milk allergies(Kayley\'s story makes me scared)

Posted on: Sun, 01/21/2007 - 11:30am
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I have 2 little ones with milk allergies. My 3 1/2yr old broke out in hives at birth and after a few weeks we figured it out. And my almost 1yr old, same thing(figured it out quicker since we'd been through it before). But, like Kailey(sorry I miss-spelled her name in the subject line, I tried to correct it), they haven't had any serious reactions, maybe some hives, severe stomach pain, diarrhea and my youngest did get some lip/mouth swelling once. How do you know if it's going to be life threatening??? For the last 3 1/2 yrs when we order pizza I just scrap all the cheese off C's piece and he eats it....but after hearing stories like Kailey or even Sabrina....how do you know when it's life threatening?? I suppose I should stop just peeling cheese off his food, because I never know. But then people look at me like "well, you've been doing it all along and nothing has happened"...I'm torn and don't know what to do. They're CAP RAST has been a little on the low side (3 1/2yr old is 1.65(level 2) and my 1yr old is 2.20(level 2). Would you suggest I get a little more serious, my other 2 kids drink milk, while the younger ones drink rice milk...so it's in the house and they are around it. I am just scared I'm not doing enough and one of these days I will be in trouble. I suppose I need to ask the allergist, but they kind of give you a run around....I'll call tomorrow. I wish food allergies were black and white, there are too many gray areas inmy opinion. Thanks for letting me ramble. Chanda

[This message has been edited by chanda4 (edited January 21, 2007).]

Posted on: Sun, 01/21/2007 - 12:05pm
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My daughter has milk, egg, rice, and peanut allergies. I would never give her pizza with the cheese pealed off, but you have your comfort zone and you have a right to it. My allergist's advise gave me a very narrow comfort zone even though her milk RAST score is rather low. I have the comfort zone I have mostly because I believe what my allergist says. I have to admit I am influence a bit by what I read here - especially in regards to manufacturers pratices. What does your allergist say? Mine says that although my dd reactions to milk have never gone beyond hives that you cannot tell how sever the next reaction will be by what the previous ones have been. I maybe an extremist in how I react to her allergies. We don't take her out to eat. I would never let her eat anything from a bakery or deli. Keep reading what you see here and you will find people with varing comfort zones and everyone is doing what they truely believe is in the absolute best interest of their child. I think I also act on the fear that if I don't have a tight comfort zone something will happen and I will spend the rest of my days regreting it. I don't know if that is the right way to live, but it is the best I can do. I don't know if that helps you but it is meant too.
Cindy

Posted on: Sun, 01/21/2007 - 12:07pm
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I know, that sounds unheard of...but we've been doing it for a couple years....so I don't know how serious this is, if it's just a minor allergy or if it's going to turn serious in 9 years(like Kailey's). He's eaten baked foods with milk in it too....I've really tried to get serious about this in the last couple of months even, but then family gives me a hard time because we've had no problems before, so why change(is their question).....but I totally understand your comment, I would NEVER scrape peanut butter off my PA child's sandwich....because he WOULD have a reaction...but with the milk, most likely he wouldn't(it's not black and white)...
I needed to EDIT....when we found out he was positive to milk, his allergist never said he could die, just keep it out of his diet as best we could...I did think peeling the cheese off the pizza was okay, never had I heard of cross contamination until recently(and yes I am learning SO much from this site, thank you!!!) since he wasn't actually eating the cheese, and not having a reaction, I thought it worked.....but I know, I am learning, I need to be WAAAAY mroe careful and I am trying to do so, I am. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
[This message has been edited by chanda4 (edited January 21, 2007).]

Posted on: Sun, 01/21/2007 - 12:22pm
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I c
[This message has been edited by onedayatatime (edited September 11, 2007).]

Posted on: Sun, 01/21/2007 - 12:27pm
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I would say that you definitely need to talk to your allergist. From what I know about milk allergies, they can range in severity moreso than peanut allergies.
We don't let my ds eat anything with any traces of milk because him symptoms are anaphylactic, so no point in going in that direction.
I think if you asked a bunch of people in a room with milk allergic children, they could all potentially have different experiences. For example, I have a friend who gives her dd the pizza crust, and she doesn't react to it. I have another friend who's ds went into anaphylaxis from his brother eating cheese popcorn and lifting up his shirt to change it and the residue got in the air. We are somewhere in the middle of those two examples.
There is also the whole theory that strict avoidance will help with outgrowing the allergy to consider.
Most importantly, as far as symptoms go -- if two body systems are involved in one reaction, then it is defined as anaphylaxis. I'm not sure from your description if one symptom or more than one were present. Lip swelling, I was told by my allergist FWIW, is to be treated very seriously.
If you're feeling uncomfortable with how you're doing things, I don't see any reason why you couldn't try changing them. Family members...well...they'll always have opinions right? But they're not the parents here.
Has your allergist given you an emergency action plan? If not, I'd ask for one. It should detail treatment needed for symptoms of reactions, and perhaps that will help you. Meg

Posted on: Sun, 01/21/2007 - 12:47pm
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Anna....(hey thanks to all of you for your opinions, I really do appreciate it) but you had brought up the point, do you eliminate ALL the allergy foods from your house??? At what point is it enough, or do you need to do more??? I have those same questions. I know it would be BESt if I did keep all our allergy foods out of the house, but that the same time, it would be impossible.....between all 4 of my kids they are allergic to peanuts/all tree nuts, milk, eggs, soy, chocolate, beef and pork(and possibly turkey).....that would be impossible! Often at dinner I use turkey meat for some, and hamburger for the others, or cows milk for some and rice milk for the others....I try to make meals safe for everyone, but I usually cook a version for this child and another for the other....if that makes sense.....I should eliminate ALL the allergen foods, but then what would we eat...it's hard

Posted on: Sun, 01/21/2007 - 12:53pm
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Trust your instincts. If you feel like you need to tighten your comfort zone - do it, and don't worry about what others think. Just tell them you are following the doctor's orders. Whoever brought up the fact that limiting exposures can help your child to outgrow, that is an excellent point and a great reason to point out to anyone who questions you.
Before I understood about label reading and x contamination, my PA son had his share of may contains. But I don't look back on it and think those things we ever ok for him - I think we were incredibly lucky, and had God watching over him.

Posted on: Sun, 01/21/2007 - 1:09pm
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I would have used the epi for lip swelling. The reason is that if there is lip swelling, there could be swelling of the airway or throat that you can`t see. In fact, my dd was prescribed an epi because she got a few hives after drinking milk. We do strict avoidance, and in fact, she has had a reaction from an item where a knife had been used for something with milk, rinsed, and dried (we were told it had been washed, but that turned out not to be true, it was only rinsed), then used to prepare something for dd. Just to give you a frame of reference her cap rast to milk was 1.22 when she had the reaction due to the shared knife. I believe in strict avoidance, read all ingredients and don`t give her any items with milk, casein, whey, etc. As far as the relatives, if I did what my relatives said, dd would not be alive. When it goes against my child`s safety, I totally ignore what they say. It isn`t their child.
[This message has been edited by Carefulmom (edited January 21, 2007).]

Posted on: Sun, 01/21/2007 - 1:18pm
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Chanda,
Your child is experiencing symptoms that may be more serious that you realize. I have gastrointestinal anaphylaxis with shellfish. Another adult member of the board here has it with peanut. Maybe she'll jump in.
I had an ana reaction to cross contamination that caused GI anaphylaxis. Tongs that had touched shrimp were used to turn my steak. Two hours later I was dealing with diarrhea and horrible stomach cramps. I took lots of benadryl and eventually had to use an Epi (finally developed chest pains). That reaction became a protracted reaction--lasted four days, and I develped uterine contractions as another symptom (this is after the epi). GI reactions are more likely to result in protracted reactions, BTW.
At this point, all of my shellfish reactions have been GI (with the exception of my first symptom--spaciness, a headache, and the others I described). No hives. No swollen throat. Nothing else, yet. But I must stay away from the stuff, or I could die.
I will raise a GI reaction thread in the adult forum.
It [b]is serious. [/b]
To answer one of your questions about your house, I do know there is a post here that details what a few members do to keep dairy from their dairy allergic kids--even if they have it in their homes. It involves really segregating the fridge, dedicated pans, and I think even dedicated flatware or plates for someone.
You may want to look at that thread to get some ideas
Good luck with this.

Posted on: Sun, 01/21/2007 - 1:21pm
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Edit for the purpose of lurkers
[This message has been edited by NicoleinNH (edited June 10, 2007).]

Posted on: Sun, 01/21/2007 - 1:24pm
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Carefulmom...the lip swelling happend on my then 5 week old after holding a bottle of formula at her mouth(the formula dripped down her chin). I did give bendryl right away, but wasn't prepared(or educate) to do the epipen yet(this was her first reaction). I do have an epipen handy now, and with her(her level was 2.20) I am more careful(I am still breastfeeding her, so I have to pretend *I* am milk allergic as well). But all laong her 3 yr old brother(his level was 1.65), also milk allergic had been eating pizza with the cheese peeled off, no reactions(but positive testing)....so these are 2 very extreme reactions, thus the confusion(for me) as to what exactly do I need to do here....do I continue the way things are or do I buckle my butt down and be VERY careful, no exceptions??
edit, I know I can't say my 3yr old is reaction free, the hives and stomach pain/diarrhea was when he was younger, nothing in the last say 2yrs....
and for my youger one, she has had the hives, swollen lips ans also stomach pain(which has stopped since I cut ALL milk products out of my diet, in the last 11mths(since nursing)....I hope that is not confusing.
[This message has been edited by chanda4 (edited January 21, 2007).]

Posted on: Sun, 01/21/2007 - 1:31pm
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[(
[This message has been edited by onedayatatime (edited September 11, 2007).]

Posted on: Sun, 01/21/2007 - 1:38pm
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Greetings Earthling! It's raised. FYI--I started a thread somewhere--I think in Main--about protracted anaphylaxis if you ever need it.

Posted on: Sun, 01/21/2007 - 1:40pm
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Here's a link to the GI reactions thread for posterity:
[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum24/HTML/000176.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum24/HTML/000176.html[/url]

Posted on: Sun, 01/21/2007 - 3:03pm
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Please do not just scrape the cheese off. That is very dangerous. You can order the pizza without cheese. Thats what I would do for Kailey. You do never know when this could be life threatening so please for your children do not take the chance. If you would talk to Kaileys allergiest he would not give you the run around. He would tell you like he told me DO NOT HAVE IT IN THE HOUSE OR ANYWHERE NEAR YOUR CHILD.
Kailey would always drink soy milk. When I had my two boys I put them on soy milk. They did not and do not have allergies like their sister but I did not want milk to be anywhere around her. I could not take the chance of maybe some milk dripping out of a bottle and Kailey some how come across it. Or her kiss her brothers and she be gone. I just fed my children only what Kailey could have. Just so she would be safe and not singled out.
PLease learn from KAileys story. This is very serious. It is Nothing to be taken lightly.

Posted on: Sun, 01/21/2007 - 4:25pm
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My dd Allison has a mild milk allergy. When we go out for pizza, we order a personal sized one for her with no cheese, and we always double check to make sure there is no milk in the crust.
My MIL is one of those sorts that think you can just peel the cheese off, or just pick the sesame off of a hamburger bun, or stuff like that. It drives me insane.
We've never been able to go completely milk free in our house, because until fairly recently my oldest was allergic to soy, and neither of the older boys would touch the only other milk subs we had left (rice milk or dari-free). We have a system of keeping things separate that works pretty well for us, so we've only had a handful of "oopsies" over the past 4 years.
------------------
Cheryl, mom to Jason (9 MFA including peanuts, tree nuts, shellfish and egg)
Joey (7 NKA)
Allison (4 milk allergic, suspect shellfish, avoiding PN/TN for now)
Ryan (1) nka *knock on wood*

Posted on: Sun, 01/21/2007 - 6:44pm
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The very first time I gave R (8) anything with dairy in it was when he was about 7 months old. I made him this baby pasta with baby pasta sauce that had a tiny bit of cheese in it.
Within seconds his lips swelled up to his nose, his eyes swelled closed. Frankly, I don't know how he isn't dead. I called the on-call dr. and he said to come down to the office and get an antihistamine even though he was a bit young for it. What he should have told me was CALL AN AMBULANCE (we had no epipen at that point in time and didn't know we needed one). He did say that if he had trouble breathing to call ambulance. So there I am driving like a lunatic to the doctor's office, praying my kid is still alive when I get back (his dad was with him). No mobile at the time. We were lucky, I got back with antihistamine and he was okay.
I would NEVER EVER EVER let him have even the slightest risk of exposure to anything with dairy. To be honest, the thought of scrapping cheese off a pizza just makes my blood run cold and my heart stop. Just because it is scrapped off doesn't mean it IS off. IYKWIM. The cheese is baked into the pizza - it is all over it whether you scrap the gooey bit off.
My DS is contact-sensitive. He will have a major reaction to just touching dairy.
And I hate to tell you this but each exposure to an allergen almost always makes the allergy worse. The the more traces and small amounts you are feeding your child the worse the allergy will become.
I would get a second opinion from another allergist.
Good luck.
Barb

Posted on: Mon, 01/22/2007 - 12:20am
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I thought I replied one last time before I went to bed last night, but I don't see it now.???
In recent months I have started ordering him(and I) our own pizza, usually pepperoni with no cheese, but now he is allergic to pork...so we haven't had pizza since. Most crusts still have milk in them anyways, so I looked further and found Domino's thin crust doesn't...for future reference.
If he were my 1st born child, I could have easily had *everyone* just drinking the rice milk(well, he started on soy milk but at age 2, after drinking/eating it for a year and being negative, he turned positive) so just he and his little sister are on rice milk. My older kids litterally make puking faces and noises when they smell the rice milk, so they are allowed to drink the cow's milk. I am careful, but not diligent....like I've explained, he's eaten plenty of pizza with the cheese peeled off and been fine(like for 3yrs). I know that Barb was really bothered that we did this, but my whole resoning behind my post is that we did and he's been fine........that I wish(and now I see a new post up top touching on this same topic) why can some kids eat tiny amounts of the food they are allergic to and some die.....I WISH this were cut and dry, black and white. I do, now, everything I can to avoid milk products for him and his sister because I don't want, down the road in 9 years for them to have a severe reaction and die, even after years of no reactions...but a positive test.
Thank you for your views and opinions on this, it helps, it really does.
psI do understand the whole *the more you're exposed* deal...his milk rast on 9/05 was 3.89 and 1/07 was 1.65 so it has come down, hopefully with me being more careful it will even further, now that I know I need to. (for refernce, his little sisters has gone up 8/06 she was .98 and 1/07 she is 2.20) Thank you!!!

Posted on: Mon, 01/22/2007 - 1:04am
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Cap rasts are very inaccurate unless done at one of two labs. Hugh Sampson did a study where they sent cap rasts on the same patient but under a different name to the same lab. The results varied widely. There were only two labs where the results were consistent within the same lab. So imagine having blood on your child sent to the same lab under three different names and you get three different results. Very inaccurate. Recently dd had blood sent for cap rast to two different labs (long story why, I need to start a thread on this when I have time) and the results were so different it was mind boggling.

Posted on: Mon, 01/22/2007 - 1:28am
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I think that milk allergy has a wide spectrum of severity. Our next-door neighbor boy is allergic to milk. He's had allergy testing and everything. But he just can't drink any milk and he can't eat much ice cream. But he eats cheese, and he eats things with milk as an ingredient. When I first found this out, I just couldn't understand it. But apparently his Dr. has okayed this since he doesn't react badly unless it's outright milk. It is a diagnosed allergy, not lactose intolerance or something. His uncle had the same allergy throughout his life, so his mom handles it the same way.
Now, I wonder if they didn't outgrow it because they kept eating the stuff. But they appear to somehow be able to eat limited quantities of milk without worsening their allergy. I've heard of another girl in our church who's the same way: no outright milk, but milk in things is fine. Her mother said it is an allergy, although I don't know them personally like my neighbors. So there must be a wide variety of experiences with milk allergy. How you sort it out, I don't know. Lip swelling sounds serious to me.

Posted on: Mon, 01/22/2007 - 1:33am
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To spin off of carefulmom's last post, you also have the problem that for some reason, RAST testing on infants is more inaccurate than on an older child.
We held off testing Allison until she was 18 months old (we just worked under the assumption that she was milk allergic before that), and her initial RAST for milk was negative. Another RAST at 30 months came back positive. In that year between tests, we kept her off dairy, because IMO, a reaction trumps a test.
Skin prick tests aren't iron clad either. If you have active eczema at the time of testing, it can skew results. If you have extremely sensitive skin (a bare pin prick raises hives), that can skew results too.
My conclusions in regard to my kids allergies takes both their test results and history of reactions into account.
------------------
Cheryl, mom to Jason (9 MFA including peanuts, tree nuts, shellfish and egg)
Joey (7 NKA)
Allison (4 milk allergic, suspect shellfish, avoiding PN/TN for now)
Ryan (1) nka *knock on wood*

Posted on: Mon, 01/22/2007 - 3:27am
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Your issues sound very familiar. My son is now 11 (almost 12) and has a severe milk allergy. However, when he was young we were a lot more cavalier about things. While I wouldn't scrape the cheese off the pizza, I took a lot more risks with cross-contamination and not thoroughly checking ingredients.
As we learned more about reactions and understood the seriousness of them, my behaviors changed. The severity of his reactions seems to have to do with how much of an allergen he gets, how quickly we treat the reaction and what else is going on in his body at the time. That's why it's hard to know on any given day if your child is going to have trouble with the cheese you scrape off the pizza. Plus, many on this board do believe that total avoidance is the way to go if you want your child to outgrow the allergy. I will tell you that my son has had very serious reactions to what seems like very small amounts of milk to me.
We do not avoid milk totally in our house, as I have a second child without milk allergy. I don't believe it's healthy for her to do without milk. However, we do have rules about where she can have the milk (only at the table) and about teasing with food. Most of our family meals are milk-free, but there are times when Sabrina has a friend over and we make them a pizza. I think it's important to balance the needs of your children - otherwise, you end up with a child who resents all the sacrifices she had to make for her brother. That's not fair either.
We have a dishwasher with a high heat cycle to help ensure any protein on plates is degraded, and we do thorough rinse dishes with milk or peanut butter using different sponges.
Your child's reactions do sound more serious than you may think they are. I suggest you talk to your doctor and learn as much as you can so you can better assess the risk. "Milk allergy" can mean many different things and involve many different proteins, so it's best to get your information from an expert.

Posted on: Mon, 01/22/2007 - 3:37am
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hey BriandBrinasmom
thanks, your reply made alot of sense to me, and that is exactly what I am *trying* to do now....the past, I was wrong, so I am buckling down now. about the dishes too, I never thought it would cause problem, but all my kids have their own plates(and cups), each child has a color, so they only use their color when we eat anyways, I guess that helps us. But thanks again...I am making a call to the allergist right as we speak!

Posted on: Mon, 01/22/2007 - 4:33am
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i just wanted to put in my 2 cents about my sons dairy allergy.
we also just peel the cheese off the pizza and it dosnt bother him at all. however his dairy allergy is a pretty mild one and we have the freedom to do that.
erin

Posted on: Mon, 01/22/2007 - 8:51am
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This is so interesting to me, since every parent and every allergist have a different approach. My ds was diagnosed at 5 mos and he's now 3. Mild symptoms for the most part - hives with contact and runny nose/sneezing with ingestion, but very sensitive and reacts quickly. He's had some accidental exposures, one big one (3oz of drinkable yogurt) and his RAST has stayed the same, around 2.4 kU/L. We strictly avoid with him...no pizza deliveries. We do, however, have milk in our house and we use it occasionally in meals. Like burrito night, we use cheese chunks (not shredded - too messy) for the rest of the family and he just doesn't. I am alittle lax about "may contains" since this new law came out. If he had the items without incidence previously but now they slapped a warning on it, I still give it to him. But I am not this way for peanuts, nuts or eggs. I'm very strict about none of these in my house, even in prepackaged items that my dh eats at work.

Posted on: Mon, 01/22/2007 - 3:50pm
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My son's milk allergy has been dropping over the years. The highest was at the age of 2, he had a CAP RAST of 31. Last June at the age of 6, he a CAP RAST of 2. He's now at the stage where he can eat most things w/ milk in it, including small amounts of ice-cream and yogurt. But he can't drink milk or eat uncooked cheese. He's been eating like this for the last 2 years and my allergist has been fine w/ it.
When he was 3, I used to peel the cheese off the pizza. Now he can eat the pizza. Although I do notice that after eating pizza for 3 days in a row (He loves pizza), that he scratches his arms a little bit more.
By the way, he is anaphylactic to peanuts and nuts, and I would NEVER consider giving him anything w/ even a microscopic amount of peanut in it.

Posted on: Sat, 03/31/2007 - 3:20pm
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Reraising for Sheryl--just because there is some good info here, and people also ask some interesting questions.

Posted on: Sun, 04/01/2007 - 12:30am
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(quote edited out by office)
(name edited out by office)...you said this to me a couple months ago and it has stuck ever since. I said it to my hubby..."we might as well scrape the pb off Jake's sandwich"...he got it, that was a quick way of making it SINK IN. Thanks for saying what I wish someone would have said a long time ago....
we NO longer scrape any cheese off anything. He no longer gets snacks with a little milk in it(like rice crispie treats)....I have been very careful and plan on getting some answers as far as his level of contract, ingestion...all that before he enters preschool next fall. His levels are pretty low so maybe he is on his way to outgrowing it...I just want to be absolutly sure though, no more scraping!! Thanks [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
I've never given him milk, straight milk, yogurt, ice cream....I guess when it was *in* something it didn't seem as bad, maybe not as *pure*....but I blame that on eggs, because my egg allergic child's neck will squeeze from raw egg, but he can eat it, no reactions once it's baked in something...I guess I didn't understand the difference with the milk. I can admit it, I do some stupid things.
EDIT...just so I don't come across as a total idiot, we have also cut all egg out of any foods as well. Even though he never had any problems with it in baked goods, we have taken everything out(no foods with nuts, eggs or milk)....it was an adjustment, but I was just honest and told Jake "mommy wasn't being safe, it wasn't safe for him to eat cookies or cakes made with eggs"...he has been really good about it. I learn as I go, I'm only human.
------------------
Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig and EE)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)
[This message has been edited by chanda4 (edited April 01, 2007).]
[This message has been edited by chanda4 (edited April 01, 2007).]

Posted on: Sun, 04/01/2007 - 12:59am
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I would ask the allergist about it. I wouldn't take a chance because hives all over sounds serious and can get worse. There are things I was taking chances with too but then realized that maybe I was just lucky. People tell me all the time that me and DS have been eating it and has been fine. That doesn't mean anything.
My friend took chances with her PA child and they were fine for 5 years and he had 2 allergic reactions within one year after that. The last reaction his throat swelled. Milk allergies can be life threatening too.
The problem is that people that take chances are not always going to react unless the actual protien is in the food. We can't tell and that confuses people.
It makes me wonder about the kids who are allergic and are so quick to take a bite out a cookie that they are unsure of and have a fatal reaction, if they did not do it before and were lucky. Which is very scary.
We learn as we go. Good luck and be safe.
[This message has been edited by momll70 (edited April 01, 2007).]

Posted on: Sun, 04/01/2007 - 6:14am
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Hi Chandra,
We have milk allergy here and other allergies as well. I strongly urge you to take the milk allergy as seriously as you do peanut. A food allergy means it is potentially life-threatening. Past reactions do not tell us what future reactions will be like. They can give us only a general idea but people can go from previously having only very minor reactions to having a life-threatening reaction on the very next exposure and there is no way to tell to whom this will happen. We have to treat an allergy as potentially life-threatening as a result and to avoid exposure as totally as possible.
A lot RAST test does not mean a person won't have a reaction that is serious. My son's milk #s are about the same as yours and he is still allergic to milk. The fact that your son's #s are going down is a good sign but it doesn't guarantee a small reaction. There are people who test negative and yet have life-threatening reactions to foods.
As for serious reaction--what you described *is* serious. If my son ingested his allergens and had severe stomach pain, diarrhea and lip/mouth swelling I would give the epi and call 911 at once. Please see my other post here about GI reactions being more closely associated with fatal anaphylaxis than other types of reactions. Do you have an emergency plan from your allergist that tells you for which symptoms to give the epi?
I can't look back at the thread right now but I think you said that your allergist told you to try to avoid milk/dairy the best you can but not that it can be life-threatening. I might talk with another allergist. All food allergies can be life-threatening. That is what a food allergy means.
I can understand what you are saying about your family not wanting to change and not understanding why you are suddenly wanting to be more careful. Tell them that food allergies involve a long learning curve and now you know more and know that it isn't safe for your child to be exposed to *any* dairy, even a little bit because reactions can change from one exposure to the next and your child does have potentially life-threatening allergies to dairy. Also, your child has had serious reactions that should have received the epi according to *my* child's food allergy emergency plan.
Good luck!

Posted on: Sun, 04/01/2007 - 6:15am
lakeswimr's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by Carefulmom:
[b]Cap rasts are very inaccurate unless done at one of two labs. Hugh Sampson did a study where they sent cap rasts on the same patient but under a different name to the same lab. The results varied widely. There were only two labs where the results were consistent within the same lab. So imagine having blood on your child sent to the same lab under three different names and you get three different results. Very inaccurate. Recently dd had blood sent for cap rast to two different labs (long story why, I need to start a thread on this when I have time) and the results were so different it was mind boggling.[/b]
Do you know which two labs he recommends?

Posted on: Sun, 04/01/2007 - 7:49am
booandbrimom's picture
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I'm not sure Carefulmom is posting here anymore - she mentioned she was dropping out in another thread.
I can tell you where our pediatric allergist sends his tests though - Mayo Clinic.
Carefulmom and I had a whole exchange on this in another thread. I'll see if I can find and raise it for you.

Posted on: Sun, 04/01/2007 - 8:51am
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Thanks! I wonder if Quest is considered reliable. It is frustrating but not necessarily surprising to hear that RAST scores could vary greatly. I hope DS's are fairly accurate.

Posted on: Tue, 04/03/2007 - 4:13am
mistey's picture
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Is that REALLY true? I have never specifically ASKED my allergist which lab she sends for the RAST test, but I assumed that since she is a very well-respected doctor in a large children's hospital that she knows where to send them.
I would think that we would have differing numbers all over the place if different labs gave different results.

Posted on: Tue, 04/03/2007 - 4:41am
ambreitner's picture
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The allergist we see at the University of Michigan sends the blood to two different labs, one is in California and the other is at the Mayo Clinic. In our case he wanted to see a breakdown of specific proteins for milk and egg and each lab was able to do one but not both of these tests.
Ben is allergic to multiple foods, we do not have any nuts or nut products in our home but we do have other allergens. I do make all of his food seperate from the rest of the family and even though his allergy to milk is pretty low I would not give him anything that had been cooked with a dairy product.

Posted on: Tue, 04/03/2007 - 11:25am
lalow's picture
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i dont peel cheese off pizza but i dont worry about cross contamination to a great deal with my sons milk allergies. although i know he is still allergic (very positive skin test). he does not react to small amounts so I dont worry about it too much. that being said i am very careful about peanuts and would never treat it that way..
------------------
Lalow
James 5 yrs, NKA
Ben 4 yrs, PA and MA

Peanut Free Store

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