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Posted on: Mon, 02/05/2007 - 8:24am
chanda4's picture
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Joined: 12/14/2006 - 09:00

Since Nathan died of peanut exposure and possibly a peanut ban at his school *might* have saved his life. Would that have been beneficial if Sabrina's school would have had ban on milk???
I can see, honestly how a ban would be best, but it can't be the answer to everything, for everybody. If there is a ban on one thing, that doesn't protect everybody. I still don't agree with bans....totally my opinion here.
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Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)

Posted on: Mon, 02/05/2007 - 8:27am
Sarahb's picture
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Joined: 01/22/2007 - 09:00

His school is peanut free now.
Why do we have to wait for a tragedy to make sensable changes? Why does every law have a name attached to it?

Posted on: Mon, 02/05/2007 - 8:36am
chanda4's picture
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Joined: 12/14/2006 - 09:00

I said that same thing to our school and district(just when getting the lunchroom changes made, no ban) but I said to them
"My worst fear is that someday there will be a Jake's Law(which would mean something wasn't done until it was *too late*)....that is why I want to do this now, before something very serious and very scary happens to my son. Often people wait until something serious or deadly has happened to start making changes, I want to start NOW."
I am happy with the lunchroom set up for now. They heard me and made a change. But I agree...every sitation is different.
------------------
Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)

Posted on: Mon, 02/05/2007 - 9:08am
BriandBrinasmom's picture
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Joined: 10/20/2006 - 09:00

Asking how you'd reactive if you were inconvenienced by another child's allergy is an interesting shoe-on-the-other-foot scenario... To paraphrase (actually, selectly quote) what Nicole and Sarah said on the milk ban thing:
Nicole: you would support it if it was necessary and if the school decided it was necessary for a child.
So there is a continuum here. The severity of a child's reaction does get factored in when an uninvolved parent like you makes a decision to support a ban like this. The parent's belief that their child is sufficiently allergic is not enough for you to take it seriously.
Should a parent have to provide evidence of anaphylaxis to obtain a peanut ban? Conversely, is it o.k. to advocate for a peanut ban for your child, even if there is no history of anaphylaxis?
I hear on this board all the time that you cannot judge the severity of a reaction by past reaction, that every reaction has the potential to be severe, etc. etc. So how do uninvolved parents and the school judge whether an allergy is "severe" enough to require a ban?
Sarah: you would not support it because peanuts are not a staple in our diet and it makes sense to ban them for safety reasons; milk on the other hand is a staple and reactions are typically less life threatening. Banning peanuts [but not eggs, or milk, or wheat] will probably help more people than the number of people who will feel put out by it.
You're basically saying that the overall convenience for the group is a factor in whether parents will support a ban, and that uninvolved parents will consider "the good of the whole" over the inconvenient to their child.
But isn't avoidance behavior always going to be too inconvenient for a sub-segment of parents? We've all experience the "but little Susie won't eat anything else but peanut butter in her lunch" mother. Do those of you with "peanut-free" schools really think these parents aren't in your schools, and that they aren't sending peanut butter because of their commitment to the common good?

Posted on: Mon, 02/05/2007 - 9:15am
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by BriandBrinasmom:
[b]You're basically saying that the overall convenience for the group is a factor in whether parents will support a ban, and that uninvolved parents will consider "the good of the whole" over the inconvenient to their child.
[/b]
What exactly is being said about "univolved parents"? I'm not understanding. Could you be more clear?

Posted on: Mon, 02/05/2007 - 9:30am
Sarahb's picture
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Joined: 01/22/2007 - 09:00

I don't really give a rats @ss about little Suzie. And yes her mother is my school. I have already heard from her and they haven't even announced the ban yet....but she can smell it coming and she's right. The signs have been laminated, the flyers have been printed, the peanut butter is about to hit the fan! I'm ready for it.
Any logical or compassionate person will get over the fact that Suzie has to find something else to eat for lunch. Her mother might not be logical but the teachers and administrators are.
And should the circumstances for milk, wheat, egg, soy etc become as previlant as peanut then I would certainly support it.
Frankly I think too many of us are just accustomed to trying to fit in or not make a fuss.....I think we need to make a fuss. DS wont fit in sitting at a special table, or with pages of exceptions on how he is to be treated, etc.
Just outlaw nuts in school.
How hard is that? It's simple and common sense to me. What's the harm? Who is hurt? PEANUTS ARE A CONDIMENT!
Take one allergen at a time. Each one on thier own merits so to speak. To me the "slippery slope" arguement is a cop out.
I hope I haven't offended anyone, perhaps I should go to the gym and work out some of this repressed anger. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Mon, 02/05/2007 - 9:38am
Sarahb's picture
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Joined: 01/22/2007 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by BriandBrinasmom:
[b]
You're basically saying that the overall convenience for the group is a factor in whether parents will support a ban, and that uninvolved parents will consider "the good of the whole" over the inconvenient to their child.
Not convenience.....SAFETY! PROTECTION! LIFE! PRESERVATION!
Quote:But isn't avoidance behavior always going to be too inconvenient for a sub-segment of parents? We've all experience the "but little Susie won't eat anything else but peanut butter in her lunch" mother. Do those of you with "peanut-free" schools really think these parents aren't in your schools, and that they aren't sending peanut butter because of their commitment to the common good?[/b]
Yes and that's why we have to do the same things that we would anyway. Send in our own food, read labels, provide snacks, wipe down, train teachers, stay involved, etc. It's not a license to forget. It's not a false sense of security.

Posted on: Mon, 02/05/2007 - 9:51am
AuntAmanda's picture
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Joined: 01/20/2007 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by chanda4:
[b]well, don't be mad, but I have been told point blank that our district will not go nut-free because of liability issues and fear of being sued. If they were to announce nut-free and my son had a reaction...do you think it is my right to sue?? Most people would, honeslty I don't know, if he died...most liekly I would. So I can see why they wouldn't take that responsibility, they should, but they wouldn't because of sue-happy folks out there. It's sad.
And being a mother of a multiple food allergy child, eggs and milk(common lunch room foods) are just as serious as my sons peanut and tree nut allergies. So if milk could kill my son, would I have the right to ask for a ban as well??? Or eggs??? Our school serves all of the above.
Don't mean to be a jerk here either....just trying to point out different perspectives...things I think about often.
[/b]
Chandra,
I can't imagine the frustrations you're going through with this horrible school district in your area. But I think you (and possibly some of the posters here) are looking at sueing from the wrong POV.
Perhaps it would be a POSITIVE thing and would it really have to wait until he died? Could you not sue them now??
The mother for the little girl who died from drinking hot coca at the Girl Scout's event should SUE the Girl Scouts. Plain and simple. Not for the money. But for the publicity. It would bring awareness to Food Allegies. To the severity of them, to the consequences of ignorance. And it would force other large organizations who interact with children (HOPEFULLY churches, daycares, camps, and so forth) to become scared enough to somehow educate themselves on their own about Food Allergies to atleast take the basic precautions to protect children in the future.
Sue happy? Sure there are ignorant, narrow minded, small people in the world who are just looking for the next fast paycheck. But in cases like these, SUE THEM and make a big deal out of it. Bring all the attention you can to the cause and make people pay attention. I cannot believe how much people do NOT pay attention, how little they care, or how much they feel it is an inconvience.
/rant

Posted on: Mon, 02/05/2007 - 10:25am
BriandBrinasmom's picture
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Joined: 10/20/2006 - 09:00

Sarah, my point was that "it's all about my kid" for all of us. You and Nicole reacted to me in exactly the way other parents will react to you. They will justify their defiance of the ban by saying the equivalent of "the kid's not that allergic anyway - the mom picks the cheese off the pizza." They will say "there are only a few peanut kids in the world - why should we change our behavior for those few?"
People are not logical. They are often not compassionate. They're going to "protect" their kids, even if it's over something silly like the right to eat a condiment. You think teachers and administrators can make them change? All of them?
I'm not talking about "trying to fit in" or about "not making a fuss." I'm saying that peanut bans don't work, even when parents think they do. Parents who think they have a peanut-free school do not have a peanut free school - and it's more dangerous for their children because they believe it's peanut-free.
[This message has been edited by BriandBrinasmom (edited February 05, 2007).]

Posted on: Mon, 02/05/2007 - 10:27am
JRsMami's picture
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Joined: 08/08/2005 - 09:00

I think the whole point here that is being forgotten is to "reduce the risk".
If a 504 is sufficient for some individuals and they are not facing reoccurring contact reactions, then great. You still never get to sit back & relax and not worry, instead you constantly keep up your guard and add to the 504 any new risks.
As for those who have a 504 but it doesn't quite resolve all issues of concern - then perhaps a Ban (or schoolwide involvement) is necessary IN ADDITION to the 504 and it's still very involved accomodations. And once again, there is no sitting back & relaxing because life/accidents happen. "False sense of security" is a parent who thinks at anytime that anything is full proof and that they can relax. No- instead we continue to observe, learn, educate. and be proactive & reactive without rest for the sake of our childs life - with or without a ban.
Who thinks about lawsuits when asking this of a school? We think about trying our damn best to keep our child safe and alive while sending them off to the hands of others but not wanting them to be limited to sitting on the sidelines alone.
My idea for a ban is not to prevent my child from eating a PB product... that's my job by educating him and with his 504 to make sure proper label checking is taking place. Instead a ban would be to reduce the amount of PB residue that finds it's way throughout the schools common areas. Milk & egg just don't stick like PB does. I don't care if kids come in with M&M's - I just do not want my DS's teacher using it as a hands-on math tool in his class.
If a child's 504 is not enough, then maybe a ban will be.
Just my Opinion.

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