Naive question re: schools and peanutfree issue

Posted on: Fri, 02/02/2007 - 10:55am
KateDe's picture
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Why would a public school not want to be nutfree?

I read a few things here and there on this board that the peanut lobby is strong. Really? If so how does that affect public schools?

I don't think our public schools are peanut free. My son is still young and not yet in school. He is in preschool and they are peanutfree and changing to that was a none issue. The owner is very understanding.

However, I wonder what awaits us down the road.

Posted on: Fri, 02/02/2007 - 11:02am
KateDe's picture
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none issue... that would be nonissue if that is even a word. I am useless without an edit feature.

Posted on: Fri, 02/02/2007 - 11:04am
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they are NOT peanut-free(at least where we are)....mostly(I assume) because of the *rights* of those who want to eat peanuts....I hear that way more then I care to.
In the school section of this site, they talk alot oabout a 504..I am doing this at the moment, just to get his room nut-free....but I've been warned I will have a fight on my hands to do so.
------------------
Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)

Posted on: Fri, 02/02/2007 - 11:09am
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Thanks! I didn't see the school section. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Fri, 02/02/2007 - 11:17am
chanda4's picture
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KateDe...also I wanted to share. We recently got our school to make the kids that bring cold lunch or eat the pb&j's the school serves, to have them all sit at one table and wash their hands after lunch....youu should have seen the uproar and outraged parents that caused! The upset parents even called the local news to say it was segregation....it was rediculous! So I imagine, if they actually *tried* to make the school nut-free...it would be absolutly a fight.
Plus, if you ban one food, like nuts...what abotu those allergic to milk....it becomes an endless cycle(and we have multiple foods, but I can understand how banning everythign isn't the answer). HUGS
------------------
Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)

Posted on: Fri, 02/02/2007 - 12:12pm
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Basically because it creates conflict with the parents that scream their kids "only" eat PB&J and have the 'right' to eat whatever they want etc. There have been full blown wars in school districts that have gone peanut/nut free.
If I were an administrator, I'd want to do the SAFEST thing and reduce risk in my school. Many schools have banned peanuts/nuts with success (some in the US, many in Canada, and many preschools everywhere). But unfortunately, FAAN is not helping by making statements that "a peanut ban results in a false sense of security".

Posted on: Fri, 02/02/2007 - 12:41pm
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Obviously all of us here have a personal connection to peanut allergies, and obviously it's a big deal to all of us. Many people on this board also have many other food allergies. I'd be interested to hear what they have to say about peanut bans. I know a couple of people whose children have multiple food allergies. They both feel that they'd like to remove as many allergens as possible from their child's environment, but they don't view peanuts as any riskier to their children than anything else to which their kids are anaphylactic.
Also, I remember what one person told me whose child is allergic to a lot of foods (I think it's around 22!). Peanut butter is one of the few foods that he can bring to school. If his school had a peanut ban, it would be really hard for him.

Posted on: Fri, 02/02/2007 - 12:54pm
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"Basically because it creates conflict with the parents that scream their kids "only" eat PB&J and have the 'right' to eat whatever they want etc"
That's what I don't understand. I try to get into a person like that's mindset and I can't. Again... I'm naive. But I would never feel comfortable knowing that my child were bringing something to school that could possibly harm another child.

Posted on: Fri, 02/02/2007 - 2:19pm
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Quote:That's what I don't understand. I try to get into a person like that's mindset and I can't. Again... I'm naive. But I would never feel comfortable knowing that my child were bringing something to school that could possibly harm another child. [/B]
I'm totally with you, but where do we draw the line? If there are students in a school who are anaphylactic to peanuts, tree nuts, dairy, eggs, wheat, sesame, and who knows what else, we can't ban all of those things. (I'm not saying one person is allergic to all of those things, but I'm saying the total list of allergens for everyone in the school).

Posted on: Fri, 02/02/2007 - 3:29pm
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Quote:Originally posted by KateDe:
[b]none issue... that would be nonissue if that is even a word. I am useless without an edit feature. [/b]
You can edit your own posts by clicking on the little pencil and paper icon above the text.
Cathy

Posted on: Fri, 02/02/2007 - 4:21pm
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Had to delete
[This message has been edited by NicoleinNH (edited June 10, 2007).]

Posted on: Fri, 02/02/2007 - 10:25pm
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I have heard of school districts volunteering to go peanut-free... Wow. Why not where I live?
I am curious to know if anyone was successful asking for a school to go peanut free... anyone out there??
For those who have asked but have not received PF schools... do you still have limits set for your child that you would disregard if the school went peanut-free?? (i.e.- playing on playgound equip., riding school bus for field trips, attending classes that include substitues, sitting with class for lunch rather than the segregated PF table across the cafeteria????)

Posted on: Fri, 02/02/2007 - 11:59pm
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we talk about this topic alot in the schools forum. Many of us have or are thinking about drafting up a 504 to protect our allergy children. I am in the process myself right now. A 504 is a legal document drafted up by the school(after qualifying) and you can touch on everything from teh bus ride to school, to rules about food in the classroom, to where they sit in an assembly etc...) it's very detailed, just for that child.
When my son first started kindergarten at school, I was focused on getting the pb out of the lunchroom and possibly out of the school. But as I've grown on this journey....I've come to realize, that I can't ban these foods for the rest of his life. At what point do we take self responsibility and use it to teach our kids to be safe in a world that isn't?? We also have a boy allergic to multiple foods lots of meats, milk, veggies, wheat etc...) and he does need peanut butter, in his case, it is all he can eat safely...so who am I to take that away from him?? So we have it, now(at or school) that those eating pb eat at certain tables and those that can't, have their own p-free tables. They all wash their hands after lunch as well.
Another point that hit me, was we have multiple allergies in our family, so am I going to ban all those foods as well?? I need to draw the line somewhere. I can't expect a school to ban peanuts, tree nuts, eggs, milk, soy, chocolate, beef and pork....that's rediculous. And if they were to ban the peanuts...what about the milk, are those kids not worthy of a ban to protect them too???
The 504 will help in setting up some safe rules for each child. I am more worried about pb/nut/eggs being brought into the classroom(what should happen if they are). It's happened, after a field trip they all finished their lunch in the classroom, my son was sent to the principals office. To protect his right to be in class, his 504, in that situation, would ask that the class would need to finish their lunch in the lunchroom, using the peanut-tables for the pb-eaters and the peanut-free tables for my son.
When my 3yr old starts kindergarten, I will need to adjust the rules to fit him...with the milk, kindergarten has milk in class in the afternoon...so I need to think up a safe way for him to be apart of that...I don't think I would ask to ban it, maybe if they could go to the lunchroom during that time, may be sufficiant??
It's hard, you have to think of every situation, but also you need to consider others. It took me some time to come to grips with that, I have a right, they have a right....we have to find what works for everyone, safely.
I do think a ban would be nice, no worries etc....but I don't think it is the answer.
------------------
Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)
[This message has been edited by chanda4 (edited February 03, 2007).]

Posted on: Sat, 02/03/2007 - 12:20am
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[b]To protect his right to be in class, his 504, in that situation, would ask that the class would need to finish their lunch in the lunchroom, using the peanut-tables for the pb-eaters and the peanut-free tables for my son.[/b]
Chandra,
So you were successful with having PB-eaters have their own segregated tables even tho their was such an uproar with the parents and news? Did you have the schools support?
We have adapted a 504 but we have had a few issues that were not resolved and instead compromised but not to our liking. One is the school was unable to enforce some type of handwashing policy for those children who do eat PB... which has set limits for my child to prevent contact reactions- such as not having access to playground equip. It's a compromise in the sense it goes against what our 504 protects us from... but we haven't been able to come up with another solution.
[b]When my 3yr old starts kindergarten, I will need to adjust the rules to fit him...with the milk, kindergarten has milk in class in the afternoon...so I need to think up a safe way for him to be apart of that...I don't think I would ask to ban it, maybe if they could go to the lunchroom during that time, may be sufficiant??[/b]
Perhaps suggesting apple juice instead of milk can be an easy solution to this problem- a healthy alternative.
Are your child's milk & egg allergy life threatening as well? Do you worry about contact reactions with milk and egg like most do with peanut residue? That is my main concern with school's choice to allow PB is the residue left behind that my child can pick up on so easily.
thanks for your feedback.
[This message has been edited by JRsMami (edited February 03, 2007).]

Posted on: Sat, 02/03/2007 - 12:30am
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JRsMami....
here is the link to the story. The *outraged* parents called the news station to complain, I think the news did a good job covering our side of the story(since non of the outraged parents would go on camera)....
[url="http://www.thedenverchannel.com/education/10512488/detail.html"]http://www.thedenverchannel.com/education/10512488/detail.html[/url]
(watch the video off to the right)
As for the egg allergy, my son Jake(in Kindergarten) his is anapylaxic(his neck squeezes tight from batter, so most likely just raw egg...but I keep him away form all). As for the milk in the younger ones...as far as I know, Carson is not, but I am unsure. Savannah is, her mouth, neck swelled up and were covered in hives when some formula dripped down her chin.
EDIT- had to add, both kids have gotten hives when a family member drank milk and then kissed them, so they are both contact sensitive. But if kids drank it at lunch, I would just ask if they could wash their hands after...just like we did with the peanutbutter.
As far as what to do once they are in school. I don't want to take the milk away from those students that can drink it, we just need to decide on a safe way of doing it(like going to the lunchroom and sitting at designated tables vs all sitting together on the rug in class) I would actually send my son his rice milk, rather then drinking juice, I am not a big fan of juice(they can have one juice a day, but I push water most the time).
But anyways...we have multiple allergies, I don't want a ban. I just read in another thread(don't remember the name) but they were very passionate(edit, spelling, I can't do it!) about the school banning peanuts. But what about the kids allergic to eggs, milk, I know a girl anaphylaxic to wheat...what if the school banned everything that could cause death??
Where do we draw the line???
------------------
Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)
[This message has been edited by chanda4 (edited February 03, 2007).]
[This message has been edited by chanda4 (edited February 03, 2007).]
[This message has been edited by chanda4 (edited February 03, 2007).]

Posted on: Sat, 02/03/2007 - 5:13am
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Hi -
We just found out that my kindergarten daughter is PA. I am the teacher in the kinder class next to hers. My principal and staff immediately said "lets go peanut-free". We have posted the signs and will send out letters to the community on Monday. Food services will not send peanut butter or peanut products any longer. I am curious to see what response we get. My mom said to prepare for media. I say bring it on. I have a great relationship with parents in the building and if any are offended, I am prepared to offer an explanation of how my duty involves protecting all children, I would do this if it wasn't my child with the allergy.
Amy
ps. I will also do a 504 by the end of the school year to ensure that these measure continue throughout her schooling (proncipal and staff will likely change some time)

Posted on: Sat, 02/03/2007 - 5:49am
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Well Amy I think that is great. But you know, it just reinforces my view on this..."people will only make changes if it effects themself".
I assume there are other PA children in your school, but did they finally decide to go peanut free because a teachers child(yours) was affected? Why didn't they before? (I hope I don't sound rude....just soemthing I've noticed)
I am glad you are prepared for the backlash...there will be a ton of it. You'll hear allt he *my kids have aright to eat peanut-butter*. In my post above(I think this thread, with the link to the video from the local news) parents were outraged because we asked kids to sit at a table....they can still bring peanut butter, we just ask they sit at the cold lunch table...parents and students flipped out, over something so stupid in my opnion!
Good luck, hope it goes smoothly. And interesting to know a teacher is also considering doign a 504, that makes me feel good about my decision to do one. And not to sound thankful your child is PA...but woulnd't it be nice to find a teacher, or principal with such a personal experience with peanut allergies...you *get it*, most don't! Good luck [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)

Posted on: Sat, 02/03/2007 - 6:07am
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Quote:Originally posted by chanda4:
[b]they are NOT peanut-free(at least where we are)....mostly(I assume) because of the *rights* of those who want to eat peanuts....I hear that way more then I care to.
In the school section of this site, they talk alot oabout a 504..I am doing this at the moment, just to get his room nut-free....but I've been warned I will have a fight on my hands to do so.
[/b]
That's just HORRIBLE! Are people really that stupid and self centered???? They won't let you have a nut free class room???

Posted on: Sat, 02/03/2007 - 6:17am
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auntAmanda...
sorry for all my typ-o's when you quoted me, LOL!!! But no, my sons room is NOT nut free. The teacher can ask parents to please consider Jake when they bring treats, btu if a parent wanted to bring in peanut butter cookies, the teacher could NOT turn them away. They will NOT ban a food. I understand that, I do. I am doign the 504 because I want *in writing* what should be done if that parents does bring in peanut butter cookies. As it stands, they send Jake to the office. Which I HATE! In the 504 I am going to state, that if peanuts/nuts are brought into the classroom, the whole class needs to go down to the lunchroom, Jake can sit at his safe table and eat his safe snack, while the other kids eat their cookies. After, they wash their hands and head back to class. That is fine with me...that way both sides win...right??!!!
------------------
Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)

Posted on: Sat, 02/03/2007 - 6:17am
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Quote:Originally posted by Mookie86:
[b]Also, I remember what one person told me whose child is allergic to a lot of foods (I think it's around 22!). Peanut butter is one of the few foods that he can bring to school. If his school had a peanut ban, it would be really hard for him.
[/b]
I don't think a ban so much, but the segragation seems like a good idea. I am appalled that the parents (that Chandra mentioned) threw such a tantrum! What kind of example are they setting for their kids?
But the segregation - something could always go wrong, you know? I'm not sure what the best answer is.
I read on FAAN recently that they are now accepting application or nominations for schools to be trained for Food Allergies. Anyone had this occur at their school? How does this work? Do you think maybe THIS would help at all?
[url="http://www.foodallergy.org/sfap/index.php"]Here is the information if anyone wants to nominate their school![/url]
[This message has been edited by AuntAmanda (edited February 03, 2007).]

Posted on: Sat, 02/03/2007 - 6:25am
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Quote:Originally posted by chanda4:
[b]auntAmanda...
sorry for all my typ-o's when you quoted me, LOL!!! But no, my sons room is NOT nut free. The teacher can ask parents to please consider Jake when they bring treats, btu if a parent wanted to bring in peanut butter cookies, the teacher could NOT turn them away. They will NOT ban a food. I understand that, I do. I am doign the 504 because I want *in writing* what should be done if that parents does bring in peanut butter cookies. As it stands, they send Jake to the office. Which I HATE! In the 504 I am going to state, that if peanuts/nuts are brought into the classroom, the whole class needs to go down to the lunchroom, Jake can sit at his safe table and eat his safe snack, while the other kids eat their cookies. After, they wash their hands and head back to class. That is fine with me...that way both sides win...right??!!!
[/b]
Don't worry about typos - my typing is horrible! :P
But that is just horrible! They send him to the office and snack in the classroom with peanut butter cookies or whatnot? Do they scrub down the room before he comes back?
Please excuse my current anger issues today on the board - I'm just beyond upset about how people seem to be treating kids with food allergies. Like it's not something THEY need to deal with. I'm not even a parent and it's BEYOND frustrating for me right now! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img]
I SO hope my nephew NEVER goes through anything like this! He's not even 2 yet, so his parents don't have to think about it yet, but still, the knowledge that there are parents out there that are so selfish.
Ah! I'll be praying that your 504 ppwk goes through. Really, maybe instead of a ban, there should just be a nut room or something, you know? And that way, there is a room just for kids to eat their PB sandwiches that they just CANNOT live without. :P

Posted on: Sat, 02/03/2007 - 6:40am
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AuntAmanda...you'll love this one...I nominated my school. But you have to print out the letter and give it to the principal, they have to follow through to receive the info....ours wouldn't! I wish FAAN would just mail it to them reguardless....
------------------
Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)

Posted on: Sat, 02/03/2007 - 6:45am
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Quote:Originally posted by chanda4:
[b]AuntAmanda...you'll love this one...I nominated my school. But you have to print out the letter and give it to the principal, they have to follow through to receive the info....ours wouldn't! I wish FAAN would just mail it to them reguardless....
[/b]
Is there a reason that the principal wouldn't?

Posted on: Sat, 02/03/2007 - 7:03am
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No, no valid reason. She just said she would need to check with the district before moving forward...and I never followed up(that was back in Oct). In this situation, it would be best if FAAN would just mail it to them anyways!!
------------------
Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)

Posted on: Sun, 02/04/2007 - 6:10am
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Chanda -
Actually, my daughter IS the first child that I know about in our school. Strange, huh. Maybe others will come forward after the letter goes out. An interesting question I have is that we are an inner city school that caters to the foreign language speakers. We have such a mix of city kids, actually Eden is in the white minority. I don't know if cultural background has ANYTHING at all to do with this allergy, but that could explain why there are no others at her school. Also, being in a high poverty school has it's advantages. The families really look out for each others kids and they typically don't have the "entitlement attitude" that the middle/upper class schools do. In other words, they might NOT challenge this at all.
As far as looking out for your own, I agree wholeheartedly. Maybe it was meant to be that it was MY child to spearhead this change (I wish it was nobody's kid). As from a teacher's standpoint, I have been teaching 8 years and NEVER had a peanut allergic child in my classroom (city school, once again????) I keep asking myself how I would respond if it weren't my child. I would like to say that I would feel the same, but inside that is just not true. I can't imagine, however, not wanting the school peanut free. I would never want to accidentally cause ANY harm to anyone (especially my students)and removing peanuts is such a minor inconvenience. Shame on any teachers who are not 100% supportive!!!!
Amy (I don't usually write this much but we are under a blizzard here in Michigan)

Posted on: Mon, 02/05/2007 - 3:21am
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In response to the mom who had the news involved in segregation issue of the non-pa children.... I wish I would of thought of bringing the media into it when my now 14 year old son was in 1st grade and we had to deal with this same issue!!!!! Only there answer was to segregate HIM not anyone else. So for five years, despite my attempts and letters to parents asking for their child to be peanut free to sit with him, my son was moved to the back of the cafeteria at a table all by himself for lunch. And no one could be forced to wash their hands due to "what if some child is allergic to the contents of the wipes and there is not time to have that many children go to the washroom before going to the playground." We are in a very large school district. May I just say, this has had a very serious and lasting effect on my son with personal issues and to this day denial of the seriousness of the life threatening allergy he will live with for the rest of his life.
I read all your discussions and first I commend all of you for being so informed and involved with what is going on. Our son is about to enter high school, and once again, just like when he started 1st grade, I am scared for him. It is sooo big and so much more non-controlled environment. I do not have a 504 and don't really even know how to go about getting one at this point or if I even can. The 504 mainly just puts responsibility of protection on the school, right? You could have one and still not be followed so it really doesn't give ensurance of safety, just somewhere to put or someone to hold responsible if it doesn't or isn't.
We have been very fortunate!!!! Thanks to God! He had one incident on the playground in grade school and one caused by my stupidity in elem. and none since then. He is an eighth grader now and sits at a table in the front of the cafeteria that is designated for him to be peanut free, but the cafe does not serve pbj anymore but they do have snacks with peanuts in it because peanuts are "healthy". We have found that most jr. high students have outgrown the pbj addiction for lunch, so not as many bring it in either, so he has had multiple children sitting with him and seems to be fine. But he refused to carry around his epi-pens for fear of being seen as different like he was in elementary school. He now has to have two epi-pens as one will not do him any good after his last episode.
Sorry I know I am rambling, but new here and looking for some good advise or someone to talk to who knows what I can or should do here. My son is very athletic and I know could come into contact with it more readily in high school. (Girls too!!!! the whole kissing thing really freaks me out!) Boys eat a quick peanut snack for energy in sports all the time. How can I protect him without him feeling "different". He still has some kids who were in grade school with him that make fun of him, who are in high school.
Thanks for letting me ramble!! Sorry and kuddos to all of you for being so on top of it at such a young age. He is our only with allergies and we are just plain rookies at this.

Posted on: Mon, 02/05/2007 - 4:10am
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My son is 12 in a few days and allergic to peanuts, milk, soy, beans and peas. My husband and I do not believe in peanut-free schools, and we are not just "parroting the US stance" as someone said...we've come to that through experience.
My son's preschool was "peanut-free" - at their request, not ours. His grade school had "nut-free" classrooms. We found two things:
1) Parents who wanted to comply with the ban did not understand enough *to* comply. Are plain M&Ms "peanut-free"? They are to most parents.
2) There was a small sub-segment of parents who would cheat despite the ban, and send peanut-butter on field trips or to the classroom. My son had a minor reaction on a field trip one time that we think may have been attributed to a child who ate peanut butter and then wrestled afterward with him during a game.
We tell our son that he needs to be responsible for himself, despite the presence of peanuts and milk all around him, and we believe he is actually safer knowing "the snakes are there" than thinking they're not, and then being surprised when they bite him.

Posted on: Mon, 02/05/2007 - 4:20am
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athletemom...over in the *schools* section of this forum there is lots of info about the 504's...even at high school level. Might be worth your time to read through alot of that before giving up. I am just starting mine, for Kindergarten...but the 504 info in the schools section has been a life saver!!! Good luck!!
briandbrismom....I agree with you here. I am trying to teach my son to be aware of him self...and not depending on bans to do it for him. I think a ban would work against us, I am in the mind-set of they do create false sense of security...for me they would, becuase I am that type of person. Anyways....I agree with you here.
------------------
Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)
[This message has been edited by chanda4 (edited February 05, 2007).]

Posted on: Mon, 02/05/2007 - 4:23am
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One other comment about why a school would not want to go peanut-free...then they assume liability for enforcing the ban, which is virtually impossible. The same parents who ask for the ban would turn around and sue the school district when it doesn't work.
While I think it's amusing to blame the peanut lobby, I don't think it has a thing to do with the situation in our schools. Plain human selfishness is far more the issue. Can you imagine the outcry if I had pressed for a milk ban at my son's school? Most of you wouldn't support it, and you understand the issues involved. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/redface.gif[/img](

Posted on: Mon, 02/05/2007 - 4:47am
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Had to go POOF
[This message has been edited by NicoleinNH (edited June 10, 2007).]

Posted on: Mon, 02/05/2007 - 4:54am
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Another naive question. School aged kids and anaphylaxis triggers... isn't it just peanuts/treenuts & shellfish? Doesn't the milk allergy "calm down" for lack of better words?

Posted on: Mon, 02/05/2007 - 5:02am
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well, don't be mad, but I have been told point blank that our district will not go nut-free because of liability issues and fear of being sued. If they were to announce nut-free and my son had a reaction...do you think it is my right to sue?? Most people would, honeslty I don't know, if he died...most liekly I would. So I can see why they wouldn't take that responsibility, they should, but they wouldn't because of sue-happy folks out there. It's sad.
And being a mother of a multiple food allergy child, eggs and milk(common lunch room foods) are just as serious as my sons peanut and tree nut allergies. So if milk could kill my son, would I have the right to ask for a ban as well??? Or eggs??? Our school serves all of the above.
Don't mean to be a jerk here either....just trying to point out different perspectives...things I think about often.
------------------
Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)
[This message has been edited by chanda4 (edited February 05, 2007).]

Posted on: Mon, 02/05/2007 - 5:53am
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POOF
[This message has been edited by NicoleinNH (edited June 10, 2007).]

Posted on: Mon, 02/05/2007 - 5:58am
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Quote:Originally posted by BriandBrinasmom:
My son's preschool was "peanut-free" - at their request, not ours. His grade school had "nut-free" classrooms. We found two things:
1) Parents who wanted to comply with the ban did not understand enough *to* comply. Are plain M&Ms "peanut-free"? They are to most parents.
Just like a parent of a child with allergies these parents need to be educated. It's not rocket science to figure out the first few layers of reading labels. I would not let them feed my son but I feel better knowing that the food they send for theirs has a higher likelyhood of NOT containing peanuts.
Quote:2) There was a small sub-segment of parents who would cheat despite the ban, and send peanut-butter on field trips or to the classroom. My son had a minor reaction on a field trip one time that we think may have been attributed to a child who ate peanut butter and then wrestled afterward with him during a game.
We tell our son that he needs to be responsible for himself, despite the presence of peanuts and milk all around him, and we believe he is actually safer knowing "the snakes are there" than thinking they're not, and then being surprised when they bite him.
I will tell my son the same thing but I will also help him by advocating for the safest possible environment. It's really not a lot to ask of people and as a community it's something that people should be happy to do. Do I expect them to be perfect? No. They can't figure out how drive in a one way circle....but if 80% of them do a halfway decent job then my son will be safer.
No false sense of security here.

Posted on: Mon, 02/05/2007 - 5:59am
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My point was if the school is labeld peanut-free wouldn't you have more of a right to sue them....then if is wasn't, just normal everyday school??? That's all I was pointing out....
if our school was NOT peanut free and he died....I would have a hard time making a case proving they did something wrong. But if it were peanut-free and he died.....it is obviously their fault.....
I am just repeating what they told me, sorry to sound stupid here.
------------------
Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)

Posted on: Mon, 02/05/2007 - 6:02am
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Quote:Originally posted by NicoleinNH:
[b] Avoiding to do something that is necessary does not take away liability.
[/b]
Yup. ITA.
off topic - NH is one of my favorite states...I used to go up there as kid in the Grantham/Sunapee area! Fun times.

Posted on: Mon, 02/05/2007 - 6:18am
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Quote:Originally posted by chanda4:
[b]My point was if the school is labeld peanut-free wouldn't you have more of a right to sue them....then if is wasn't, just normal everyday school??? That's all I was pointing out....
if our school was NOT peanut free and he died....I would have a hard time making a case proving they did something wrong. But if it were peanut-free and he died.....it is obviously their fault.....
I am just repeating what they told me, sorry to sound stupid here.
[/b]
Chanda - I am not a laywer but I'll tell you that you can sue anyone for anything at anytime. If a school told me what yours did my response would be very aggressive because it sounds to me like they are caring more about law suits than protecting children.
From reading your other posts..my thoughts are that it would be easier for them to enforce a nut ban than segregating lunch tables, washing hands, etc. It seems to me that they have more rules to follow, more ways for the system to break down by not going nut free.
As for a case, and law, it all just depends on how a judge sees things. I am VERY new to the allergy world but I can't imagine that a judge would think that "peanut free" gave a guarantee of 100% no nut residue ever anywhere. I think there are SIMPLE ways for your school to avoid such a problem.
I understand that you don't want them to go nut free and I respect your opinion but if they started talking legalease to me...they would get it right back and then some.
[This message has been edited by Sarahb (edited February 05, 2007).]

Posted on: Mon, 02/05/2007 - 6:21am
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Quote:Originally posted by NicoleinNH:
[b]Chanda-Do you honestly think that a parent who loses a child and the death was preventable is "sue-happy"?!!! Are you kidding me!?
[/b]
dying falling down stairs is preventable. simply don't build a building with stairs...
So. Personally I don't think the schools have a responsibility to "prevent" an exposure by declaring their entire school "_____-free/avoidant" of [i]any[/i] allergen. It caters too specifically to one need. Declaring a [i]classroom[/i] "peanut avoidant". Sure. Why not? [i]Avoid[/i]. Room for error, I assume.
But better then, to declare the classroom [i]food free[/i], don't ya think? Then it works for everyone. Eat where eating is necessary. Now, in that situation, for instance, if a person needs glucose for low blood sugar, I think asking them at that moment of crisis, to find an "eating area" is obnoxious and totally self centered. My son can leave the room if something poses a threat to him in that situation. It's called "common sense". A teacher can remove him if he's not of the age or cognition to add it up. My son (or myself) asserting his "rights" at that point is ridiculous. Everyone needs to bend a bit or the whole thing is going to collapse on itself, don't ya think?
It's like [i]handwashing[/i]. Good for [i]everyone[/i]. Universal [i]prevention[/i]. Start adding up every individual foible, and pretty soon, [i]no one is going to be getting anything[/i].
And, btw, the OT is talking about [i]food[/i] as part of an oral sensory diet [i]at school[/i], aside from lunch. I know for a fact, unless it is one of his food [i]preferences[/i] it's not going to work. So, I can very well see another child needing peanut butter for a similiar break. What am I going to do? Change the school to suit my child's needs? Make it revolve around him? Don't think it's going to happen, even if that's how I would [i]want[/i] to invest in my child.
We recently had to incorporate multiple sensory breaks into his day. (first grade) I nearly forgot he had an allergy. So, I can very well see another mother putting their own child's needs first, especially when it came to something that is normally harmless, food. The fact some foods have the potential to harm my child really doesn't mean the entire school should be required to make that effort. (For lack of better words.) Honestly? When the school board, the band fundraiser volunteers, student council sales, hot lunch, candy apple, schwann sales, dippin dots, and holiday committees (as well as other individuals/organizations who donate foods for free as treats) and Lord knows what other power tripping individuals who are getting through the grapevine their choices for the entire school center around your child (and it won't necessarily be other food allergic children unless possibly their parents have made themselves painfully obvious in their demands of "accommodation"), you might change your mind. Especially if your child becomes [i]that noticed and catered to.[/i]
I had multiple opportunities to basically call the shots regarding such food items this year, (as our IEP for food allergies allowed) and wouldn't ya know, each and every time, I found myself backing down. Wanting to [i]avoid[/i] some other very real possible "harm" to my child.
no advice, just btdt.
ps...do you really believe that the only thing that would have prevented Nathan Walter's death (if it would have prevented it at all), would have been declaring the school "Peanut Free"?

Posted on: Mon, 02/05/2007 - 6:25am
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To me, when they say a peanut free school can cause a false sense of security, I think that could be true not so much for the parents but for the teachers/
administrators.
The elementary school where I sub is a peanut free school and just last week I had a good laugh when they sent home letters about bringing in snacks for the 100th day of school. Plain M&Ms were the top item. It clearly states on the bag "May Contain" but I guess when you are a "peanut free school" the "may contain" bags know to stay home!
I have only seen one letter announcing the peanut free ban back in September. Since then, there has been no other educational flyer, reminder or any other such communications home, as if by the one letter, everyone is in full compliance. (Granted, I am a sub and have not been in every single day, but often enough that I think I would know) In my opinion, it is a lawsuit waiting to happen.
My very best wishes to all, regardless of your opinion on the subject.

Posted on: Mon, 02/05/2007 - 6:27am
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....
[This message has been edited by NicoleinNH (edited June 10, 2007).]

Posted on: Mon, 02/05/2007 - 6:31am
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Thanks Sarah, I just ask lots of questions, sorry, sometimes they aren't the *right* questions people want asked.
I know for our school to go nut free, it would be nice, it would. But I don't see it necessary. The lunchroom as it stands, it actually one of the safest places in the school as we speak...his classroom, whole other story(nuts still allowed).
But one more side of the peanut-free school....if it came to that, for me, I would want egg and milk banned as well. I would because those foods can also kill my children(known anaphylaxis). If our school had a peanut ban before I moved here, I'd be asking for egg and milk as well, if they can ban one food, then they need to ban everything that can pose a danger. Then my friends daughter is anaphylaxic to wheat, so she of course would need a ban......and that brings me back to my point of *where do yo draw the line*???
As it stands, my son sits at his peanut-free table, when the school serves egg sandwiches, I make his table egg-free too.....when his brother and sister get there, those same tables will need to keep them safe as well.
sorry I have to run and get my kids, thanks for letting me ask these types of questions, I really don't mean anything by it...I just think outside the box, so-to-say! Thanks [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)

Posted on: Mon, 02/05/2007 - 6:38am
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Such a thoughtful discussion, but had to go POOF
[This message has been edited by NicoleinNH (edited June 10, 2007).]
[This message has been edited by NicoleinNH (edited June 10, 2007).]

Posted on: Mon, 02/05/2007 - 6:48am
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Quote:Originally posted by chanda4:
[b]auntAmanda...
sorry for all my typ-o's when you quoted me, LOL!!! But no, my sons room is NOT nut free. The teacher can ask parents to please consider Jake when they bring treats, btu if a parent wanted to bring in peanut butter cookies, the teacher could NOT turn them away. They will NOT ban a food. [/b]
Both my boys' schools ban [i]home-made[/i] goods. :GRINGRINGRIN:
I mean, who is so full of themselves they think other people are waiting to gobble up what they cook [i]in their kitchens, with their grubby paws.[/i] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/eek.gif[/img]

Posted on: Mon, 02/05/2007 - 6:49am
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Several of you have posted about peanut bans, but none of you have directly answered the question Chandra and I have asked: would you support a milk ban if a parent in your school had an anaphylactic child and asked for it?
As I said in another thread, my son's last reaction was from being hit in the mouth with a piece of pizza at lunch, so this is not a frivolous question.

Posted on: Mon, 02/05/2007 - 6:53am
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I did answer that in another thread. I'll go find it.

Posted on: Mon, 02/05/2007 - 6:53am
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Y
[This message has been edited by NicoleinNH (edited June 10, 2007).]
[This message has been edited by NicoleinNH (edited June 10, 2007).]

Posted on: Mon, 02/05/2007 - 6:56am
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+++
[This message has been edited by NicoleinNH (edited June 10, 2007).]
[This message has been edited by NicoleinNH (edited June 10, 2007).]

Posted on: Mon, 02/05/2007 - 6:58am
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This is from another thread..
Chanda,
I get what you are saying and asking. I think there is a "tipping" point to any allergen in the public. I think peanuts have hit or are hitting that tipping point. Hitting it by the growing number of children in danger and severity of reaction. Take that and the fact that peanuts are not a staple in our diet and it makes sense to ban them for safety reasons. It will probably help more people than the number of people who will feel put out by it.
For milk, wheat and eggs...I think they are too much of a staple in our diet, combined with the fact that the reaction is *typically* less life threatening than a reaction to peanuts makes a ban unlikely.
But again...I really see where you are coming from and my pov is that I have a 3 year old...I need to protect him...his school needs to protect him....when/if he goes to public I can easily see how that protection would not NEED to include a ban. A can see policies, nut free table - wipe down, hand washing...all that could probably work very well and could possibly work for the other allergens.

Posted on: Mon, 02/05/2007 - 6:58am
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I need to clarify, my son Carson has had pizza with cheese scraped off, yes I would consider his allergy minor. His little sister whoever has had a swollen mouth, lips, neck and hives across face and neck from just infant formula running down her face...so I deff am more worried about the milk allergy with her(Savannah). Thus if it continues this high(which I know it might not, but it MIGHT) I will need precautions at school as well.
Jake's egg allergy has caused his throat to squeeze as well, so we do worry when the school serves egg breakfast sandwiches for lunch....his table becomes egg-free as well.
I need to read up now, just wanted to offer that info.
------------------
Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)

Posted on: Mon, 02/05/2007 - 7:01am
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Quote:Originally posted by NicoleinNH:
[b] Actually, I did answer it, and yes, I would support it, if it was necessary. Chanda has posted here that she used to (or still does) feed her milk allergic child pizza with the cheese scraped off, so I do not think a milk ban would be an absolute necessity for her son. As I don't believe an egg ban is necessary for my DD, since her older brother eats Eggo waffles in the same room as her and they contain egg. I wouldn't ask the school to do what we (her family) is not doing.
If the school decided it was necessary for a child I would be supportive.
Nicole
[/b]
But would you, in the back of your mind think: "I'll bet they scrape the cheese off her kids pizza. I'll bet their child is not [i]that allergic[/i]. Maybe they are just trying to one up peanut allergies."
Would you want [i]proof[/i]? Or would you just take them at their word?
Come to think of it, there have been here people who post their children's peanut allergies "aren't severe".

Posted on: Mon, 02/05/2007 - 7:03am
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+++
[This message has been edited by NicoleinNH (edited June 10, 2007).]
[This message has been edited by NicoleinNH (edited June 10, 2007).]

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