My son may have outgrown his PA!!!

Posted on: Tue, 05/21/2002 - 12:22pm
Suz-a-loo's picture
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pMy son's allergist just called with his RAST results. He thinks that he may no longer have the allergy or may be slightly allergic. I was so excited to hear this considering his skin test about a year ago showed that he was highly allergic. However, I am confused because there were two different types of blood tests run for his PA. One test showed a Class 1 and the other (which the doctor says is the more sensitive of the two tests) showed a Class 0 which he says means negative. He said the Class 1 could mean negative or a slight allergy. He warned us to continue keeping him away from peanuts and carry the epipen at all times just in case. He said that we could retest my son in a year again and see if both tests come out Class 0. Has anyone ever heard of two different types of blood tests? The first test said:/p
pPeanuts - RAST - 85% REFbr /
Peanut Class - 1 Class/p
pand the second test said:/p
pPeanuts Conc. 0.35 KU/Lbr /
Peanut Conc. Class - 0 Class/p
pDoes anyone know what this means? The doctor wasn't very helpful in explaining this to me./p

Posted on: Tue, 05/21/2002 - 1:02pm
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Those are almost identical to my son's last CAP RAST results for peanuts. One scale is the conventional and the other is the modified. My son's conventional score was <0.35 (Class 0) and his modified was 70 (class 1/0 equivocal). From what I understand the conventional scale cannot measure below 0.35 so it is possible they still have antibodies even when they score 0 on that scale. On the modified scale, they can not measure below 60.
Hope that helps a little. I hope your son has outgrown his allergy. How old is he?
Our son's last 3 CAP RAST have shown decreasing scores. He is almost 3 years old, but we plan to wait until he is 4 before we think about challenges etc. (assuming the scores stay low)
San

Posted on: Tue, 05/21/2002 - 1:12pm
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Thanks for your reply San. My son is 4 1/2 years old and was first diagnosed when he was 1 year old. This is all so confusing to me. Do you know why there are two different types of tests and what the difference is? My son also has eczema which has been out of control the past few months. I understand this is all connected. His report said that the conventional test is done on children who are less than 18 years old with atopic dermatitis. What is it about that particular test and the connection to my son's eczema that makes this test different? Is it more accurate than the other one or vice versa? This is all so confusing.

Posted on: Tue, 05/21/2002 - 1:14pm
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Joined: 05/11/2002 - 09:00

Congratulations. I love hearing about children who outgrow their allergies because it means that it may not be the life sentence for my little girl either. Keep us posted.

Posted on: Tue, 05/21/2002 - 2:12pm
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[This message has been edited by Suz-a-loo (edited May 22, 2002).]

Posted on: Tue, 05/21/2002 - 11:56pm
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Congratulations Suz-a-loo and San103! I hope they both continue with low scores and have indeed otgrown PA.
Did you practice strict avoidance (preparing foods from scratch etc..) ?

Posted on: Wed, 05/22/2002 - 5:59am
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Thanks for the congrats. I wouldn't say that we were so strict that everything was made from scratch. However, we were very careful about reading labels and staying away from food that, although not labeled, may be cross-contaminated.

Posted on: Wed, 05/22/2002 - 6:47am
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Thanks Suz-a-loo. I am so happy for you. I hope we will have more and more of such cases.

Posted on: Wed, 05/22/2002 - 7:20am
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Joined: 11/14/2001 - 09:00

I have to add my Good Luck wishes too!
I'm glad your allergist is waiting another year to make sure and see if the tests are negative. Sounds like everyone here that gave me that advice know what their talking about.
Good Luck Suz-a-loo keep in touch!

Posted on: Wed, 05/22/2002 - 11:36am
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Joined: 05/17/2002 - 09:00

That is great news about your son! I was told from our nurse, "There is no guarantee that he will grow out of it, there is no magic medicine." I am just hoping that he will some day. I have never heard about any kid growing out of it, until now of course! That is great! I now have hope that maybe someday I can join you in your excitement!!

Posted on: Wed, 05/22/2002 - 9:14pm
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Yeah, Suz-a-loo!
One question: How early and how much was your child sensitized before his reactions and diagnosis? (ie. Did you eat peanut butter A LOT while pregnant or nursing, etc...)

Posted on: Thu, 05/23/2002 - 3:06am
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Thanks everyone for your congrats! We are cautiously excited about this. I am praying that in a year the tests will be completely negative.
Lam: I ate tons of peanuts when I was pregnant with my son because 1) I like peanuts and 2) I thought it was an excellent source of protein. I have no idea whether or not this caused my son to have this allergy. I didn't start feeding him any peanut products until almost 1 year of age. He started eating crackers with a little peanut butter on them. After a few months (I think that's how long it was), he started having reactions. Although we had never had a RAST test done on him before this time, his skin tests showed that he was severely allergic (the wheals (sp?) were very large). He has been both touch and airborne sensitive. So, I guess there is hope even for those children who are severely allergic. I will keep all of you in my prayers in hopes that all of your children will someday be PA free.
[This message has been edited by Suz-a-loo (edited May 23, 2002).]

Posted on: Thu, 05/23/2002 - 3:49am
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Suz-a-loo,
Thank you so much!!! Your answers have given me hope for our son. I ate PB everyday - doctor's orders (arrgh!) - while pregnant.
Is your family allergy prone? I have a couple medicine allergies, and my husband has some environmental allergies. I think there is one case of asthma in our family - our son's great-grandmother. Our son does not have asthma at present, and his eczema is almost a memory. He was dx at 18 mos. and is now 5 1/2.
I think it was the article by Jane Brody in the NY Times that quotes Dr. Sampson as saying something about those children who are highly sensitized at a very early age are most likely NOT to outgrow the allergy. My son fits that bill, but it sounds like yours does, too!
I'm so excited for your family, and hopeful for ours.
Take care,
Tammy

Posted on: Thu, 05/23/2002 - 2:21pm
Suz-a-loo's picture
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Hi Tammy! I will definitely keep your family in my prayers. Although we are not 100% certain that his allergy is gone, the doctor seems to think that if he is still allergic, he is at least on his way to outgrowing it. My side of the family is definitely prone to allergies. I don't know of any food allergies in the family other than my son. However, there is eczema and hay fever type allergies. So, even though my son was exposed to peanuts very early on, I think that our family history made him more prone to getting the allergy than the exposure. That's my theory anyways. I wish your family the best of luck in conquering this terrible allergy.

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