Negative for Tree Nuts - can we eat them in house

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Son is newly diagnosed PA (Class 5 - 72 kU/L Cap-rast)- skin prick tests were completely negative for all other food including all tree nuts. We understand the high risk of cross-contamination so we would never consider feeding tree nuts to my son, (who wouldn't eat them anyway) but what about my husband or me, is it okay if we eat walnuts or cashews in the house? We are going off the assumption that my son at this point is not contact allergic since he has been around peanuts often even though we can't say for sure if he ever ate them until his first ingestion/reaction two weeks ago. His favorite activity at Roadhouse was opening up the peanuts and feeding them to us or feeding the pigeons. In August his "job" was to spread PB on the pie we were making for his Dad. He never had even a slight reaction to that.

The doctor said to just avoid TN, too, but our argument is why did he subject our son to 8 TN skin pricks before the result of the Peanut Cap test (didn't want to do a peanut skin test) if negative or positive he was going to act as if he tested positive?

Any input would be greatly appreciated.

On Oct 10, 2007

When they test kids for food allergies they test for all of the major suspects. Tree nuts are part of that. When my son was skin tested he was almost 5. He had maybe 40 tests on each arm. 8 more or less would not have made much of a difference.

We got rid of all peanuts AND tree nuts in our home. Our son started out not allergic to TNs but testing 13 years later at age 18 revealed TN allergy now big time.

Peanuts are considered a "dirty nut" which means they get all over everything they are in contact with. Many nuts are processed together with peanuts. Or at least in the same facility.

Your son lives in your home and (IMHO) deserves a home atmosphere that is welcoming and safe. I look upon it as an issue of respect. I respect my son too much to be eating tree nuts in his presence, before or after the TN diagnosis.

There are some who will not agree with me. This is the way WE do it.

I am not saying you do not respect your son, not at all. This is very new to you and your son has to learn to live in a world where he is constantly bombarded with peanuts from all sides. He has to learn to keep himself safe, his life depends on it.

So the inside of my home is safe. My son can go anywhere, sit anywhere, eat almost everything and stay safe. It's his home.

Peggy

On Oct 11, 2007

I have actually been reading tn labels at the grocery store lately. We are approaching my son's 3rd bday and we were told to reintroduce tn at that time. We are going to start with rubbing a broken one on his back to check for rx first.

Most of the nuts I have found are cross contaminated with pn, but blue diamond (from the cans I read) are not.

I personally don't allow any cross contaminated things in my house either. I am afraid that I may spread traces of pn in my house.

My son at this time isn't contact sensitive that I know of. His RAST was only 0.82, but I don't want to expose him any more and have his allergy get worse or not go away at all.

This is a comfort zone issue and is very personal to decide. We have decided that any food that comes into our home must be safe for our son, or it doesn't come in. We also don't eat at restaurants that use any pn products in any dish. So I think we are really one of the families that has a pretty restrictive comfort zone.

On Oct 12, 2007

Originally Posted By: Peg541

Your son lives in your home and (IMHO) deserves a home atmosphere that is welcoming and safe. I look upon it as an issue of respect. I respect my son too much to be eating tree nuts in his presence, before or after the TN diagnosis.

There are some who will not agree with me. This is the way WE do it.

So the inside of my home is safe. My son can go anywhere, sit anywhere, eat almost everything and stay safe. It's his home.

Peggy

I so agree with this! I think home is the one place were our children should always feel safe.

~Cindy

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