new fa mom

Posted on: Tue, 05/23/2006 - 6:45am
Momof3inIdaho's picture
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Joined: 05/23/2006 - 09:00

Hi there to everyone! A long intro. My 10 m/o dd had some Keebler Club crackers and two small bites of some cinnamon sticks from Chuck E. Cheese a month ago and within an hour her face was fully swollen, eyes swollen shut and in the ER with an IV in her foot. Saw an allergist and he did some standard spt's. She came back pos to pn, cashews, egg white and wheat. We still don't know what caused the ana rx. Could it have been the wheat in the cinnamon sticks, was there egg is in? Chuck E Cheese website says they don't use peanuts or peanut products in their food but did say the cinnamon spread and some icings for their dessert items were mfg in a facility which uses peanut. So we don't know for sure and not sure if we will ever know. We still have pb and peanut containing products in the house as she is young and is just on formula and baby food. But now I am getting nervous. If it wasn't the pn that made her go ana, that would be great, but still scared for obvious reasons. We eat pb alot here and we have never been careful and she has never reacted before or after. Her spt test results said "results expressed as wheal in mm/flare in mm". That seems different than the 2+ or 4+ I have read about. Does anyone know what the wheal/flare mm mean? I would love to know. Look forward to sharing my experiences here and learning from you all!

------------------
Stephanie

Posted on: Wed, 05/24/2006 - 2:04am
Corvallis Mom's picture
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Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

Well, it sounds like you've already done a lot of detective work! I don't know how much help I can offer. But I agree with you that it really doesn't sound like this was pn. Just the same, you should probably assume that pn [i]could[/i] trigger anaphylaxis. Once someone demonstrates that they can anaphylax, any common triggers that they are allergic to need to be treated that way.
The most common anaphylaxis triggers at that age are (far and away) egg, milk, and pn. But soy and wheat can also be responsible. But hey-- this isn't all bad news! Because if it was wheat, milk, or egg, the chances are [i]really really good[/i] that your child will outgrow it by school age.
The other thing I am wondering about is a more common trigger among adults and older kids... but might be a possibility given what you know was consumed. Sesame.
Anyway, a warm welcome to you! I found out about my daughter's allergies at about the same age (she was 11 mo), and in about the same way, I am sorry to say. The nice thing is that this leaves no room for denial. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] My daughter was once allergic to soy, milk, wheat, pn, and egg. This was challenging. (Hmmmm.. serious understatement, that.)
We are still dealing with the pn and egg as anaphylaxis triggers, and have added tree nuts to that list... but the good news is that six years later, she eats wheat and soy just fine. And as a bonus, I have become an [i]awesome[/i] cook. This from someone who used to claim, "I'm domestic. I live in a house, don't I?" [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]
The next few years are the scariest. But you get through them and figure out how to navigate through the world most of the time... it gets easier.
[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Wed, 05/24/2006 - 6:36am
Corvallis Mom's picture
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Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

I wanted to also add that you need to be carrying epinephrine if you haven't been given any yet. Anyone with a history of anaphylaxis absolutely MUST do so. And a pn allergy is considered a high risk anyway. Plus, you should consider getting her a MedicAlert bracelet, since she is very obviously too young to speak for herself if you were unable to speak for her (after an auto accident, for example). That way others would know that she is at risk for anaphylaxis.
I would encourage you to consider removing pn/pb from your house-- it sounds as though your daughter stands a VERY good chance of being one of the lucky few who outgrow the allergy. But the odds go waaaaayy down if they have a few rxns. Many of us here have varying approaches with this one, but most people eventually remove it from the house. If you like pb, try some of the alternatives like soynut butter and Sunbutter. We like sunbutter a lot and it will do everything that pb will.
It also sounds like you may be in for some additional allergy testing. I'd call Keebler and see what they can tell you about other top allergens (including sesame, which I don't think they label for). You may need the box to refer to.

Posted on: Wed, 05/24/2006 - 10:31am
SpudBerry's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/23/2002 - 09:00

Hi Stephanie! I just wanted to send you a wave from my part of Idaho (Twin Falls). I new you had to be from the Boise area since you were at Chuckee Cheese - I think there is only one in the entire state.
I wish I knew of a good pediatric food allergist in Idaho - but we drive down to Salt Lake City to see ours. I hope you can find one in the Boise area.
My e-mail is in my profile, so you can send me any questions anytime you want to - about ANYTHING [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
Sherlyn
Mom to 6 year old twins Ben & Mike - one PA & the other not.
Stay Informed And Peanut Free!

Posted on: Wed, 05/24/2006 - 2:04am
Corvallis Mom's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

Well, it sounds like you've already done a lot of detective work! I don't know how much help I can offer. But I agree with you that it really doesn't sound like this was pn. Just the same, you should probably assume that pn [i]could[/i] trigger anaphylaxis. Once someone demonstrates that they can anaphylax, any common triggers that they are allergic to need to be treated that way.
The most common anaphylaxis triggers at that age are (far and away) egg, milk, and pn. But soy and wheat can also be responsible. But hey-- this isn't all bad news! Because if it was wheat, milk, or egg, the chances are [i]really really good[/i] that your child will outgrow it by school age.
The other thing I am wondering about is a more common trigger among adults and older kids... but might be a possibility given what you know was consumed. Sesame.
Anyway, a warm welcome to you! I found out about my daughter's allergies at about the same age (she was 11 mo), and in about the same way, I am sorry to say. The nice thing is that this leaves no room for denial. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] My daughter was once allergic to soy, milk, wheat, pn, and egg. This was challenging. (Hmmmm.. serious understatement, that.)
We are still dealing with the pn and egg as anaphylaxis triggers, and have added tree nuts to that list... but the good news is that six years later, she eats wheat and soy just fine. And as a bonus, I have become an [i]awesome[/i] cook. This from someone who used to claim, "I'm domestic. I live in a house, don't I?" [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]
The next few years are the scariest. But you get through them and figure out how to navigate through the world most of the time... it gets easier.
[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Wed, 05/24/2006 - 6:36am
Corvallis Mom's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

I wanted to also add that you need to be carrying epinephrine if you haven't been given any yet. Anyone with a history of anaphylaxis absolutely MUST do so. And a pn allergy is considered a high risk anyway. Plus, you should consider getting her a MedicAlert bracelet, since she is very obviously too young to speak for herself if you were unable to speak for her (after an auto accident, for example). That way others would know that she is at risk for anaphylaxis.
I would encourage you to consider removing pn/pb from your house-- it sounds as though your daughter stands a VERY good chance of being one of the lucky few who outgrow the allergy. But the odds go waaaaayy down if they have a few rxns. Many of us here have varying approaches with this one, but most people eventually remove it from the house. If you like pb, try some of the alternatives like soynut butter and Sunbutter. We like sunbutter a lot and it will do everything that pb will.
It also sounds like you may be in for some additional allergy testing. I'd call Keebler and see what they can tell you about other top allergens (including sesame, which I don't think they label for). You may need the box to refer to.

Posted on: Wed, 05/24/2006 - 10:31am
SpudBerry's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/23/2002 - 09:00

Hi Stephanie! I just wanted to send you a wave from my part of Idaho (Twin Falls). I new you had to be from the Boise area since you were at Chuckee Cheese - I think there is only one in the entire state.
I wish I knew of a good pediatric food allergist in Idaho - but we drive down to Salt Lake City to see ours. I hope you can find one in the Boise area.
My e-mail is in my profile, so you can send me any questions anytime you want to - about ANYTHING [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
Sherlyn
Mom to 6 year old twins Ben & Mike - one PA & the other not.
Stay Informed And Peanut Free!

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