NASN: Role of the SChool Nurse on the 504 Team

Posted on: Wed, 02/01/2006 - 1:45am
Gail W's picture
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[url="http://www.nasn.org/Default.aspx?tabid=280"]http://www.nasn.org/Default.aspx?tabid=280[/url]

excerpt:

[i][b]THE ROLE OF THE SCHOOL NURSE[/b]

The professional school nurse is an integral member of the 504 team. The school nurse routinely identifies students with physical or mental disabilities and notifies the school that certain students may require accommodations or other services under Section 504. The school nurse is the professional who gathers and interprets health information and who therefore, has the most information about students

Posted on: Wed, 02/01/2006 - 1:54am
notnutty's picture
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From the website:
"Many districts consider the IHP to be a 504 Plan in the cases where a student needs only the health-related accommodations outlined in the IHP to access education. The IHP then, is subject to the regulations of Section 504. Therefore, once the 504 team has determined eligibility for an individual student, the team then can determine whether academic accommodations are also needed for the student to access education. If classroom or academic accommodations are needed, then those accommodations can be written as the 504 Plan and the IHP can then be added to the 504 Plan as an accommodation."
This really confuses me. I thought once academic accommodations were needed then an IEP was needed...I thought the 504 was specifically for "health-related" accommodations.
Am I reading this wrong or misunderstanding the theory here?? An IHP does not give you the same protection as a 504...right?
Donna

Posted on: Wed, 02/01/2006 - 2:15am
MommaBear's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by notnutty:
[b]
This really confuses me. I thought once academic accommodations were needed then an IEP was needed...I thought the 504 was specifically for "health-related" accommodations.
[/b]
My cubs Life Threatening Food Allergies and Asthma are accommodated and addressed under the qualifying criteria of [b]"Other [i]Health[/i] Impairment"[/b] in an [b]IEP[/b] through IDEA.
I reraised this thread
[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum7/HTML/000966.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum7/HTML/000966.html[/url]
to compliment this discussion and in particular, this post from it (February 1):
Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear:
[url="http://www.nasn.org/briefs/idea.htm"]http://www.nasn.org/briefs/idea.htm[/url]
Link to:
"National Association of School Nurses
ISSUE BRIEF
School Health Nursing Services Role in Health Care"
entitled:
[i]"School Nurses and the [b]Individuals
with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)"[/b][/i]
Disclaimer: just posting a link for discussion, and am not offering advice in any manner or form.
Link to separate post:
[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum7/HTML/000989.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum7/HTML/000989.html[/url]
I would hate to be dismissive of IEP's and OHI as a potential method of addressing LTFA. What do I know.
General Disclaimer: I am not offering advice in any manner or form. Just speaking personally.

Posted on: Wed, 02/01/2006 - 2:59am
Gail W's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by notnutty:
[b]From the website:
[i]"Many districts consider the IHP to be a 504 Plan in the cases where a student needs only the health-related accommodations outlined in the IHP to access education. The IHP then, is subject to the regulations of Section 504. Therefore, once the 504 team has determined eligibility for an individual student, the team then can determine whether academic accommodations are also needed for the student to access education. If classroom or academic accommodations are needed, then those accommodations can be written as the 504 Plan and the IHP can then be added to the 504 Plan as an accommodation."[/i]
This really confuses me. I thought once academic accommodations were needed then an IEP was needed...I thought the 504 was specifically for "health-related" accommodations.
Am I reading this wrong or misunderstanding the theory here?? An IHP does not give you the same protection as a 504...right?
Donna[/b]
It is confusing. I'll share my interpretation, and hope others will too...
When we requested a 504 designation, the eligibility Team was instructed to consider eligibility under IDEA (an IEP) as well. It was stated that this was part of their remit. I think you're right that the passage should have probably stated:
[i]"If classroom or academic accommodations are needed, then those accommodations can be written as the 504 Plan [b]or IEP[/b] and the IHP can then be added to the as an accommodation."[/i]
You are correct that an IHP does not give you the same protection as a 504. Both are considered legally binding documents, but the 504 gives your child more protection under the law because you have specific rights granted to you including the right for your child to be "educated with non-disabled students to the maximum extent appropriate".
When my DD had an IHP without the 504 designation, the school nurse segregated my DD in order to keep her safe. An example was that they provided her with a PF cafeteria table but the table was different and because it was smaller it did not allow her to be with her non-disabled peers. When she was given the 504 designation, it was clear that legally she was entitled to more accommodations that would allow her sit at the "regular" table.
Currently our 504 plan includes an IHP as one, primary component. There are additional components, a worksheet that the school counselor fills out for school activities for example, that are assigned to other staff members. But the main difference now is that the 504 plan is administered by the school counselor, not the school nurse as was the case with our IHP.
So I'd say our 504 plan includes more than "health-related" accommodations. DD hasn't had an anaphylactic reaction at school, so the "health related" accommodations have been successful. But in the past those came at the expense of her "social", "emotional", "behavioral". Other goals/outcomes are addressed in her 504 plan now. Issues such as "self-advocacy" are included in her plan.
BTW, I remember there was a poster her a while back (Janet Laflamme, I think) who had an IHP with a box at the top that indicated her child was protected under Section 504. But the document itself was an IHP administered by the school nurse.
I look forward to MommaBear's opinion. I suspect that she would put forth that learning is always necessarily impacted.

Posted on: Wed, 02/01/2006 - 3:02am
Gail W's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by Gail W:
[b]I look forward to MommaBear's opinion. I suspect that she would put forth that learning is always necessarily impacted. [/b]
You got here first! LOL! I'm too slow MB!

Posted on: Wed, 02/01/2006 - 4:07am
notnutty's picture
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I understand what you are saying, but I still don't understand specifically how they can say an IHP is the same as a 504. We all know they are different of the reasons already given.
An IHP can be incorporated into a 504 plan...but that does not make an IHP by itself the same as a 504.
I would not have a problem with and IEP with an OHI designation...that to me is even better than a 504, but unlikely because my son does not have academic weaknesses. IEPs are generally to cover academic accommodations.
To restate:
"Many districts consider the IHP to be a 504 Plan in the cases where a student needs only the health-related accommodations outlined in the IHP to access education. The IHP then, is subject to the regulations of Section 504."
I don't understand how they can state that and IHP is subject to the regulation of a 504, UNLESS it is incorporated into a 504, but standing alone it is not the same.
Maybe I am getting too detailed. But I would hate for those responsible for taking care of our children to be given incorrect information...and therefore making it harder for us to get the 504 designation.
I don't want an IHP...I either want an IEP with OHI or a 504.
Still confused....
Donna

Posted on: Wed, 02/01/2006 - 4:54am
MommaBear's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by notnutty:
[b]
I would not have a problem with and IEP with an OHI designation...that to me is even better than a 504, but unlikely because my son does not have academic weaknesses. IEPs are generally to cover academic accommodations.
[/b]
warning: i have a big blue question mark above this post. It means, I don't know, I'm asking a question, I'm not sure, etc.....
Personally? I don't think one has to have an "academic weakness" to qualify for an OHI designation. Would only "learning" being affected by a disability be enough? Wouldn't a limitation of not having access to education (in this case [i]safe access[/i] due to a life threatening disability) need apply?
I mean, correct me if I'm wrong, but I'm under the impression that it is the obligation of a school district to prohibit attendance when the environment is [i]unsafe[/i] and make changes, [i]improvements[/i], repairs, or accommodations as necessary (homebound option if need be?) in order that access be provided.
And *that* if "learning is affected", and an IEP being the most [i]appropriate[/i] designation in such circumstances, yea...............if the condition could be addressed by either a 504 or an IEP, that the district would have the *right* to demand it be addressed under [i]an IEP[/i].
Possibly, even go to due process, (or as I was told on *another* IEP issue "state mediated intervention" not sure what that is or if it exists---not sure if it was done in the best interest of the child---or was a hollow threat???) ) to get a designation and documentation in order that needs be met....
....Needs of the district in order to provide for that child, and needs of child, in order that their best interests be determined and served [i]appropriately[/i], or limits and burden of obligation (or not) be determined, met, and resolved. I mean, where "Duty of Care" resides. That depending on the situation (or not) who needs to do what and where and when.
Tangent warning: I mean, as far as a districting possibly demanding an IEP over a 504 as being most appropriate, what is the argument for not allowing "privately schooled" persons to forgo the obligation of being taxed for "public schooling"? That society has an obligation to maintain school systems for *everyone*?? Sure, someone may [i]prefer[/i] a different designation, but what about the Big Picuture? Does every little bit that is provided under certain designations such as an IEP help the [i]maintain[/i] the school system in general? Not even sure how much money is provided to districts under IEP's, but I've been told there's a lot States don't use and send back every year. and I could have been told wrong. heard wrong. (where's that link to the money that school districts don't use each year???) And I've been told IEP funding is not that much. But hey, it's [i]something[/i]. (and I could be wrong there too. I mean, on what I've been told)
Odd, considering the increasing need for "individualization" and some school districts crying "poor mouth". Maybe it's not just the schools who are contributing to perpetuating this happenstance. If it exists.
What if everyone decided they didn't want cerain "labels" but wanted the accomodation? Or even just some. KWIM?
SOMEBODY. HELP ME. AM I WAY OFF? DO I MISUNDERSTAND???
Don't take this as advice, it's not meant that way. I am unsure.
[i]I am not offering advice in any manner or form. I am not qualified nor do I understand these things in such a way that I could offer advice. I'm only asking. I don't know. This is just my limited understanding, if I understand at all. [/i]
[This message has been edited by MommaBear (edited February 01, 2006).]

Posted on: Wed, 02/01/2006 - 5:07am
MommaBear's picture
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oh, and my post might be a "U.S." thing. Who knows.

Posted on: Wed, 02/01/2006 - 6:20am
notnutty's picture
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From Allergysupport.org:
If a particular disability does not affect a child

Posted on: Wed, 02/01/2006 - 7:14am
Gail W's picture
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Joined: 12/06/2001 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by notnutty:
[b]Is there a reason a parent would not want IEP if that is how the school wants to handle it?[/b]
I can't think of a reason. If my school district would have offered me an IEP for her PA, I would have gladly accepted it. (BTW, my PA DD has an IEP for her learning disability and a 504 plan for her PA.)
I think that, in general, it's harder to make the case for an IEP for a child w/ PA. But hey, MommaBear did it. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Wed, 02/01/2006 - 7:53am
MommaBear's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by notnutty:
[b]From Allergysupport.org:
If a particular disability does not affect a child

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