Middle school after home schooling

Posted on: Tue, 02/27/2007 - 9:01pm
bbm68's picture
Offline
Joined: 02/27/2007 - 09:00

Hi I am new and posted under intro yesterday. I am having so much trouble with my son's principal. Ds is almost 13 and has been homeschooled until this year due to his severe peanut anaphlaxis. I thought it would be easier in the older grades. Wrong. He has now developed smell reactions that include eyes and nose as well as facial hives and red face symptoms. We have just been diagnosed with allergy induced asthma . I have supplied all information from dr. We had a teachers,parent and rent a nurse meeting on mon. to discuss the issues of reeces and snickers and other candy being sold and eaten in class. Then they swap papers for grading divide up into small groups to work together. The nurse claimed that his no exposure at home was responsible for all this years illnesses and that with time all of this daily exposure would start to desensitive and his immunity would build up to this allergy. We all no this is incorrect. One of his teachers mentioned that he didn't look so good in her class ,red face, was told there wasn't any peanut food on menu that day. When I had him called up front he had facial hives as well as on the back of his neck. Found out yesterday during science lab that he ccouldn't attend that the 7th graders had used lab on monday for a peanut experiment. His teacher had room checked out before he entered and discovered nuts were still everywhere. She is very concerned and aware of his allergy.However his principal states that ds is at the age to take responsibility for his allergy. That he needs this training for the work field. I feel that I need to step up and become homeland security and have these threats removed, and to make sure his safety is first. Sorry that I have went on and on. Dealing with the school system is so new to me. I don't want to cause issues where they become so mad that his safety is ignored but on the other hand I almost feel he sees this as a joke .. Call a meeting on this subject and allow 7th graders to do experiments on the same day.Any advice will be greatly appreciated. Thanks

Posted on: Wed, 02/28/2007 - 12:22am
anonymous's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Don't have a lot of time, so my answers will be brief.
Biggest problem sounds like they are just not educated about PA. I would look into finding someone reputable who can do that ASAP.
Do you have a 504 in place for your child? Sounds like you don't. There are countless posts about 504s here in the Schools thread. Here is one link that explains 504s.
[url="http://www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/504faq.html"]http://www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/504faq.html[/url]
You may need to remove your son from the school until the facility is made safe for him to attend - this is possible under the 504. Another member here is facing this very issue right now - read the thread "What do you do when a 504 is violated?" (Or something close to that.)
I wish you all the luck in the world. Take care of your son!!!!!
[This message has been edited by Lam (edited February 28, 2007).]

Posted on: Wed, 02/28/2007 - 12:40am
Gail W's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/06/2001 - 09:00

have you asked for a Section 504 Designation?
I see from your profile that you live in Georgia. Here's some interesting info from the Georgia state board of ed webiste:
[url="http://public.doe.k12.ga.us/pea_policy.aspx?PageReq=PEAEquity"]http://public.doe.k12.ga.us/pea_policy.aspx?PageReq=PEAEquity[/url]
[i]Equity
Federal law prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color or national origin (Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964); sex (Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 and the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Applied Technology Education Act of 1990); or disability (Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990) in educational programs or activities receiving federal financial assistance. Pursuant to this, the following information is provided for use by Georgia public school systems, parents, students, and other interested parties.

Posted on: Wed, 02/28/2007 - 1:47am
Carefulmom's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/03/2002 - 09:00

I agree, get a 504 ASAP. What they are doing is illegal. The law is on your ds`s side. The school is required to make it safe for him to attend. However, it probably will not happen without a 504. The line about the child needing to take responsibility for his allergy makes me sick. It is a cop out answer for the school to use as an excuse for not making the school safe for the pa child to attend. By the way, my pa/milk allergic dd is in 6th grade, public school. She has had a 504 since kindergarten.

Posted on: Wed, 02/28/2007 - 4:33am
luvmyboys's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/25/2006 - 09:00

Another suggestion...help your dr write a letter saying your child qualifies for 504 designation...examples here:
[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum7/HTML/002246.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum7/HTML/002246.html[/url]
then walk into the school letter in hand and ask for the paperwork to evaluate for 504 designation. They must by law convene the 504 committee and consider your case.
Don't ask about 504...they may try to dissuade you. Read up and politely tell them you are requesting it (whether they like it or not).
Luvmyboys

Posted on: Thu, 03/01/2007 - 12:48am
bbm68's picture
Offline
Joined: 02/27/2007 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by luvmyboys:
[b]Another suggestion...help your dr write a letter saying your child qualifies for 504 designation...examples here:
[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum7/HTML/002246.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum7/HTML/002246.html[/url]
then walk into the school letter in hand and ask for the paperwork to evaluate for 504 designation. They must by law convene the 504 committee and consider your case.
Don't ask about 504...they may try to dissuade you. Read up and politely tell them you are requesting it (whether they like it or not).
Luvmyboys[/b]
Thanks so much everyone. His allergist had their director call the school so they could go to them and do a training . Haven't heard from school as to how that went over. I will be making copies of the dr. letters however his dr has sent two letters already; one was written on prescription pad as how he was to avoid peanuts at all cost. Thanks again

Posted on: Thu, 03/01/2007 - 3:16am
Corvallis Mom's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

just linking to your other thread:
[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum17/HTML/001382.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum17/HTML/001382.html[/url]

Posted on: Thu, 03/01/2007 - 7:55am
Jenna's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/09/2000 - 09:00

Posted earlier but don't see it so will post again. Just wanted you to know, bbm that we have been down this same road. We have a middle school child and even though we have had a 504 since 1st grade, the middle school was very resistant to change. They initially told us they would make no accomodations at all because it was time for him to be responsible for himself. (He is also airborne sensitive.)
I would advise you to stay strong in your discussions with them. They would probably like you to give up, hoping that you will decide it is not worth it. You have the law behind you. They have to provide a safe environment and have to make the school safe enough for your child to attend. Pursue your 504 and involve your Dept of Ed if you need to. (We had to have the Dept of Ed write two letters to the school district basically telling them to change their lack of cooperation.)
I have often tried to remember what they say: if you don't fight for your child, who is going to. Hang in there.

Posted on: Thu, 03/01/2007 - 8:15am
anonymous's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Caught this in yet another read-through the other day: (From the link I provided above)
--------------------------------------------
"14. Does the nature of services to which a student is entitled under Section 504 differ by educational level?
Yes. Elementary and secondary recipients are required to provide a free, appropriate public education to qualified students with disabilities. Such an education consists of regular or special education and related aids and services designed to meet the individual educational needs of students with disabilities as adequately as the needs of students without disabilities are met.
At the postsecondary level, the recipient is required to provide students with appropriate academic adjustments and auxiliary aids and services that are necessary to afford an individual with a disability an equal opportunity to participate in a school's program. Recipients are not required to make adjustments or provide aids or services that would result in a fundamental alteration of a recipient's program or impose an undue burden."
------------------------------------------
What I'm concerned about is the very last phrase: "... or impose an undue burden."
Is that a loophole????

Posted on: Thu, 03/01/2007 - 8:58am
bbm68's picture
Offline
Joined: 02/27/2007 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by Lam:
[b]Caught this in yet another read-through the other day: (From the link I provided above)[/b]
Isn't postsecondary after high school? I am confused. ds already feels like he is a burden. what can I ask for at this age level in a 504 plan? Thanks

Posted on: Thu, 03/01/2007 - 10:55am
FromTheSouth's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/01/2000 - 09:00

I wish I could offer some advice but instead I think I will learn from you. I've h.s.ed my p.a/tree-nut allergic child from kinder. to 8th grade and she may want to go to high school next year...so I will likely be in the same situation you find yourself.
I don't buy the line that h.s.ing can make a child more sensitive because of too little exposure to what is a life-threatening allergen.
Please keep us posted.

Pages

Peanut Free Store

More Articles

There are many reasons why you may want to substitute almond flour for wheat flour in recipes. Of course, if you have a...

Are you looking for peanut-free candies as a special treat for a child with...

Do you have a child with peanut allergies and an upcoming birthday? Perhaps you'd like to bake a...

Most nut butters provide all the same benefits: an easy sandwich spread, a great dip for veggies, a fun addition to a smoothie. But not...

Do you have a sweet tooth and more specifically a chocolate craving? Those with peanut allergies must...