at my son's school, but we're getting there.
Start looking into 504's and the like, I think you will find there is more help out there that you might have believed.
Good luck!
Katiee (Wade's mom)
(I bumped up the Duty of Care article for you!)
[This message has been edited by katiee (edited November 22, 2002).]

Posted on: Thu, 11/21/2002 - 11:39pm
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Hi Lynn. I agree with what the other two parents had to say. Your daughter's only five now, but she's going to be in school a long time. I'm not normally a pushy person (I don't think many of us here at pa.com are by nature.) But I gotta tell you, I had to learn to talk to people and explain the way things are. Of course, you want to be as polite as possible, but firm. When dealing with the school, you don't want to turn anyone off, all the while getting your message understood. As others on the board have said, you don't want to be perceived as "that crazy peanut mother." You have to organize your information (all kinds of stuff is available here and from the Food Allergy Network). Then you need to go to the principal with a plan. It was hard for me at first. Who wants to tell someone how to run their school? But it wasn't really like that. Our school nurse isn't the friendliest person, but after giving her food allergy posters and stuff I bought from the Food Allergy Network (not to mention a nice little Christmas gift every year), she and I work together well. You gotta do what you gotta do.
My daughter is really getting more responsible; I'm so proud of her. She's 7 now. Just this week, her teacher told her that another child was bringing in cupcakes for her birthday today. My daughter called the girl and asked her mother to call me about the cupcakes! The mother did, and she read the whole box to me, the icing too. Otherwise, I would have called her. It turns out there is going to be a substitute teacher today. This teacher may have just given my daughter a cupcake (I certainly hope not since the regular teacher has my daughter's information in the substitute folder). But just in case, I know my daughter would say no. I provide a basket full of safe snacks for the teacher to give my daughter instead. Anyway, I wrote the substitute a note saying it was okay for my daughter to have a cupcake.
There is a support group in our area with parents whose children have food allergies. These people are absolutely wonderful. Maybe you can ask you child's allergist if he knows if such a group, or you can find other parents of food allergic children. It helps to talk to others going through the same thing.

Posted on: Fri, 11/22/2002 - 1:16am
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Lynn, I hear you! My dd's teacher(preschool) does food crafts all the time. It drives me insane. I have wasted so much time trying to ferret out safe things I would never have cared about. I also just do not like so much focus on food and especially sweets. It is not in keeping with my day to day food philosophies. I feel we offer our dd too many treats as it is because of comensatinf for her not having the cake at a party or such. I do not like giving her much more than that!
Because I am in a private preschool, I need to be more careful, I think. I also have a tight neighborhood community who all go there, and do not want my dd affected socially by this any more than is needed.
I plan to be more firm, less tolerant, and crystal clear with public scholl, and have not ruled out yanking her from her present preschool. I do think she is safe, an occasional mistake is going to happen here and there(like the aid eating the Snickers), but it needs to be addresses seriously. Our director goes throuth the luches daily. She takes out anything nutty and sends it back home when kids get picked up. The troubles are totally with homemade things. No matter how often they are told, someone always seems to show up with "illegal" food!
I agree it is best to keep these food things to a minimum. I figure Christmas time/Holiday time is one tough one, where I will just always be there, but I go for all the parties, actually. The teacher is busy and siblings show up and it is uncontrollable. I will *never* trust the teacher to watch my child around food at a party. I have seen the difficulty there. I cannot expect her to handle that. However, I wish she would figure out it is simply unsafe and change things.... It is the first year here and they went nut free and are trying and learning.
I could go on and on. I know our public system has a school with tough peanut restrictions. A table for peanuts, not a single nut free table. Nearly a ban, but well controlled. You can email me if you want. I am tight on time, but understand your feelings and could go on a bit sharing and talking about things I have done. [email]imissmandms@hotmail.com[/email]. Becca

Posted on: Fri, 11/22/2002 - 5:50am
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Anonymous (not verified)

Lynn1999_2000, welcome! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] I'll re-raise my son's school plan which adheres to school board policy throughout the province of Ontario, Canada. It was written by another member of PA.com, PeanutTrace. I have found a lot of American PA parents requesting it as well as they try to write their 504 Plans.
I guess my basic question would have to be, what country are you in?
Also, excellent that Katiee re-raised Duty of Care. I can't remember if it's Canadian specific but I know a lot of Americans also using it as part of the information they give to their PA child's school.
I'll re-raise the school plan and then, if I find out you're American, I'll be able to suggest some *good* 504 Plans that have been posted here.
I wasn't able to read your whole post (much banging in the background by my daughter right now, I believe on purpose [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/rolleyes.gif[/img] ) but the teacher has to get a grip. School things irritate me to no end, as anyone here can attest to, and I'm sorry, there are many craft projects that can be made without peanut products. Even the apparently standard peanut butter pine cone, we have wonderful suggestions here on what you can use instead of pb. I truly don't understand this focus focus focus on food all the time in school. I can't remember it 30 years ago.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------

Posted on: Fri, 11/22/2002 - 7:29am
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[This message has been edited by lynn1999_2000 (edited November 22, 2002).]

Posted on: Fri, 11/22/2002 - 9:12am
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[This message has been edited by lynn1999_2000 (edited December 01, 2002).]

Posted on: Fri, 11/22/2002 - 9:25am
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lynn1999_2000,
Definitely look over some of the 504's, which I think could really help you. Also, these directives about peanuts, in my opinion, should be coming from the top-down approach. Where are the Principal and Director of Special Ed on this issue? I would assemble some sample 504's, look over RhondaRS's website info, and arm yourself with a ton of knowledge and get a meeting going with at least the Principal and Director of Special Ed. However, using Rhonda's advice, get a letter from your doctor with the specific criterion for the allergy in regard to 504 designation.
There's so much more to be done, SO much more, than the teacher saying, "Don't bring in any peanuts/peanut products."
And, BTW, 500 kids would be like nothing to our principal. He has 1300+ kids (and growing all the time) from K-3.
[This message has been edited by ryan's mom (edited November 22, 2002).]
[This message has been edited by ryan's mom (edited November 22, 2002).]

Posted on: Fri, 11/22/2002 - 1:03pm
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.
[This message has been edited by lynn1999_2000 (edited December 07, 2002).]

Posted on: Fri, 11/22/2002 - 1:27pm
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Hi Lynn,
I received your email and located this post.
I don't see why you would want to delete your first post on this thread. It is great and to the point!
Also, If we delete your post, since it is the first in the thread, it would delete the entire thread (and all the work and text from those who replied). If we delete the text in a first post on a thread, then the rest of the thread usually doesn't make sense and help those who read the thread in the future. Many other members who are going through similar situations as you gain from your posting!
I hope you will leave your posts (Imagine if everyone edited or deleted their text!). Thankfully, most who contact us to delete a post decide to leave it up when they understand how much their post can do for others and themselves. The teacher may learn a lot and have more compassion from reading experiences such as you posted about. Many schools do not realize what they put us through until they see it! The teacher may learn how you are feeling. This may help your situation!
Let me know what you decide to do.
Stay Safe,
[email]Chris@PeanutAllergy.Com[/email]
[This message has been edited by Chris PeanutAllergy Com (edited November 22, 2002).]

Posted on: Sat, 11/23/2002 - 12:23am
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[This message has been edited by lynn1999_2000 (edited December 07, 2002).]

Posted on: Sat, 11/23/2002 - 12:48am
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[This message has been edited by lynn1999_2000 (edited December 07, 2002).]

Posted on: Sat, 11/23/2002 - 4:13am
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The class is suppose to be eating their lunches in the class room, it is suppose to be a thanksgiving feast. My concern if someone brings their lunch and brings a pbj, of course I will take my daughter and leave.
The news letter friday did remind them that they would be eating in the classroom and that if your child sometimes brings his lunch to school that you might encourage him or her to be part of the group. But nothing about reminding them if they did bring their lunch not to bring peanut items. I know she told them the start of the school year but is it a simple request if I remind her that the parents might need reminding sometimes? I don't want to come over like I am trying to run her class room or anything just feel like percautions need to be taken for my daughters sake.
Lynn

Posted on: Mon, 12/16/2002 - 11:40pm
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Hi
I think you are doing the right thing.I to have a pa goin to school in Jan. I will do what ever it takes to keep her alive.Don't let other people make you feel you are wrong you are right.
Do what ever it takes to keep her or him safe.
Love This Site
synthia( [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Wed, 12/18/2002 - 3:59am
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Hang tough!
You do have rights and their are things you can do to protect your child.
Look into 504.
Look into USDA School Nutrition Program.
Look into Massachusetts Dept of Education site and look at "Managing Life Threatening Food Allergies in Schools". This is a great set of guidelines (76 pages) and covers pretty much everything that needs to be covered.
This is an intimidating situation to deal with. I agree we do not have to apologize for our children's allergies. There truly is nothing to be sorry about...it is what it is.
People can and will be rude or thoughtless but you know what? Fortify your soul. You know who you are and why you must do what you do. That comes first. Others will eventually come to understand...even though it may take awhile....Fortify your soul.
I do believe the path is smoother than it used to be. All that have come before us have smoothed the way already and every step we take as individuals will continue to make this road easier. You can do this....you will do it. There are so many gifts to be "got" here. An education (not only on the inner workings of the Education system...ha ha...but life as well). Hang tight to your family. Believe in what you know. Embrace patience (when you can). Be kind to yourself. Be prepared to stay the course. Be willing to "fight the good fight" with honor. Believe you can and will make a difference. Have courage. Rest when you need to. Choose the company of someone who is kind, supportive, and present. Fortify your soul~
I hope this is in someway helpful to you...inside and out!
Best~
k

Posted on: Mon, 03/11/2002 - 5:05am
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Lea,
Hi and welcome. Can you get an allergist in your area? I would ask for a referral from your Doctor if you can, if not, ask your Doctor for a Cap Rast test. That's just so you can track from year to year here score that rates the severity of the allergy.
You already know she is allergic so it's not something you need right away, but it's available and if it's free, why not?
All I can tell you is read all the board, all sections, and you will understand what the basics are in keeping your daughter safe.
Everyone has their own comfort level so you will in time develop your own.
Talk to you soon.

Posted on: Mon, 03/11/2002 - 7:24am
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I echo the sentiments already posted... you are lucky (wellllll... sort of [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] ) to have found your daughter's allergy at such a young age. And to have already found this website as a resource is a tremendous advantage! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Depending upon how severe and sudden your physician thinks your daughter's reactions are likely to be and (perhaps most importantly) on whether she is ever cared for by someone other than yourself (daycare, babysitters), now might be a good time to introduce her to a Medic Alert bracelet. Our daughter has worn hers since she was 13 months old, and at 3 years old, it has never been taken off of her wrist. She barely notices it is there- so early is definitely better if you plan on having her wear one at all. Its also (I think) a bit easier with a girl since she may view it as "special jewelry" just for her. Our daughter was ironically thrilled with hers... mommy and daddy wear watches (which she covets deeply) and so- viola!- our daughter has a special bracelet instead.
Some children object to wearing the bracelets if they are not introduced until the school years... which is unfortunate, since this is an important safeguard that many schools will insist upon for your child's safety! We were advised to get our daughter accustomed to wearing one at a young age- so far so good.
Welcome! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Mon, 03/11/2002 - 1:43pm
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We recently added an advertisement for medicalert from the PeanutAllergy home page and the PeanutAllergy.Com shopping page (where there are many other products as well).
Here are links to the above mentioned pages, be sure to tell medicalert (or any other company) that you are from PeanutAllergy.Com!
PeanutAllergy.Com Members and visitors, please go and click on one of the medicalert links so they will know their advertising is being seen!
Check out the newly updated medicalert website (notice the link to PeanutAllergy.Com)!
[url="http://www.peanutallergy.com"]http://www.peanutallergy.com[/url]
[url="http://www.peanutallergy.com/shopping.htm"]http://www.peanutallergy.com/shopping.htm[/url]
------------------
Stay Safe,
[email]Chris@PeanutAllergy.Com[/email]

Posted on: Thu, 08/12/2004 - 9:25am
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Hi Julie, glad you found this site!
My son also had his first taste of peanut butter at 11 months, and reacted right away -threw up and broke out in hives. It didn;t progress any further, and it calmed down right away with Benadryl. But it's very important to know that the first reaction is usually not too severe, and is *not* indicative of what a subsequent reaction would be like. The frist reaction is kind of like a warning - any thereafter cou;ld be life threatening.
I'll try to answer some of your questions:
Quote:1. Can babies have a reaction with the first taste? Or does this mean she actually had it before and we didn't know it?
Yes, it can be at first taste - my son's was his very first taste, he definitely had never had anything with pb before.
Quote:2. Her reaction peaked and started to wind down before she even got Benadryl. No severe reaction other than the rash. Any chance this means she's not going to have the more severe reactions next time or that she could outgrow this?
My son's reaction was very mild - he didn't even cry or seem distressed, and it cleared up right away with the Benadryl. Yet, he has tested a 6 - the highest level of allergy. So I don't think you can tell by their first initial reaction. Supposedly there is a 20% chance of outgrowing the allergy, but that is usually if it is a "mild", ie low score, one. Did your doctor do a test yet?
Quote:3. My uncle has a horrible peanut allergy, so I wonder if it's possible to be inherited?
Food allergies can absolutely be inherited.
Keep reading and asking questions, this site is an amazing resource full of information!

Posted on: Mon, 08/16/2004 - 6:13am
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I am a newbie too! My son was diagnosed at age 1 .He had a reaction from SMELLING pb cookies baking. He has never eaten pb. When he was tested he had a full anaphylaxis episode in under 5 min. he is now 3 1/2 and starting preschool and i am scared. I nursed him like you,I wish somebody woulda told me not to eat pb then.My sis is also allergic so I think it is heredity. Mel

Posted on: Wed, 08/18/2004 - 2:16pm
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I am also new to this and am so overwhelmed and scared. My son's first few reactions were mild, thankfully. But, I now know the seriousness of this allergy and find myself almost paralyzed by the fear of his accidentally being exposed to peanuts. Is it possible to live a long life with this allergy? Does anyone know of any "older" adults who have lived with this their whole lives. I feel like it will be impossible for an accident to never happen and with the consequences being so severe, I am panicking. Also, I am finding that everyone in my family says they take it seriously, but CONSTANTLY forget!!! For example my mom is taking my son to a friend of hers tomorrow for lunch and the friend said she was making him chicken and maccaroni, but guess what the rest of the group is having - carmel apple salad with peanuts! And my mom didn't pick up on it....uuuggghhh. Is there any hope for our kids with this?

Posted on: Wed, 08/18/2004 - 3:10pm
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Yes, there is hope. My son is allergic to peanuts, tree nuts, tomatoes, milk, soy, oats and fish.
He is 19 and starting his sophomore year at college 80 miles from home.
Lots of work, lots of training but we did fine and you will too.
Read more on this site and you'll find lots of adults who manage quite well.
Peggy

Posted on: Mon, 01/30/2006 - 8:00am
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Hiya Issy...First of all...Welcome!
I dont know if you posted your post in this thread by accident but you have posted it in "Restuarants" where maybe it will go un-noticed. There is a thread called "introducing your self" where maybe you will get some more replies.
Any questions just ask.
Arlene

Posted on: Mon, 01/30/2006 - 8:00am
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Hiya Issy...First of all...Welcome!
I dont know if you posted your post in this thread by accident but you have posted it in "Restuarants" where maybe it will go un-noticed. There is a thread called "introducing your self" where maybe you will get some more replies.
Any questions just ask.
Arlene

Posted on: Wed, 06/25/2008 - 7:33am
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Just wanted to say Hi and welcome,
My DS is 6 and allergic to peanuts and treenuts. DD has non-ige issues with Rice and Oat.
I'm sorry about your diagnosis. It is hard at first but it does get easier. Do you have any books on the subject yet. I found them to be helpful in addition to what you can find online. I really liked understanding and managing your childs food allergies by sicherer.

Posted on: Wed, 06/25/2008 - 8:05am
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Joined: 06/24/2008 - 08:30

Thanks ;)
I think the most frustrating thing is all the conflicting information....even just within our allergist's office!!! The doc told us to avoid all treenuts even though she didn't test for tree nuts. So I called today (after reading something about shea butter which we've used on dd since birth in all her skin care products) and I spoke to the NP in the office. She seriously asked me FIVE TIMES...so Dr. told you NO tree nuts??? As in, why??? And then when I proceeded to explain to her that her eczema had cleared up she was astonished...she was ready to schedule me for a dermatology appt and I had to tell her again...no the eczema is gone...no need for a dermatologist. And then she said I should probably have a f/u appt with the allergist to ask my questions....but I'm thinking...I paid HUNDREDS of dollars for that first appt...the least she should be able to do is answer a couple questions for me, right? I don't know...it's frustrating and I honestly wonder if the doctors even really know what the heck is going on....Sorry for the vent...just feeling very upset right now over the lack of confidence I have in the medical community....:(

Posted on: Thu, 06/26/2008 - 10:34am
Mrsdocrse's picture
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Joined: 01/16/2007 - 09:00

Hi and welcome!
My DS is now 7 1/2 and we have now since he was 2 that he was allergic! I knew that he was allergic because I gave him some PB and he had a reaction... but it didn't hit me until a week later when we went tothe Dr and he was tested. I creid in the Dr office... I thought as I walked out the door with epi-pen persciption in hand... "How in the world will a keep my baby from dying?" I thought" we can never leave the house" It was so over whelming. But I got a grip after a week or so and let it digest and started thinking more rationally. Since then we have been on a cruise, we have been to Canada, Disney, another cruise to bahama's CA, Washington DC. we have been every where. It is manageable. It does take extra work, and I can't say that I don't get stressed out with all the planning and such for vacations... but we ARE managing it. you will too. Lots of info here

Posted on: Fri, 06/27/2008 - 6:24am
JenniferT's picture
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Joined: 06/24/2008 - 08:30

Mrsdocrse - that gives me a lot of hope. What's funny is...even though we stopped giving dd nuts back in January, I didn't feel so "gloom and doom" until we actually got the official diagnosis and epi in hand :( I mean seriously, nothing had really changed...she didn't have a reaction..she wasn't hospitalized...or even sick...the only thing that changed was that we were now prepared. And, we weren't as strict before about "may contains" and never asked questions at restaurants....thank goodness we never had a problem. We have a family get together in a couple weeks that I am stressing over as I know there will be tons of kids and food...I guess I'll just have to never let dd out of my sight. I've already e-mailed my cousin (who is hosting the party) to get a guage on the menu and to give her a heads up on our situation. Hopefully we'll be able to manage the food situation so it won't be so stressful.

Posted on: Sat, 04/18/2009 - 11:23pm
barbfeick's picture
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Joined: 04/18/2009 - 05:48

Are you allergic to milk or casein? Casein is an ingredient in the first vaccination that is given to children. Peanut , soybean, and sesame oils are used in vaccine adjuvants.

Posted on: Tue, 07/06/2010 - 9:15am
double concerned twinsmom's picture
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Joined: 07/03/2010 - 17:15

It is scary at first. This is a great website for information! My twin daughters are almost 17 now and we have lived with it for 16 years! Look for a food allergy support group in your state. It is nice to get to know others who are dealing with the same things. Do you have specific questions that you would like to ask?
It is scary at first. I remember leaving the girls in Sunday School classes and all of the headaches of trying to get people to UNDERSTAND. After my children were older, I read on here to have a large button made that says, "I have a life threatening food allergy! DO NOT FEED ME!" If you leave your young child in a nursery or early childhood setting, always have it on. Repeat every time that you leave her, "She has a life threatening food allergy." Our girls were triggered multiple times when they were young, because people did not UNDERSTAND. Do not trust other people to read food labels! I cannot tell you how many times someone said they had read a food label and I would know it was not safe and right there in black and white it would have "made on shared equipment" or "cross contaminated" or "peanuts". Every single time the others would say, "I did not even see that." Feel free to ask questions.

Posted on: Tue, 07/06/2010 - 9:15am
double concerned twinsmom's picture
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Joined: 07/03/2010 - 17:15

It is scary at first. This is a great website for information! My twin daughters are almost 17 now and we have lived with it for 16 years! Look for a food allergy support group in your state. It is nice to get to know others who are dealing with the same things. Do you have specific questions that you would like to ask?
It is scary at first. I remember leaving the girls in Sunday School classes and all of the headaches of trying to get people to UNDERSTAND. After my children were older, I read on here to have a large button made that says, "I have a life threatening food allergy! DO NOT FEED ME!" If you leave your young child in a nursery or early childhood setting, always have it on. Repeat every time that you leave her, "She has a life threatening food allergy." Our girls were triggered multiple times when they were young, because people did not UNDERSTAND. Do not trust other people to read food labels! I cannot tell you how many times someone said they had read a food label and I would know it was not safe and right there in black and white it would have "made on shared equipment" or "cross contaminated" or "peanuts". Every single time the others would say, "I did not even see that." Feel free to ask questions.

Posted on: Fri, 07/09/2010 - 11:42pm
BestAllergySites's picture
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Joined: 03/15/2009 - 21:46

Welcome to the site Lora! Your daughter is still very young, it's normal to feel a bit fearful and worried. As time goes on it does get easier.
As the previous poster said--read as much as you can and see if you can find a support group in your area. AAFA--the Asthma Allergy Foundation of America has many free support groups throughout the US.
Try not to think about the horror stories too much. We often post our bad experiences but not always the good ones.
My son is 7 and allergic to peanuts, tree nuts, egg, sesame and soy. He is allergic to all via ingestion and contact--if he touches it and touches his eyes, nose or mouth--he'll have a reaction.
He goes to public school we have accommodations in place to keep him safe and he's done very well as he's gotten older.
The key is to always keep your epi pen on hand and with your child, to keep your child away from her allergens, and to make sure you set good ground rules with her about what food she is allowed to eat, who she is allowed to take food from etc. Also, always mention your allergies when eating out and make sure the restaurant can accommodate you.
Hope that helps, any other questions feel free to ask. This is what the forum is for! :)
Ruth

Peanut Free Store

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