My daughter has a peanut allergy.

Posted on: Mon, 12/31/2001 - 2:30am
Wolfmeis's picture
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Joined: 12/31/2001 - 09:00

She was dx with it six months ago after a reaction to her first peanutbutter sandwich. She was a year and six days old then, and it seems like a decade has passed since then. A RAST test showed that she is also sensitive to pecans, egg whites, and corn. She develops eczema and diaper rash to the other things, but the peanut she had that day caused severe swelling, redness and hives. She also has reacted similarly to walnuts.

The dr did not prescribe epi pens and think her allergy is mild enough that she may outgrow it. Personally I think this is probably a load of hooey but I would LOVE to think it so.

I am having problems with my family (her grandparents) thinking that we are overreacting in trying to shield her from peanuts and peanut products. My family keeps giving us nuts because "you can eat them even if she can't" when they know my husband and I don't keep nuts in the house. No one else in my family has food allergies so they really don't know / believe that my daughter could die from one. I am scared, for her, of them.

I just found this message board and hope to gain some support and knowledge here.

------------------
Lory
Graham Rose 6-6-2000

Posted on: Mon, 12/31/2001 - 10:48am
PattyR's picture
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Joined: 04/12/2002 - 09:00

Hi Lory and welcome to the boards. I will be the first but certainly not the last to tell you that you do need an epipen. Make an appt. with a good allergist and don't leave the office without one. Better yet, call you pediatrician and ask for one over the phone. Don't take no for an answer. Not to be an alarmist but you never know how a reaction is going to go and an epipen is what makes the difference.

Posted on: Mon, 12/31/2001 - 1:20pm
Carefulmom's picture
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Joined: 01/03/2002 - 09:00

Count me as number two who says you need a new doctor. The first time my daughter had egg at age two and a half, she had hives, wheezing, and swelling around her eyes. I used the Epipen and saved her life. When her doctor first prescribed it, I never thought I would be using it. You never know. Besides if your child`s allergies are potentially life threatening, what are you supposed to do if she has a reaction? Anyone who has had hives and swelling needs an Epipen.

Posted on: Mon, 12/31/2001 - 7:35pm
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Hi Lori,
I am with the others. Find an allergist who is willing to listen to you. And definitely get the epipen.If you never have to use it thats great but what if your daughter has a serious reaction and you haven't got one??
Regarding family not taking you seriously Don't be nice about it to them. If they say you can eat peanuts and the like: tell them sternly you don't want to jeopardise your daugheters health and therefore you choose not to eat peanuts and to have a peanut free home and that as you are her parent you would appreciate them taking this as seriously as you are. I am still convincing my family and my friends but I do know if you are not firm with your directions you will have a harder job of being taken seriously. I have only just started being forceful and after requesting guests not bring peanuts to our home on new years eve and finding a chocolate slice ladden with nuts I told the guest I appreciated the effort they had gone to making the dessert but that I would not be serving it inside due to my daughter not being able to eat it. I told tehm they were free to eat it outside (where there was noone else) or I would leave it sealed on top of the fridge until they went home. They were probably shocked but what could they say I was enforcing a rule in my home to protect my child.
I hope you learn as much from the boards as I have over the last month.welcom and happy reading.

Posted on: Tue, 01/01/2002 - 1:16am
pamom's picture
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Joined: 02/20/2001 - 09:00

Hi and welcome!!
This website will become your savior in the upcoming years. I have turned to it so often when dealing with peanut allergy problems, whether it is with family or schools.
I agree you HAVE to get an allergist right away. Get one that deals with peanut and food allergies a lot. You will have to get an epipen. My 8 year old had her first reaction at 2 with just hives and swollen eyes and runny nose. She had a reaction when she was five that would have killed her if I would not have used my epi at home. The doctors say she never would have survived the trip to the hospital. So get one and practice using it. Don't wait until it is too late, you will not want to read the directions while your child is turning blue.
As far as your family goes, print some articles about peanut allergy. Find scary ones, sometimes the one way to evoke a response is fear. You have got to get your point across and the only way my relatives woke up was from media exposure. Reading from a newspaper or hearing about a child on the news made them realize this is real, not something in neurotic mom's head or a doctor.
Good luck and use this web site, it is a saver!!

Posted on: Wed, 01/02/2002 - 1:12am
Carefulmom's picture
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Joined: 01/03/2002 - 09:00

As far as learning to use an Epipen, there is an Epipen trainer you can get from Dey pharmaceuticals (a fake one) to practice with. Also FAAN has a great video (800)929-4040 called "It Only Takes One Bite" to watch and to show to anyone who doesnst think this is serious. Also, when my Epipens expire, I practice injecting the real one into an orange or I let the teachers do it. The other mom is right; you can`t be reading the instructions for the first time while your child is gasping for air. I practice once every six months.

Posted on: Mon, 12/31/2001 - 10:48am
PattyR's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/12/2002 - 09:00

Hi Lory and welcome to the boards. I will be the first but certainly not the last to tell you that you do need an epipen. Make an appt. with a good allergist and don't leave the office without one. Better yet, call you pediatrician and ask for one over the phone. Don't take no for an answer. Not to be an alarmist but you never know how a reaction is going to go and an epipen is what makes the difference.

Posted on: Mon, 12/31/2001 - 1:20pm
Carefulmom's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/03/2002 - 09:00

Count me as number two who says you need a new doctor. The first time my daughter had egg at age two and a half, she had hives, wheezing, and swelling around her eyes. I used the Epipen and saved her life. When her doctor first prescribed it, I never thought I would be using it. You never know. Besides if your child`s allergies are potentially life threatening, what are you supposed to do if she has a reaction? Anyone who has had hives and swelling needs an Epipen.

Posted on: Mon, 12/31/2001 - 7:35pm
anonymous's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Hi Lori,
I am with the others. Find an allergist who is willing to listen to you. And definitely get the epipen.If you never have to use it thats great but what if your daughter has a serious reaction and you haven't got one??
Regarding family not taking you seriously Don't be nice about it to them. If they say you can eat peanuts and the like: tell them sternly you don't want to jeopardise your daugheters health and therefore you choose not to eat peanuts and to have a peanut free home and that as you are her parent you would appreciate them taking this as seriously as you are. I am still convincing my family and my friends but I do know if you are not firm with your directions you will have a harder job of being taken seriously. I have only just started being forceful and after requesting guests not bring peanuts to our home on new years eve and finding a chocolate slice ladden with nuts I told the guest I appreciated the effort they had gone to making the dessert but that I would not be serving it inside due to my daughter not being able to eat it. I told tehm they were free to eat it outside (where there was noone else) or I would leave it sealed on top of the fridge until they went home. They were probably shocked but what could they say I was enforcing a rule in my home to protect my child.
I hope you learn as much from the boards as I have over the last month.welcom and happy reading.

Posted on: Tue, 01/01/2002 - 1:16am
pamom's picture
Offline
Joined: 02/20/2001 - 09:00

Hi and welcome!!
This website will become your savior in the upcoming years. I have turned to it so often when dealing with peanut allergy problems, whether it is with family or schools.
I agree you HAVE to get an allergist right away. Get one that deals with peanut and food allergies a lot. You will have to get an epipen. My 8 year old had her first reaction at 2 with just hives and swollen eyes and runny nose. She had a reaction when she was five that would have killed her if I would not have used my epi at home. The doctors say she never would have survived the trip to the hospital. So get one and practice using it. Don't wait until it is too late, you will not want to read the directions while your child is turning blue.
As far as your family goes, print some articles about peanut allergy. Find scary ones, sometimes the one way to evoke a response is fear. You have got to get your point across and the only way my relatives woke up was from media exposure. Reading from a newspaper or hearing about a child on the news made them realize this is real, not something in neurotic mom's head or a doctor.
Good luck and use this web site, it is a saver!!

Posted on: Wed, 01/02/2002 - 1:12am
Carefulmom's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/03/2002 - 09:00

As far as learning to use an Epipen, there is an Epipen trainer you can get from Dey pharmaceuticals (a fake one) to practice with. Also FAAN has a great video (800)929-4040 called "It Only Takes One Bite" to watch and to show to anyone who doesnst think this is serious. Also, when my Epipens expire, I practice injecting the real one into an orange or I let the teachers do it. The other mom is right; you can`t be reading the instructions for the first time while your child is gasping for air. I practice once every six months.

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