need your input

Posted on: Thu, 04/05/2007 - 5:07am
paulette816's picture
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Does anyone have statistics or know a web site where I can find out about anaphylaxis as a result of touching or inhaling peanut/nut products....I work in a school and this topic makes teachers so very nervous. I need to give them accurate info.

We have a highly allergic (p-nut) student who, by Mom's account is becoming obsessed about being careful ie. handwashing til her hands are raw... not kissing her parents for fear they may transmit residue...even though they are extremely careful and follow precautions. Anyone with similar issues and how can we help this child?

3rd time this has happened here...the 06-07 school year we had a Mom that asked us to follow all guidelines for her daughter re: nut allergies. Her daughter never had a reaction and was not tested but the Dad was allergic to p-nuts so she feared her daughter was. We followed all recommendations for that school year all the while encouraging the Mother to have the child see an allergist. The mother would not comply...meantime we continued to take precautions....letters to other parents etc. In Oct. of this year she finally took her daughter for testing and her daughter was totally negative. How would you handle a situation like this and do you think this is fair?
In advance....thank you for your input.

Posted on: Thu, 04/05/2007 - 6:10am
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There is very little in the way of statistics because the CDC does not collect data on anaphylaxis. However, there are documented cases of anaphylaxis from contact and inhalation of aerosolized proteins. Most peanut allergic people are not that sensitive, but it sounds as if one of your students is highly allergic and may be one of those people.
You have to understand that children with life-threatening food allergies must deal at a young age with the knowledge that one bite of the wrong food could be deadly. Many suffer from anxiety. If you want to help this girl, make sure that the adults around her are informed about her allergies and take them seriously. Make the school environment as safe as possible. Her anxiety will lessen if she feels that she is in a safe environment and can trust the adults around her.
About the mother who insisted on precautions for the child who had not been tested... I would like to give her the benefit of the doubt. With a father who is allergic to peanuts, the child is at high risk for developing the allergy especially if she is exposed to peanuts at a young age. She has probably not been exposed at home due to the father's allergy, and her parents are probably following medical advice to delay her exposure.
If someone has not been exposed to an allergen, their body is not sensitized to it. This means that allergy tests will be negative. But if that person is later exposed to the allergen, they can become sensitized and develop the allergy. This is particularly true of children, whose immune systems are immature.
The important thing is for the school to make sure the medical needs of its students are met. If the parents are following medical advice to avoid exposing the child to peanuts, then the school needs to take steps to protect the child from exposure.
Cathy
------------------
Mom to 7 yr old PA/TNA daughter and 4 yr old son who is allergic to eggs.

Posted on: Thu, 04/05/2007 - 6:24am
Gail W's picture
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Have the parent(s) provided the school with an epi-pen?
Does you school district require physician orders for the administration of medication, including the epi-pen?

Posted on: Thu, 04/05/2007 - 6:42am
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Re: the issue of the girl who is becoming obsessive...all of those precautions are/have been taking place and the mom feels that it is due to that vigilance this other problem has been created. The school has done everything the parent has requested and has followed all doctor recommendations. So your suggestions while appreciated are not helpful in this situation...but thanks for your reply.
I'm not sure I'm following your thoughts on the girl who ended up not being allergic. We got a letter from the allergist and no precautions are in place now per his information. The mom is not following any guidelines at home either.
I still would like to have some documented evidence about severe reactions from contact or inhalation as these matters are not taken lightly in a school setting. If anyone can help from a reputable allergy immunology source I would greatly appreciate it.
The children in this building have had reactions due to ingestion and not contact or inhalaltion but we take all precautions anyway. Also, we have standing orders from our school physician for epipen use so even if a child with no known food or insect allergy presents with symptoms we are able to provide treatment stat.

Posted on: Thu, 04/05/2007 - 6:56am
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Hi paulette. Statistics on anaphylaxis are pretty sketchy. I haven't personally heard of a documented case of fatal* anaphylaxis as a result of inhalation or contact, but many members here have kids who have had severe reactions to both of these types of exposure. If a child is constantly experiencing swollen eyes, itchy hives, wheezing, etc, etc, it would be hard to claim that they have a safe learning environment even if they don't experience anaphylaxis.
As far as helping the "obsessed" child, I think showing empathy and taking her concerns seriously would be the best path. Trying to use data to convince her that she's over-reacting would be counter-productive - she knows what her body is experiencing better than anyone else.
As far as taking percautions for someone who turns out to be non-PA, that is what I hope I'm doing right now with my daughter. Because her brother is PA, we've asked the daycare to treat her as PA, in the hopes that it will help avoid the allergy. We plan to have her tested this summer, though, well before elementary school. I'd agree that if a family is asking for accomodations at the elementary school level, it would only be fair (for both the child and the school) that they confirm the allergy by testing, unless otherwise advised by their doctor.
Hope this helps!
*Edited to clarify: I meant to say that I haven't personally heard of any deaths from anaphylaxis from inhalation or contact, but as Momcat said, there have been documented cases of anaphylaxis.
[This message has been edited by Greenlady (edited April 05, 2007).]

Posted on: Thu, 04/05/2007 - 7:17am
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I was also wondering what exactly are the percautions you are refering to? Things like a peanut-free classroom and peanut-free tables protect against accidental ingestion as well as inhalation and contact. Given that deaths have been documented from ingestion of an unbelievably small amount of allegen (e.g. Robyn Allen, who died from eating a sandwich that had been cut in half with a knife that had been used to make a pbj sandwich and then wiped clean), your school's percautions may be reasonable even if the risk from contact reactions is small.

Posted on: Thu, 04/05/2007 - 7:39am
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Thanks for your response. We are taking this child seriously and she has been reassured that we are all watching...ie. letters to other parents re: snacks, nut free table in cafeteria, epi-pen in place, all parties being trained, identification of student to all her teachers, table wiping, handwashing, food workers aware. This is her 3rd year with all of the above and for some reason, she doesn't seem to trust us and is becoming almost hyperaware. The Mom has asked if she should seek psychological because help she is getting so bad with this. I have discouraged this for now as I'm hoping that with continued talking she comes to balance things in her mind and understand that we are all taking the necessary precautions for her safety. Thanks for your input...I'd like to also hear from others as well.

Posted on: Thu, 04/05/2007 - 8:50am
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It sounds as if this is a developmental stage where she is becoming more aware of the dangers of her allergy. I don't think this necessarily means that the school should change its approach to prevention. It sounds like you are doing a lot of good things to protect her.
Maybe working with her to teach her to read labels, ask questions about food, feel comfortable explaining her allergy to others, practice using the epipen and so forth will help her feel more in control of her allergy. Of course, she will still need all the support and accommodations you have made at school while she takes these baby steps.
Also, I don't think counseling is such a bad idea. It might help her to talk about her feelings.
I think it's important not to minimize the risks she faces or dismiss her anxiety. There are real risks, and anxiety can be protective. What she needs to find is the right balance. This is what we call our "comfort zone." When our kids are young, we parents must find our comfort zone. As they mature, kids must find their own comfort zone. It sounds like she is in the process of doing that.
Cathy

Posted on: Thu, 04/05/2007 - 8:51am
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Posts beginning March 19, 2007 "Feeling sad" under Living With Peanut Allergy is about 11 and 12 year olds and might be helpful for you to read.
My son is 10 and PA/TNA. I personally would at least want to address the "obsessive" situation with a counselor or psychologist -- As much as we know you are doing everything (and her parents), she is not feeling that way. Feelings that are not acknowledged, may make it worse for her.
Also, is it possible she has Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.

Posted on: Thu, 04/05/2007 - 11:07am
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My son is just 6, but he is showing some signs of anxiety already in school. The school serves pb&j's on Monday's and he asks me to come every week...and I have. He says he's afraid someone might touch him with their sandwich, understandable....I am also in the process of our 504 designation for him as well and I will be asking the school for some couseling or psychiatric help if they want to continue serving the pb....he needs to know he is okay, which I tell him all the time. But you know, I understand his fear...heck the very thing that could possibly kill him is just feet away, how in the world would I react...anxious!!! But it is about comfort zones, right now the comforts zone is what I've established and like previous posted stated, he'll be developing his own in time. I do think the handwashing girl does need to professional help, before it's too late(since the parents have tried everything) and developes into a disorder. anyways, good luck, this is hard, at least it is for me!
------------------
Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig and EE)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)

Posted on: Thu, 04/05/2007 - 11:31am
Gail W's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by paulette816:
3rd time this has happened here...the 06-07 school year we had a Mom that asked us to follow all guidelines for her daughter re: nut allergies. Her daughter never had a reaction and was not tested but the Dad was allergic to p-nuts so she feared her daughter was. We followed all recommendations for that school year all the while encouraging the Mother to have the child see an allergist. The mother would not comply...meantime we continued to take precautions....letters to other parents etc. In Oct. of this year she finally took her daughter for testing and her daughter was totally negative. How would you handle a situation like this and do you think this is fair?
I think this is really interesting.
How old is the child? I'm just curious. . .
Allergists suggest that parents avoid introducing foods too early and delay introducing certain foods as a preventive measure to avoid developing food allergies. And many posters here practice exteremley strict avoidance in the hope that our children have a greater chance to outgrow their allergy. Since that child had a clear genetic predisposition to atopy (father has allergies), I can understand why the mother would want to avoid exposure. So, like Momcat posted, I can totally see that she may have been trying to keep her duaghter away from the exposure with the hope that this would prevent her from developing PA.
But don't feel that your efforts were 'wasted' because she tested negative. It could be true that the very lack of her exposure (through some of the safeguards you provided her) contributed to the fact that she tested negative. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] Who knows. It can't be proven one way or the other.
So to answer your question~ Yes, I think it's 'fair' for a child, especially a young child, who has a predisposition to allergy with no testing (or even a negative test) to receive accommodations to avoid developing a food allergy.

Posted on: Thu, 04/05/2007 - 12:25pm
Gail W's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by paulette816:
I still would like to have some documented evidence about severe reactions from contact or inhalation as these matters are not taken lightly in a school setting. If anyone can help from a reputable allergy immunology source I would greatly appreciate it.
Intentially exposing children to their known allergen isn't studied much because of the potential consequences. A child died years ago in a study testing immunotherapy on children with PA. Like I posted above, even small exposures from contact may have consequences regarding whether or not the child will/may increase their sensitivity and impact their ability to outgrow their allergy, so it takes very careful consideration about intentially exposing children in such studies. I think it would be tough to pass a "human subject review" to conduct such a study.
There is a published study that you may have come across regarding 'contact reactions to peanut' . . . June2003 I think. It was a very limited study where PA subjects had a dab of peanut butter place on the backs. The study showed that several subjects had redness, hives, etc.
The reason I mention this study is that it is often 'misused' by readers who don't take the time to really read it and become familiar with its paramters. Children don't typically have that type of contact exposure to peanut residue. What we normally see is our children touching contaminated objects with their [i]hands[/i] and not their [i]backs[/i]. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] Humans are constantly touching their faces (documented studies) and it makes sense that children would transfer peanut residue from their hands to mucosal membranes such as eyes, nose and mouth. An allergen entering the body through mucosal membranes and/or mouth is a very different to an allergen sitting on the skin surface of a person's back. (If my memory recalls, in that study, the peanutbutter was not placed on an area of skin that had any sign of breakage/damage.)
My daughter's allergist was familiar with that study and developed a different type of contact challenge that he thought reflected a more realistic exposure of contact in a school setting. He contaminated markers, wiped them clean, then observed her as she used them. Here is the link. Make sure you go to the end where I posted his letter describing her reaction that included a swollen lip:
[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum1/HTML/004077.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum1/HTML/004077.html[/url]
ETA: You may also want to check out the link Chris included in the link above.
[This message has been edited by Gail W (edited April 06, 2007).]

Posted on: Fri, 04/06/2007 - 1:57am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Quote:Originally posted by paulette816:
[b]3rd time this has happened here...the 06-07 school year we had a Mom that asked us to follow all guidelines for her daughter re: nut allergies. Her daughter never had a reaction and was not tested but the Dad was allergic to p-nuts so she feared her daughter was. We followed all recommendations for that school year all the while encouraging the Mother to have the child see an allergist. The mother would not comply...meantime we continued to take precautions....letters to other parents etc. In Oct. of this year she finally took her daughter for testing and her daughter was totally negative. How would you handle a situation like this and do you think this is fair?
In advance....thank you for your input.[/b]
Personally, I think that sounds unreasonable. A parent having an allergy means there is a higher risk that the child will have an allergy -- but not necessarily the same allergy.
I have two food allergies. Prior to having my son tested, the school was informed of the possibility of food allergies in him (he actually did have some signs). I can understand a parent saying that they are NOT to give him any food. I can understand a parent saying he is not to sit close to peanuts. But to insist of other parents reading labels and not sending in certain food when the parent of the child won't get him/her tested -- that's unreasonable. Passing the buck. Reminds me of the young adult in my city that wants all public places to ban peanuts because she had a reaction and didn't have an unexpired epi-pen with her. She needs to take responsibility for herself but couldn't be bothered, so she wants everyone else to do it for her. (Remember -- I said adult.)
As for statistics, I've never seen/heard of any. I don't think they would be available. If a person with a peanut allergy has an anaphylactic reaction, the first thing looked at would be obvious peanuts, then may contains. If nothing could be traced, then people would have to decide whether they thought it was something they forgot was eaten, or could it have been a reaction from contact.
I have read of doctors witnessing contact reactions -- but they weren't anaphylactic. But, when you think of children -- touching the protein with their hands, then rubbing their noses or mouths, or chewing a toy with the protein on it -- it's a contact [i]more[/i] than just contact -- it's an ingestion, and therefore is a risk.

Posted on: Fri, 04/06/2007 - 2:16am
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We do have someone on this board whose child has had several non-ingestion reactions requiring epi and ER. The reactions were either contact or airborne, don`t recall which. Her user name is something like CVRTBB. She posted on the Main Board about this. Maybe someone can find it.

Posted on: Fri, 04/06/2007 - 2:54am
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Quote:Originally posted by Gail W:
[b] I think this is really interesting.
How old is the child? I'm just curious. . .
Allergists suggest that parents avoid introducing foods too early and delay introducing certain foods as a preventive measure to avoid developing food allergies. And many posters here practice exteremley strict avoidance in the hope that our children have a greater chance to outgrow their allergy. Since that child had a clear genetic predisposition to atopy (father has allergies), I can understand why the mother would want to avoid exposure. So, like Momcat posted, I can totally see that she may have been trying to keep her duaghter away from the exposure with the hope that this would prevent her from developing PA.
But don't feel that your efforts were 'wasted' because she tested negative. It could be true that the very lack of her exposure (through some of the safeguards you provided her) contributed to the fact that she tested negative. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] Who knows. It can't be proven one way or the other.
So to answer your question~ Yes, I think it's 'fair' for a child, especially a young child, who has a predisposition to allergy with no testing (or even a negative test) to receive accommodations to avoid developing a food allergy. [/b]
you explained that well...I am doign the same thing for my 3yr old, so far he is negative with testing, but I just don't thnk we are out of the woods yet...so we strictly avoid, just as if he were my PA child. I think it's great the school made accommodations based on what wasn't yet diagnosed.
------------------
Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig and EE)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)

Posted on: Fri, 04/06/2007 - 3:16am
Gail W's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by AnnaMarie:
[b] But to insist of other parents reading labels and not sending in certain food . . . [/b]
Seeking clarification from paulette816. . . did the mother expect that (above)? If so, I missed that. . .

Posted on: Fri, 04/06/2007 - 6:22am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Quote:The mother would not comply...meantime we continued to take precautions....letters to other parents etc.
Gail, I am assuming letters to other parents would mean the other parents were not to send in certain products. If not, I'd be curious to know what/why the other parents needed to be told.

Posted on: Fri, 04/06/2007 - 6:57am
Gail W's picture
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Gotcha. Now I see where you're coming from. Yes, I'm curious to know what accommodations other parents were asked to give.

Posted on: Fri, 04/06/2007 - 8:48am
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Sorry... for the delay in writing....I've been spending a lot of time in church since I'm such a good Catholic girl. Anyway...the parents expected all the same precautions as I mentioned before for the other PA students...watching what snacks were sent in...everyone notified...everyone taught about reaction symptoms....epi-pen orientation..pics of student to all of studetns contacts etc. By the way she is 7.

Posted on: Fri, 04/06/2007 - 11:18am
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Quote:Originally posted by paulette816:
[b]Re: the issue of the girl who is becoming obsessive...all of those precautions are/have been taking place and the mom feels that it is due to that vigilance this other problem has been created. The school has done everything the parent has requested and has followed all doctor recommendations. So your suggestions while appreciated are not helpful in this situation...but thanks for your reply.
I'm not sure I'm following your thoughts on the girl who ended up not being allergic. We got a letter from the allergist and no precautions are in place now per his information. The mom is not following any guidelines at home either.
I still would like to have some documented evidence about severe reactions from contact or inhalation as these matters are not taken lightly in a school setting. If anyone can help from a reputable allergy immunology source I would greatly appreciate it.
The children in this building have had reactions due to ingestion and not contact or inhalaltion but we take all precautions anyway. Also, we have standing orders from our school physician for epipen use so even if a child with no known food or insect allergy presents with symptoms we are able to provide treatment stat.[/b]
I don't have statistics but I can direct you to 'Guidelines for Managing Life-threatening Food Allergies in Connecticut Schools'.
[url="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&sa=X&oi=spell&resnum=0&ct=result&cd=1&q=guidelines+for+managing+life-threatening+food+allergies+in+connecticut+schools&spell=1"]http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&sa=X&...schools&spell=1[/url]
The above link will take you to a google page. Click on what should be the 2nd PDF file. Pages 3-6 are esp good.
On page 3 it says that while anaphylaxis from contact and inhalation are rare they can occur *but* if a child *touches* a food allergen (and this can happen to even trace amounts) and then touches his or her eyes, nose or mouth then this becomes *ingestion* of the allergen and anaphylaxis can result.
The 'Peanut Allergy Answer Book' by Dr. Michael Young (one of the top allergists in the USA) (oh, and this is volume 1) says on p 56 when talking about cross contamination, "Very small amounts of food that may not be obvious or visible to the cook, particularly oils and liquids, may be left behind to contaminate the next entree. Studies show that for most food allergies, as little as fifty to 100 mg of food protein can be enough to cause an allergic reaction. However, because the peanut allergen is so potent, even 100 ug of peanut protein (one thousand times less) can induce allergic symptms in patients."
I don't know what accomodations you are questioning but hand washing at the start of the day, after meals, having allergy-free tables, having younger classrooms be free of the children's allergens totally and sometimes continuing this all the way through school, etc are *common* and not at all excessive accomodations.
People can react to food residue that gets spread by others who have touched an allergen and then touched another surface. The food allergic person then comes along and touches that surface and touches his eyes, nose or mouth and a reaction can happen. The closer the person is to food the more dangerous. This food residue is more likely to be left around in areas were people eat or where people go right after eating.
In the case of the child with the father, I don't understand why you think something should be done now. It sounds like the school agreed to make accomodations that turned out to have been unnecessary but at the time you had no way to know. I would suggest in the future your school think of requiring testing of children like this. My friend's son had a minor rash to peanuts as a baby so they kept him away from them but never tested. His school, in Massachusettes required him to be tested when his parents filled out his past reaction on a medical sheet. Turned out he tests positive and is allergic. This kind of rule could be helpful in cases like this. But with this particular case I would let it go and forget it.
Oh, and I just read down the thread and I would actually encourage counseling now. Those symptoms can happen to food allergic children and once it gets to that point I think it is really beyond what the school along is oging to be able to help. My son is just 5 and already shows some signs of stress from this. I hope it doesn't get worse. He is worried about mistakes because he says they remind of him of the mistake I made when I fed him something with his allergen accidentally. I'm thinking of couneling for him already just from this.
sounds like your school has a good plan in place for food allergic kids and I think that is great.

Posted on: Fri, 04/06/2007 - 12:13pm
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Thanks so much for all your input. I'd like to respond to your suggestion of having the school require a parent to have documentation before the child starts school. We asked all year for the Mom to see an allergist for confirmation. What were we to do in the meantime? Our hands were tied essentially because she kept promising to do so and didn't. We could require til we're blue in the face, but in the meantime while we're waiting, the school wouldn't dare not have a plan in place for fear of reprisal. In most cases we don't have a problem with parents providing the necessary information...thank God. I can tell you though that after it was found out that the girl wasn't allergic, people were not very happy that the Mom had us jumping through hoops for a year. This is taken so very seriously in our district. I think people felt misled. I don't understand why somebody would want to do something like that and be under such stress thinking that their child was allergic. Anyway..I do appreciate all of the input all of you have provided and I will refer to your article for furhter reading. Happy Easter All!

Posted on: Fri, 04/06/2007 - 11:10pm
Gail W's picture
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Wow. This is so interesting. I think I understand your dilemma now. Essentially, your school provided a child protections and accommodations under Section 504 without having a 504 evaluation/designation. Right?
Cart before the horse.
The parent has the right to consent/refuse to the child's evaluation under Section 504. If the parent refuses, then the process stops (no evaluation, no designation, and no accommodation plan).
If the parent consents to the evaluation process, 'information from a variety of sources' including those who are 'knowledgeable about the child and the disability' are considered. This is where the information from the allergist is required.
I think I understand your concern now. . . I see the question as, [i]Is it fair for a parent to obtain accommodations without an evaluation? [/i] I think this question is already addressed by the 504 process. The horse (504 process) pulls the cart (accommodations).
Maybe you could suggest to your district that all children who are suspected of having a Life-threatening food allergy be evaluated under Section 504. That would make for a great school board policy. That way, there is a fair evaluation and complete evaluation prior to accommodations being created.
What do you all think?
[This message has been edited by Gail W (edited April 07, 2007).]

Posted on: Fri, 04/06/2007 - 11:26pm
Gail W's picture
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In your profile I see that you are in the state of Pennsylvania. Have you seen this from your state regarding a parent who requests accommodations for their child?
[url="http://www.pacode.com/secure/data/022/chapter15/s15.6.html"]http://www.pacode.com/secure/data/022/chapter15/s15.6.html[/url]

Posted on: Fri, 04/06/2007 - 11:47pm
KS mom's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by paulette816:
[b]Does anyone have statistics or know a web site where I can find out about anaphylaxis as a result of touching or inhaling peanut/nut products....I work in a school and this topic makes teachers so very nervous. I need to give them accurate info.
*I don't have any statistics for you. All I can tell you is that my 12 yo dd is one that has had anaphylactic reactions to cotact and inhalation. The contact reactions, I believe, are because my dd touched something with a trace amount of pb and then touched her face. I try to instill in her how important it is not to touch your face but with a child who has terrible environmental allergies, she always seems to have an itchy eye or runny nose, it is near impossible. She has also had several reactions from being near someone eating peanuts (not pb). By the time she reached grade 3 the school found it necessary to restrict peanut products in the school as she was reacting evryday and the reactions were getting progressively worse to the point of anaphylactic reactions.*
We have a highly allergic (p-nut) student who, by Mom's account is becoming obsessed about being careful ie. handwashing til her hands are raw... not kissing her parents for fear they may transmit residue...even though they are extremely careful and follow precautions. Anyone with similar issues and how can we help this child?
*My dd went through a similar thing at about age 8. She was especially worried at school but even at home she would be anxious about her allergy. It was a difficult time but eventually with our reassurance, her anxiety eased. I think it is great that you are giving her the assurance that she is safe. I wish there were more caring people like you in the school system. At my dd's school there was a teachers aide who did the same with my dd. I always knew she was watching out for dd. I know that it really reassured me.*
3rd time this has happened here...the 06-07 school year we had a Mom that asked us to follow all guidelines for her daughter re: nut allergies. Her daughter never had a reaction and was not tested but the Dad was allergic to p-nuts so she feared her daughter was. We followed all recommendations for that school year all the while encouraging the Mother to have the child see an allergist. The mother would not comply...meantime we continued to take precautions....letters to other parents etc. In Oct. of this year she finally took her daughter for testing and her daughter was totally negative. How would you handle a situation like this and do you think this is fair?
In advance....thank you for your input.[/b]
*I think this is completely unfair. I can understand why the parents were upset. Its things like this that will make it difficult for the next child who comes along that actually needs some accommadations.*
I don't know what I did here...I tried to answer within your quote and now my post and your post are mixed together. I am such a computer dummy. I put a little asterix at the beginning and end of my words. Sorry for the confusion
[This message has been edited by KS mom (edited April 07, 2007).]

Posted on: Sat, 04/07/2007 - 1:01am
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KS Mom, I agree that things like this can make it more difficult for the parent of a child that needs accommodations. How many times will a person (or school) jump through those hoops only to find out after the fact that it wasn't necessary. It can cause resentment, and then when it really is necessary the people involved won't listen.
Gail, your horse and cart analogy is very good. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Sat, 04/07/2007 - 2:26am
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This is such a good example of how the 504 process benefits the [i]school. [/i] Didn't someone start a thread about that? Was that you MomCat? Something like, why would the school *want* to have a 504 plan for a child with LTFA. . .

Posted on: Sat, 04/07/2007 - 2:41am
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Three things.
1.Gail, could you put that link in the links thread? I think it is a good one.
2. Great cart/horse analogy.
3. My son had anxiety last year, 1st grade, that seemed obsessive & hypervigilant. He is in 2nd now, and though he has one thing he does now, he doesn't do any of the other. A couple examples I will give is with regard to clothing. It was unusually cold and rainy here all last year. So, my son wore his windbreaker a lot. Well, he was constantly asking me to wash it -- and he'd do so because other people touched it, and he was worried about what they might have had on their hands, etc. Of course, there happened to be one boy in his class who seemed to be touchy, feely with everyone, so nearly every day I'd get the request to wash the jacket because so-and-so touched it while he wore it, or even when it was hanging on his chair.
He also would change his clothes almost everyday when he'd come home from school. Again, worried about surfaces, contact, etc.
There were other things. But the thing that I did about it was to allow him to do or request the things that would ease his mind, while working through the logic of the situation. Eventually, even if he wants to change his clothes for a reason with regard to the allergy, to change the emotional "freak out" feeling to it is important.
I don't know if that makes sense. I do think an awareness is part of it, that our FA children have to gain, for their own growth with what they have to know for their safety. For some, it might show itself in a period of anxiety manifesting in obsessiveness and hypervigilence with things surrounding their allergy.

Posted on: Sat, 04/07/2007 - 3:01am
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Quote:Originally posted by Gail W:
[b]This is such a good example of how the 504 process benefits the [i]school. [/i] Didn't someone start a thread about that? Was that you MomCat? Something like, why would the school *want* to have a 504 plan for a child with LTFA. . . [/b]
Yes. [url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum7/HTML/002156.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum7/HTML/002156.html[/url]
I think your analysis of the situation is right on the money, Gail.
Also, I would like to say to Paulette that now I think I understand your frustration about the child who ended up testing negative. Your efforts may not have been in vain, however. Helping this child strictly avoid peanuts for another year may have made the difference and prevented her from developing a peanut allergy.
Cathy
------------------
Mom to 7 yr old PA/TNA daughter and 4 yr old son who is allergic to eggs.

Posted on: Sun, 04/22/2007 - 1:36pm
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Quote:Originally posted by Gail W:
[b]you may have come across regarding 'contact reactions to peanut' . . . June2003 I think. It was a very limited study where PA subjects had a dab of peanut butter place on the backs. The study showed that several subjects had redness, hives, etc.
The reason I mention this study is that it is often 'misused' by readers who don't take the time to really read it and become familiar with its paramters. Children don't typically have that type of contact exposure to peanut residue. . . .[/b]
linking: [url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum1/HTML/009409.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum1/HTML/009409.html[/url]

Posted on: Tue, 04/24/2007 - 4:22am
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Joined: 01/24/2007 - 09:00

Hi, I feel so sad for that girl! I have been thinking about her, poor dear. One thing I have done with my own pa daughter is teach her to cook at a very young age. I would show her how MUCH she COULD eat as opposed to how much had bad ingredients. I stocked our house with all good things. She could experiment and taste to her heart's content. ((I know a lot of you with multiple allergies cringe at this idea, but all I mean is it worked for us)). I think it helped keep her fears manageable because we always tried to balance the negative with the positive.
I am in favor of kids having counseling whenever they show some kind of fear like you have described here. (I am also deeply in favor of parents receiving counseling LOL). A therapist can help her learn coping skills, like focusing on her breath to calm herself. Sometimes talking to an objective person can help.
It is very good to hear that someone other than the girls' family is so concerned for her.

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