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Posted on: Mon, 02/26/2001 - 5:15am
boppaid's picture
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Joined: 02/26/2001 - 09:00

pHi all! I'm new to this board./p
pMy situation is a bit different than yours. PAs run in our family and since they are typically carried by the mother (and they are on my side of the family) our ped said to act as if ds has fatal PAs until he is old enough to have accurate testing. (3)/p
pMy brother has severe nut allergies, so I'm used to a life of reading ingredients, asking about peanut oil at fast food restaurants, etc./p
pIt's a difficult life (as many of you know) not only because you have to be constantly "on guard" but sometimes you're relying on 16 yo kids behind the McDonald's counter to actually find out what kind of oil is used!/p
pAnyhow, that's me and my situation in a nutshell (sorry for the pun). I'm glad to have found this board./p
pDoes anyone have any suggestions or advice regarding testing my ds? Is he too young for accurate testing like my ped says? He's 22 months./p
pThanks again, and it's nice to meet ya'll./p

Posted on: Sun, 10/07/2001 - 11:25am
Leahtard's picture
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Joined: 08/31/2001 - 09:00

Welcome Donna, my name is Leah and my pa daughter just turned 2 today [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] We found about 2 month ago and have been learning lots as we go along, it can be overwhelming at times! This board is great, glad to have you hear!
Leah [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Mon, 02/26/2001 - 5:45am
mom2two's picture
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Joined: 06/09/2000 - 09:00

I don't think he is too young. Have you taken him to a pediatric allergist?
I have never heard that PA is inherited from the mother's side, although blaming mothers, even genetically, is quite the popular thing to do by doctors when true scientific research is inconclusive! I don't think there is any conclusive evidence that its inherited at all, let alone that its x or y chromosome related. Is this info that your ped. gave you or just based anecdotally on your own family history.

Posted on: Mon, 02/26/2001 - 5:56am
blackmoss's picture
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Joined: 12/26/2000 - 09:00

Waiting for accurate testing?? I know my son will be retested at 4-5 only because they want to see what he outgrows and develops and will have a better idea of what he is allergic to. If they are doing a skin test they may wait until four to five since it would constitute an exposure and would be best to wait until those ages if PA is a possibility. BTW my son was diagnosed at 4 months from a skin test.
Jami

Posted on: Mon, 02/26/2001 - 6:00am
Mir's picture
Mir
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Joined: 02/12/2001 - 09:00

Welcome, boppaid! I have to agree that it seems odd your son was deemed "too young" for testing. My DS is only 13 months and has had both blood and scratch tests (both were positive for PA). Although the allergist did point out that there is a chance of incorrect results, he said that generally when the two tests agree they feel safe concluding that there is an allergy. He said the only time they completely disregard test results is in the rare instance where a child has clearly had a reaction, but a test comes up negative.
As for the actual testing, I don't know if one is considered "more valid" than the other. That's a good question for an allergist. I do know that my DS was MUCH more bent out of shape about being held down to have blood taken than he was about being lightly scratched on the back. On the other hand, when the blood draw was over it was over... and he had welts on his back for hours from the scratch test. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img] Neither one is much fun.
If you don't have a problem waiting until he's 3, that's fine. But if you'd like an answer now, I'm sure that an allergist would be willing to test him. I don't suppose it matters either way if you're avoiding peanuts already, but sometimes you just want to know! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Miriam

Posted on: Mon, 02/26/2001 - 2:08pm
rebekahc's picture
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Joined: 12/02/1999 - 09:00

Both of my children inherited their PA from me. We treated them as if they were PA from the day they were born. In fact, we probably wouldn't have tested them if we thought their only allergy was PA. We had Logan tested at 3 because he was having so many health problems. Because of his health problems (not related to PA) we wanted to have Lauren tested. The allergist wanted us to wait until Lauren was 2 because she felt the test would be more accurate. Logan had both the RAST and skin test and Lauren just had the skin test. My experience with pediatricians has been that they aren't very up-to-date on their allergy info especially in regards to testing procedures and guidelines. I would suggest consulting with an allergist preferably a pediactric one and go from there.
On another note, supposedly you cannot test positive or be allergic to a substance without ever being exposed to that substance. Your body has to have the exposure to produce the antibodies. If your DS has had no exposures he may not test positive and could still develop the allergy after having contact with peanuts and nuts. Both of my kids did test positive with no known exposures, though. The only thing we can figure as to how they were exposed was through airborne contact.
Rebekah

Posted on: Mon, 02/26/2001 - 10:06pm
blackmoss's picture
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Joined: 12/26/2000 - 09:00

Mine tested positive through no known exposures as well. I did not eat peanut/nut products while pregnant or breastfeeding. His allergist and pediatrician (when she got the results) was/were absolutely puzzled to see such a large whelp from first exposure.

Posted on: Thu, 10/23/2003 - 11:55pm
kkeene's picture
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Joined: 10/20/2003 - 09:00

HI welcome. I just joined this week too.
My son is now 2 1/2 and have also been dealing with this since 10m (PA & asthma)
We have gone to a few parties now & each time the parents want to know what snack to have what snacks not to have & how to make the cake.
It is very hard to trust someone else when it comes to baking.
I have allowed my son to eat there cake, because I give them the recipe & tell them that they have to wash all utensils well before baking.
(must of my friends don't have peanut B in there home in the first place because there don't want to have to live the way we do)
Anyway it has always worked out for us with the cakes, but I do draw the line there. (no cookies or squares)
My son is also allergic to egg so it makes baking hard. One party we went to my friend had also invited a little boy allergic to milk. So it was a funny cake. But she was trying so hard & I felt that if I didn't help educate her on how to prepare food I might lose any support I had.
I try to work with anyone truly trying to work with us.
(But know how clean some of my friends homes are & I go with that- they're are people that I would not trust)

Posted on: Fri, 10/24/2003 - 12:34pm
new2PA's picture
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Joined: 10/18/2003 - 09:00

I am right there with you! My 1 yr old son is PA, and we found out about 3 weeks ago...1 week before his first birthday! We knew he was allergic to eggs, but the PA was certainly news to us. Luckily, we found out the "easy" way. Since he's allergic to eggs, there was no birthday cake and no ice cream for him at his party...I made a mashed potato "cake" (ok...so it was more of a 'lump' than a cake), and planted a "1" on it. We still got pictures of the mess he made on his first birthday, and more importantly, we still have him. I now have a stopsign on my door, with a caption that says "No food beyind this point" (thanks to someone on here...I printed it from their website).
We all try to do what's best for out children, especially those w/allergies. If someone has a problem with my not letting him have something that someone else prepared, that's exactly what it is: THEIR problem.

Posted on: Sat, 10/25/2003 - 3:22am
Patb's picture
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Joined: 10/24/2003 - 09:00

Thanks, and I feel that connecting with other food allergic families is a good idea at this point. My son starts kindergarten next year and we are busy locating other children with food allergies in town, so he won't feel like the only kid who has to be careful what he eats.

Posted on: Tue, 01/06/2004 - 1:23pm
Renee111064's picture
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Joined: 07/05/2001 - 09:00

Welcome to PA.com. Here you will find lots of parents in the same boat as you.
There are also parents with older children and quite a few adults here.
I'm sure many Canadian neighbors here sould be able to help you out with your questions about school.
Im amd from the USA and can't help you out much with that.
You can do searches on different topics. Feel free to ask questions. Many parents will be willing to help you out as much as possible.
stay safe,
Renee

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