Mysterious Symptoms

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DD has very sensitive skin, so it is not uncommon for her to have a little spot of irritation here or there if she scratches herself or even rubs something against her skin. This can be very frustrating/nerve wracking in light of the peanut allergy we discovered in May. Tonight, while I was at class, she went out to eat with my husband and in-laws. They went to a restaurant we've been to several times, she had food she's had before, etc. We eat out at least once a week, we would absolutely stop if we felt it was no longer safe, and we only go to restaurants in our comfort zone. (There's not always much to do in our part of Ohio, but eating out is like a sport here so we have lots of choices.) Anyway. . .

The family got home from dinner with no problem, DH gave DD a bath and put her to bed. I got home about 7:45 and five minutes later she began screaming alarmingly from her crib. When I got her up she was clearly uncomfortable, was squirming around like she was in pain, and was pulling at her pajamas like she was itchy. She did not vomit but said her tummy hurt. She had rapidly spreading hives with her first peanut reaction, and her skin didn't look anything like that tonight, it was just a little flushed, but in some wierd places, like her elbows.

When I couldn't calm her down I took her into the kitchen where the light is better and stripped her down to her diaper. We had the epi pen ready to go, but her symptoms didn't seem totally consistent with a reaction. She was clearly not having trouble breathing and I felt a strong pulse. I called the emergency # for our allergist and was connected with her. She said it didn't sound like a certain allergic reaction, but to go ahead and give Benadryl and take DD to the urgent care down the street from us. I would have given the epi if she had started vomitting, been scratching at/in her mouth, or had any sign of respiratory trouble.

We did give Benadryl and head to the urgent care. She had one or two(small) clearly defined hives near one eyebrow, and one (aldo small) over her lip. She stopped complaining about her stomach after about 20 minutes from when she initially woke up, and did not seem at all distressed at any point.

The verdict from the doctor at urgent care was that she might have some kind of virus and the few hives might be the result of that. She said heat (bath and warm pajamas under blankets) might have drawn the hives out. The doctor checked her and couldn't see any sign of swelling/hives in her mouth or throat. If DD does have a virus, she said we might see hives for the next couple of days, and could continue to use Benadryl if DD is itchy. The doctor did not think it was an allergic reaction.

If I can fall asleep tonight I will get up around the time the Benadryl is supposed to wear off and check on DD.

We have only been dealing with this for about nine months. This is the first thing even remotely resembaling a reaction we've had. Once in a while she gets a random spot or two, which we'll keep an eye on, but nothing has ever developed. Any advice on dealing with "mystery" hives? My stomach drops and my heart races anytime I think she might be starting a reaction. She is too young to be scared, but PA terrifies me. How do you all handle the ups/downs, and scares? It feels like such a roller coaster.

------------------ Mom to Harper 11/17/04 PA

On Feb 13, 2007

Nothing worse than mystery hives! From what I understand (and I'm not a medical expert), it could be a virus or it could be an allergic reaction (the fact her tummy felt better soon after the benedryl makes me wonder).

Have you thought about keeping a food diary? That can help give you a bit more feeling of "control" over things and you might see some patterns. It seems like each person experiences this allergy a little bit differently, so it will take a while to learn your daughters pattern. When that happens, the roller coaster won't be quite so scary.

Take care and hope this helps!

On Feb 13, 2007

Were they new PJs by chance? Companies have started putting this flame retardant stuff in pajamas. It makes me itch to high heaven, I have to wash my new pajamas 4-5 times before they're wearable [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img]

Even if she's worn them one or two times before, if she was sweating or still wet from her bath, it might cause that chemical to leach out from the fabric...

just a thought.

On Feb 16, 2007

[quote]Originally posted by kelseyjane: [B] (There's not always much to do in our part of Ohio, but eating out is like a sport here so we have lots of choices.) [Quote}

LOL- We're in Ohio too [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

I have a mystery hive child myself. Wish I could offer some advice but all I can really say is Thank Goodness for Benadryl! It can be extremely scary and stressful trying to figure out what's going on at first. Sounds like you handled it well. Hope she is feeling better now [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

------------------ 10 yo dd- PA,TNA, tests pos to soy, CATS, many environmentals, Asthmatic 5 yo dd- NKA, avoiding nuts 3 yo dd- outgrown milk/soy, avoiding nuts

[This message has been edited by krc (edited February 16, 2007).]

On Feb 16, 2007

A few more random hives plus some "loose" movements leads me to believe that the virus theory was probably correct after all.

DD is doing find now. Thanks for your suggestions. I have thought about doing a food diary, if we start having multiple situations where we don't know what is going on, I probably will. Hope that doesn't happen.

I appreciate the input, esp the point about Pjs being new. The ones DD was wearing were hand me downs and she's worn them for months; no new soap or anything either. But I appreciate the input. It would be something to think of if it happened again.

I really do appreciate the support of this group. I don't post often, but the reading helps me.

------------------ Mom to Harper 11/17/04 PA

On Feb 19, 2007

Of course, diarrhea can also be caused by an allergic reaction to food, so that makes it hard to know for sure, too.

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