medic alert braclets

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I tried to search , becuase I know I saw this before...My son PA egg allergic is almost 3. I haven't purchased a medica alert bracelet because he's only with me or in day care (and they all know him and our emergency plan) plus I thought he's whine and pull it off. Any way, yesterday his class mingled with the older kids and the center put yellow bracelets with red lettering on the children with food allergies...My son was so proud, he showed EVERYONE we saw that evening and said"eggs and peanuts" not okay for Alex!! I'm not sure what it means to him but HEY, I'm thinking now is a good time to purchase one. Does anyone already have one? I LOVE this 3 year old stage, he's riot. He also told everyone who would listen that beans were okay for Alex and make his daddy toot! I guess I need to watch what I say!!

On Jul 12, 2000

Dit, I didn't get my son's MedicAlert bracelet until he was starting school last September because, like you, he was always with me. He would have been 3-3/4 years old when he got it and we explained what it was, etc. and that he can never take it off and whatever and I've had to problems with him whatsoever with it. The only mistake I made, and I'm not clear if it is a serious one or not, only realized it after reading on this site; rather than putting "anaphylactic" on it (which he is), I put "severe peanut allergy". I also put that he carries an epipen. The next time he gets one, I'll make sure to change the engraving on the back to read "anaphylactic". So, if your son is, make sure to have that put on and also if he carries an epipen have that put on too. I've found them wonderful to deal with over the past year almost now. You can phone and update whenever there are medication changes, etc. and you get an updated wallet card. I always photocopy this and give it to my son's teacher. I know there is another thread on here too about it, but sometimes it's so hard to find what you know you've read! Best wishes. Oh, also, if you watch the nonutsfor me.com animated cartoon on the monitor with your little guy, he'll see Noah describe his bracelet and how he never takes it off and why. My son was really pleased with that part.

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On Jul 12, 2000

Something to consider about the word "anaphylaxis": non-medical people may not know what that word means. I worry about my son getting lost or otherwise separated from me (ie in an accident) and some well-meaning person offering him a cookie. I think most people know what "allergy" means, but there are surely people who DON't know what "anaphlaxis" means. And if he were having an allergic reaction, I would hope that an EMT would recognize his as allergic ones symptoms, without a bracelet specifically stating "anaphylaxis." Nancy

On Jul 12, 2000

Hi Dit just want to share with you our experience with the bracelet. I ordered one in the spring for my then 31/2year old son. Let me tell you, it has not come off since. Every one he meets he shows it to them and is very proud of it still. It is very durable and I have no worries as to him yanking it off. One factor of having the bracelet that I didn't expect is that people take his allergy much more serious. Even relatives are much more supportive in keeping him safe. It has just been wonderful. I hope you have as much success as we have!

------------------ melissa

On Jul 12, 2000

I got the medic alert bracelet for my pa son when he was not quite 2--I think maybe 21 or 22 months. Anyway, I slipped it on him when he was taking a nap. I knew exactly when he woke up because I heard, "Mooooommmmmyyyyy! There's something on my arm and it won't come off!!!" I'll never forget it. I just explained to him that it was for his peanut allergy. He loves to show it to people and tells them exactly what it says on the back. He just turned 3 and for the first time since he's been wearing it, he asked my husband tonight when his bracelet would come off. I think he's just at that stage where he's asking a lot of questions like why people die and why people have to be in the hospital and EXACTLY how does a baby come out of a mommy's tummy. I think he's seen too many episodes of General Hospital! Anyway, I think medic alert bracelets are a great idea "just in case" he ever is separated from me for any reason. Deanna

On Jul 12, 2000

Hi

I got my daughter's bracelet as soon as she was diagnosed with PA - about a year and a half ago. Rather than anaphylaxis, I chose to engrave "Life threatening peanut allergy - needs epipen". I just thought it would be easier for people who have never heard of anaphylaxis!

By the way, my daughter has never had a problem with her bracelet, but ALWAYS notices when she sees someone else with one. She is in a summer day camp now and loves her bracelet because she is the only kid allowed to wear jewellry!

Take care

deb

On Jul 14, 2000

dit: First of all I have to agree that this is the best age! I was laughing about the *toot* comment. They come up with some real winners! I got the velcro bands for my 3 yr old but she didn't like to wear them. I got 2 different colors. I think they measured too small. I then ordered the medic alert bracelet and at first she didn't like it but now she doesn't even mention it. A friend of mine is diabetic and wears one and I had asked her ahead of time to show my daughter her bracelet and my daughter was so excited to show my friend that she had one too.

She also got a thrill out of the little boy in the video with a bracelet like hers. And yes...I notice that it really does help validate the severity of the allergy.

I had inscribed on it "severely allergic to peanuts; carries epi-pen". I would imagine that the younger they are when they get one the easier it would be to get them used to it.

*Although I measured the Allerbands too small, the colors are bright and stand out more than the medic alert bracelets. They are attached to her little backpack that that she carries with her everywhere. Since they are velcro they can come off and an be put on another bag easily. One is purple with white writing and the other is bright pink with black writing. They're inscribed with "Peanut Allergy". And you can spot them a mile away!

[This message has been edited by Diane (edited July 25, 2000).]

On Jul 15, 2000

I didn't get my daughter's medic alert bracelet until last year when she started preschool (she was 4 then) as she was always with me. I did have to take out a few links, but I went to a jeweler who did it for nothing and then gave me back the extras and said to come back when she grew so he could put some back. We spent $5 extra and got a two-tone (gold,silver) one. She wears it 24/7. Although, with this summer heat, I would love to take it off her just when she's sleeping as she wakes up with an indentation on her arm, but I've tried, and all I got was broken fingernails! She is very proud of it (she calls it her 'special bracelet' and when she went for her Kindergarten screening last month, the teacher came and told me she was glad she had one as it will always remind her about her allergy. Her bracelet is engraved "Allergic to Peanuts, All nuts, Carries EpiPen and Benadryl". I'm wondering now if this is sufficient, alerting medical personnel that it is 'life-threatening' and not just a rash-type allergy. The operator at Medic Alert said "that's what EpiPen means, and anaphylactic was too many letters." Maybe just the fact that she is wearing one is enough. Just a thought, annother word for anaphylaxis that non-medical people would understand might be 'life threatening'.

On Jul 16, 2000

I got my son his when i found out he is PA. It states something like allergic to peanuts and bi-products carries epi-pen. we had to take it to the jeweler to have links removed as well. he is now 19 months and has had it for about 4-5 months. at times it is a good conversation starter which gives me the opportunity to educate people. he too is normally only with us or daycare..but i feel better getting it. i think it also validates the allergy for some people.. if it is serious enough for a bracelet type thing. he hated it at first but i think it ok with it now, sometimes he still tries to bite it off!!

On Jul 17, 2000

Have any of you had a problem with lost bracelets? My son has lost his and he had it only for a few months. My sister inlaws daughter has lost hers. Did you do anything to reenforce it? We welded the bigger rings but that obviously did not help.

I know have opted for the sport bracelet. Does anyone else have one and does it wear better then the regular bracelet?. We have not received it yet.

My son's is engraved, allergic to nut products, has epi-pen and benadryl.

On Jul 18, 2000

Thanks so much for everyone's input. He tried to pull off the yellow bracelet to put in on Barney and got it stuck and freaked out. But I do believe it is time to get one. Thanks again.

On Jul 18, 2000

My four year old son just started wearing his about three months ago. I explained to him that he could never take it off but that it would help protect him if he ever had an allergic reaction while Mommy or Daddy was not around. He said, "Okay, but what day can I take it off?" When I said never he let the subject drop. That night when his Dad got home he said, "Daddy, I can not take this bracelet off until the day I go to Heaven." It made tears welt up in my eyes and still does. His bracelet says Anaphylactic to Peanuts/All Nuts. It also says something about Epi but not sure what since he is not here for me to read.

On Jul 18, 2000

naomi, I'm bawling my eyes out! What a sweet child They seem to handle this so much better than we do! Perhaps our kids will grow up to be sensative and accepting of people with special needs?

On Jul 18, 2000

Howdy, My son has been wearing a bracelet for 7 years. We put it on him when he was three. He is very active and it has come off when climbing a tree, etc. We originally put it on him so that he could show it to an adult who wanted to give him a cookie. We thought it would support his refusing to eat something. DO get a bracelet for the EGG allergy NOW. There are anesthesias (propofol) used that are egg based and dangerous to our egg allergy kids. If you were in an accident and unable to explain egg allergies it could be fatal. We found this out as my son was going into surgery and the nurse was not at all concerned about food allergies. The anesthesiologist came in and was adamant that our son wear his bracelet at ALL times as propofol was frequently used and he would have used it had I not pointed out the egg allergy to him. MedicAlert is great to work with and I highly recommend them.

On Jul 18, 2000

TAMI, I agree about the importance of MedicAlert. I didn't realize how an egg allergy can be severly affected by medicine. My son is severly allergic to medications containing sulfur, so I agree that it should be worn at all times, just in case.

On Jul 19, 2000

fermin: we have never had a problem with it coming off. On the contrary I tried to take it off because I wanted to put it on my daughter's left hand instead of her right. I noticed that being right-handed it seemed to be in the way when she did something. Not really *in the way* but just always *there*. I tried to unlock it and had trouble. She said it hurt because I was pulling so hard. So she said let's do it this way...and she struggled with it but was able to slide it off her hand. We slid it on her left hand and I think before long she'll grow and we won't be able to do that anymore. I shook her hand and it just hangs on it. It can't slip off. I wonder how your son's and your neice's bracelet was lost...if it broke at a link or slipped off or if the lock opened?

What is the sports bracelet like? Is it from the Medic-alert Company.?

On Jul 19, 2000

My son's medic alert bracelet has come off several times and we have lost 2 of them. This is a very active 10 year old and he has been wearing them for 7 years. I don't think our track record is too bad. the bracelts do not come loose at the catch. They have a safety link near the emblon and this is designed to come loose and separate rather than stay on and injure the wearer. You can have these links soldered shut. We have not done this as we feel is is better to lose the bracelet than have Matt's wrist damaged. Tami

On Jul 21, 2000

Tami & Diane, My son's fell off several times because the links opened up and the same happened to my niece's. In both cases we soldered the end links. My nieces was lost before they soldered the links on her replacement bracelet. She has not lost it since. My son's was lost after we soldered it. He is active but I was hoping that these would last a lot longer than a few months (in my son's case). $50.00 every few months is a lot, but I would buy them anyway.

We just got the sport bracelet in the mail and yes it is from the Medical-Alert company. It seems to be fine. My husband thinks that there will be less tension on the links then there must have been on the last one.

The pendant is attached on either end by elastics and those are sewn into a soft nylon wrist band. It secures with a plastic piece on either end that fits one into the other. Similar to a brief case lock except this is plastic. It looks as though it will not agitate him.

On Jul 21, 2000

Just received the Medic Alert bracelet we had ordered. We HAD clearly specified "Life threatening peanut allergy" for the condition and they instead put "severe peanut allergy" on bracelet. I've not yet been able to talk to Medic Alert about this. Has anyone else had the problem of having their specified message changed? Thanks. EB

On Jul 23, 2000

Just my two cents worth but I would not wait until a child was school age to start him/her wearing the Medic Alert bracelet. Even if the child is "always" with a knowledgeable adult, unexpected things occur. A child gets lost in a store, car accidents, etc. How many well-meaning adults would offer a child cookies or ice cream as a way of calming them down in an upsetting situation? My son has been wearing his bracelet since he was 22 months, he is five now. Only one has broken, the others were replaced because he outgrew them.

On Jul 26, 2000

So, should I put anaphylactic on his next bracelet, or is the "severe allergy to peanuts" and "carries epipen" clearer for people? It looks as though most people above have not put anaphylactic on it, but the reason I questioned this was because I actually had an e-mail from Chris at this site when I first starting posting on this site asking me if I had had "anaphylactic" put on my son's bracelet. I'm not clear why he asked me that. Maybe we could ask him what he has on his daughter's bracelet and why? Now, I'm re-thinking it again although I suspect it will be a little while before he gets another one. Also, MedicAlert here in Canada anyway, has just come out with a product brochure. They have a costly epipen holder but they also have MedicAlert frisbees and stuff. It was interesting to see.

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On Jul 27, 2000

Cindy, I think what you have is appropriate. Remember that if your child gets lost or is left with someone, people tend to understand the simple things. I can't even spell anaphalactic properly and maybe a few years ago I might not have even truly understood it, had my son not tested allergic to peanuts.

Communications courses teach you to stick to simple words now a days. If you get caught up in big words your meaning may be lost. You don't want that to happen in this case.

That is just my opinion.

On Jul 27, 2000

I presently have a dog tag engraved with "anaphylactic allergy to nuts" tied to my toddler's shoe. When I went to the key place to have it engraved, the guy that waited on me had never heard the word anaphylactic. I have to admit, I had never heard it either until my son experienced it. You people have all convinced me, though, that I need to get a medic alert bracelet and I called the other day and ordered a brochure.

On Aug 1, 2000

AFter reading this thread, I have decided to get my 16 month old daughter a medic alert bracelet. We are going on vacation and she will be in a child's activity club. ALthough they say that they put a bracelet on the child that states any allergy..I just think I should have the bracelet in case. She is with me all the time now...except of course when my husband and I go out...I do have a question though: For those of you that have the bracelet on your young ones now, why do you have the bracelet say "carries EpiPen and Benedryl"..Does your child at a young age really carry the EpiPen/Benedryl on himself/herself. My daughter is only 16 months (and walking) and I think that statement seems misleading in that she is not carrying around an EpiPen...I like the peson who posted "Life Threatening peanut allergy -NEEDS EpiPen" Any comments?

On Aug 1, 2000

I think after reading even more posts I'm really comfortable with not having anaphylactic on my son's bracelet. I certainly would not have known previously what it meant and "carries epipen" says it all. As far as his saying "carries epipen", should he be in a situation where it would need to be read, I would either be with him with the epipen with me or if he is at school he would have the epipen in his fanny pack. So, when he's not with me, he does actually carry it himself although this does not imply to anyone at the school that he should be responsible for administering it to himself! I just received a brochure from MedicAlert with a bunch of new products that they have including a very expensive (to me) epipen holder, but also T-shirts and frisbees and stuff. It was kinda interesting to look at although I don't think I would ever purchase any of it. I do know that I have to find a proper epipen holder for him as the epipen he has been carrying in his fanny pack all this past school year came home with the case completely crushed! You can order new cases for them too from the drug company that makes them. Also, it's too bad that the moderator couldn't somehow put all MedicAlert information into one post - I know Dit when she started this thread was having a hard time finding the other threads, and that is true, but it would be nice to now see all of the information consolidated. Oh well. Best wishes everyone!

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On Aug 2, 2000

I think the bracelet should be bought as soon as the child is diagnosed. My son has had it scence he was 17 months and he is very used to this. people look at it and understand more fully that it is serious. It helped in Greece because it is hard for me to communicate and they said allergy is a Greek word and they understood the seriousness of the allergy when they saw it. My son will never know anything different because it never comes off. I think he likes it to. I am a stay home mom and I do disagree with other moms who choose not to put a bracelet on a small child because they feel they are with them all the time. Do you understand moms and dads that it is for the day that you have not planned ahead. This allergy is still knew to my family and friends. My best friend was about to give my son a taste of her peanut butter icecream and then she saw the bracelet. She felt awful that she had forgotten and was about to do something with me standing right there and not ask me first. The bracelet stopped her. I think I should have put allergy to peanut on the bracelet along with the nut allergy. I did not put on epi-pen needed. His reaction was hives when he touched the peanut butter. I don't know what to expect when he eats the peanut butter.

On Aug 2, 2000

ajas_folks - I just called Medic Alert and wanted to get "Life-threatening Peanut ALlergy = Needs EpiPenJr." They told me that they can't do that b/c they have specified inscriptions for this allergy. I have to get "SEverly allergic to Peanuts -- May need EpiPenJr." That is why you probably got the change in what you had told them you wanted. I think it is ridiculous! They also have an inscription with anaphaxlis...(i can't even spell)...The average Joe on the street would not even know what this means!!! Life threatening is much better...I am upset that they can't put what I want and I am paying for it!! They say it has to do with what the EMT recognizes around the country! Are you telling me that they wouldn't understand "life-threatening"!!! I am venting..this upsets me!!

On Aug 2, 2000

Just yesterday I ordered by mail a new Medic Alert necklace. On the order form it did not ask for the inscription, but I wrote a big note on it "engrave this--Severe Peanut Allergy--Carries Eip-pen--Call 911". After reading these posts I called Medic Alert and asked why they would change the wording on an order. The woman I talked to said there is a certain medical protocol that they must follow, but that they would for sure call you first before changing your wording. She said what I had asked for should be OK. If you send in an order and they change the inscription without calling and explaining to you first, I would definitely call back to see why.

On Aug 2, 2000

I just wanted to follow up with my previous posting re: medic alert bracelets and what they ALLOW you to put on it. As stated, I wanted "Life-threatening allergy to peanuts - may need EpiPenJr." I was told that I could have "Severely allergic" or something with anaphalytic (i forget the exact wording). I was furious as I don't like the "a" word..as the average person doesn't understand this and quite frankly I did not either until my child had a reaction to peanuts (by the way, I even have my masters!). I think (and this is my own opinion) that "severely" can be intrepreted differently (for one it might mean Hives and another gasping for breath) ..so I opted for life-threatening..which is what this PA really is...ANyhow, I spoke to a supervisor (Louise) who then had me talk to someone above her (Nurse- Mary Teague)..and I had to convince them of this after 20 minutes on the phone. My issue is that if my daughter gets lost (she is with me all the time) or is in this baby club (at Club med..our vacation)..one knows that this PA is a life-threatening allergy. Anyhow, I am rambling...but if anyone does have concerns in the future, talk to Mary at Medic Alert. Also, ajas-folks, call and speak to Mary Teague if you haven't already resolved your Medic Alert bracelet problem (you said they sent you something different on the incsription than what you had ordered). Oh, the nurse did question me about if someone would know what to do when they saw this bracelet...I told her, I would NOT expect that anyone would know what to do, except NOT give peanuts and if my daughter was having a reaction I assume anyone would call 911. I bought this bracelet as a warning or precautionary bracelet or reminder of her allergy if my daughter is with anyone other than everyone who already knows. It doesn't come with detail instructions attached to it!!!

On Aug 2, 2000

Thanks for that info kathryn65. I got the brochure from MedicAlert in the mail and had no idea they put restrictions on what can be engraved. I will speak with Mary Teague at MedicAlert when I order it. I want the same as you want engraved "Life Threatening". I was holding off ordering because we have a ped. appt. this Monday and an allergist appt. the following Monday and I wanted to get both their opinions.

[This message has been edited by Heather (edited August 02, 2000).]

[This message has been edited by Heather (edited August 02, 2000).]

On Aug 2, 2000

Heather- Let me know what your doctors say. My allergist, the one that gave me the brochure, said he didn't think it was necessary until my daughter started preschool. I actually agreed with him as she is with us all the time (again, except when we have a babysitter). However, now I have a change of heart..given that I want to be prepared in case for some reason she is not with us or rather as a reminder for someone that she has this allergy. Take care.

On Aug 3, 2000

**!! You should definitely get a MedicAlert bracelet NOW. I had the misfortune of being in a car wreck (with PA child in car)!

[This message has been edited by ajas_folks (edited March 12, 2007).]

On Aug 3, 2000

I decided to wait until my son started school to get MedicAlert bracelet for the same reason "he was always with me". In retrospect, I wish I would have gotten one sooner. He was 13mo when we found out. By the time I got his bracelet when he started kindergarten, we had a terrible time because "boys don't wear bracelets", "It looks stupid", "It bothers my arm", "Kids will tease me", etc, etc, etc. I wish I had gotten one for him when he was a toddler, so it would have been all he knew rather than introducing it when he was older.

On Aug 3, 2000

ajas-folks..did you read my posts on August 2, 2000? .....I got a bracelet and had the same issue you had about getting ingraved on it what I wanted..Read my 3 posts.....I finally got what I wanted inscribed on it!

On Aug 3, 2000

I just came back from the allergist and picked up a Medic Alert brochure. My son's allergies have changed (not the PA) and his other one outdated. He complains about the bracelet a lot so I was thinking about a necklace. I worry about him getting caught on something on the playground. He is 8. I also saw a new item in the brochure. It is like a watchband. It is silver and would stretch over your wrist. I think you can picture it. Obviously it is removeable but I think he would keep it on. Has anyone tried one of these type? If so, how have you liked it. Do you think it would be considered girlish? 8 year olds are concerned about these things. Thanks!

On Aug 3, 2000

PattyR, my son has the exact band that you are talking about. It is great. It does not irritate him and he has problems with eczema. He plays soccer and it is great for that. He is 5yrs old. I would recommend it over the traditional braclet.

On Aug 3, 2000

Thanks for your response. I think we'll give it a try!

On Aug 5, 2000

kathryn65 -- thanks for info regarding our Medic Alert bracelet engraving problems. I will call them Monday (Aug 7) & post results here. Thanks again. EB

On Aug 5, 2000

I personally would not put Anaphalactic on the braclet = for fear that people would not know what that means. Before all this I did not know that word. Severe peanut allergy is a lot clearer to most of the population.

On Aug 5, 2000

We had specified "life-threatening" because our child's peanut allergy is exactly that. We felt that "severe allergy" does not do justice. "Severe allergy" says to me -- ok, this child could get very ill. "Life-threatening" goes directly to the urgency and says to me -- geez, this child could die! EB

On Aug 5, 2000

An idea i just read in the FAN newsletter. When the kids are playing sports or something like that cover the bracelet with a sweat ban, then it wouldnt get caught on stuff. what they didnt mention but i would do is write on the sweat band, medic alert bracelet underneath or something like that.

On Aug 5, 2000

ajas-folks. Your reasoning on "life-threatening" is EXACTLY why I pushed so hard at Medic Alert (went thru 3 people) to get that engraved. "Severe" is open to interpretation and "life-threatening" is NOT. When my daughter was diagnosed PA..the ped said "you know this is a life-threatening allergy"....EXACTLY MY POINT!!! By the way..I got my bracelet today and it says what I wanted "Life Threatening Peanut Allegy. May Need EpiPenJr." Let me know if you get your bracelet changed and how the conversations go with MedicAlert.

On Aug 5, 2000

We use first aid tape to tape over my daughter's bracelet when she plays soccer. The kind of tape that you would use to tape up a strained ankle or something. Then we do write on top of it medic alert.

On Aug 8, 2000

Thanks to all for the help regarding bracelet inscription problems. I spoke with Louise at Medic Alert today & they will put my original wording request of "Life threatening peanut allergy" on a new bracelet & send it ASAP. They were most helpful & understood where we are coming from on this matter. Thumbs up to Medic Alert for working with us PA parents on this one. -- Sigh. Now if dealing with the airlines were only this easy. ;o) EB

On Aug 10, 2000

I had an experience last Friday that gave me complete confidence in the MedicAlert Bracelet!!! We were at the Baseball game and I went to the first aid area with my PA daughter. (She was fine, but I had a headache and needed tylenol [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img] ) As soon as we entered the area a paramedic asked 'Does your daughter have allergies?' I was quite surprised and asked how he knew that and he said he saw the bracelet right away. After we sorted out that we were there for me and not her, he explained that the first thing they check for is a MEDICALERT tag - first wrists then neck then ankles. He read her bracelet and asked if I carried epinephrine for her and informed me that they also carry injectible epinephrine as well. This experience showed me that the medical staff at the ball park are well prepared and knowledgeable about allergic reactions and also that the MedicAlert bracelet is priceless!

By the way I always wondered if they would know it was a MedicAlert bracelet, because she has the 'sport' model and it sometimes gets twisted around so the tag isn't showing on top, but the paramedic said they are aware of the new types and have seen plenty of them.

On Aug 11, 2000

The person I dealt with at MedicAlert was very helpful. My daughter is only allergic to peanuts and not other nuts (she's had almonds, pecans and walnuts with no problem in the past). However, I wasn't sure what to put on the bracelet because sometimes other nuts are contaminated with peanuts. The person kept asking me if I wanted to say PEANUTS AND ALL NUTS, which I didn't feel comfortable with, because she's NOT allergic to all nuts. She finally asked me if it was okay to put LIFE-THREATENING ALLERGY. PEANUTS AND BY-PRODUCTS. NEEDS EPI-PEN. I thought that was just perfect. It's clear on the bracelet that her PA is severe, but also makes people think that maybe she shouldn't have ANY nuts (what the heck are by-products anyway?!) without it being a falsehood.

We just received the bracelet today, and after 5 minutes of wearing it, my 3 year old daughter wanted to take it off. It is difficult for them to have to wear something dangly when they're not used to it, but I think she'll accept it in time.

On Aug 12, 2000

Carley's Mom, please post and let me know how you made out with her wearing it. We're in the process of getting one for our 3 year old. Three is such a cool age, but very trying at times.

On Aug 12, 2000

Hi, I have not been following this thread recently but noticed above that someone was recommending soldering the links so the bracelet doesn't come off. Please don't do that. Medic Alert does not recommend it. It is for safety reasons so that if the bracelet gets caught in playground equipment or machinery then it will not pull the arm in but will easily disengage. Better to lose the bracelet than the arm. I had the sports bracelet for my son but its clasp mechanism easily came undone and ultimately he lost it so we are back to the chain link one. The watchband style sounds interesting. I am going to see if it is available in Canada.

On Aug 16, 2000

Hi dit - My daughter has been wearing her bracelet almost a week now and she barely notices it anymore. After the first day (in which she slid it over her wrist three times!) she didn't try to remove it anymore. It's like she's resigned to wearing it already. Also, I showed her the website (edited by the office; old url removed as that web site address is no longer used or owned by the book company that published the no nuts for me book. The book company's web site on 01/08/2007 [url="http://www.tumblebooks.com"]http://www.tumblebooks.com[/url] ) with Noah wearing his bracelet all the time, which she really liked. Good luck!

On Aug 17, 2000

Both the pediatrician and the ped. allergist think my 18 month old is too young for a Medic Alert bracelet. Allergist said if my son gets a bracelet, he'll be the youngest patient in the practice to have one. Both doctors are concerned that the bracelet will be a choking hazard (both have seen my little monkey in action). To those of you who have bracelets - how much of a choking hazard are they really? Also some disagreement on what to have written on the bracelet, I think I'll go with "Life threatening allergy to nuts, needs EpiPen Jr." What do you guys think of that?

On Aug 17, 2000

Hi Heather - I agree that the MedicAlert bracelet could be a choking hazard if the baby or toddler managed to get it off. The only reason my daughter (3 years old) has one is because she's starting preschool this fall and this will be the first time she will be out of my sight. If you are going to be with your child all the time (or only leave your child with trusted people who understand the allergy), then you don't really need the bracelet yet. You could still become a member of MedicAlert without ordering the bracelet. They will send you a card listing the allergy and emergency procedures, as well as contacts (ie. doctors phone #). You would keep this card with you at all times, in case you were ever (heaven forbid) in a car accident, and couldn't tell medics about the allergy. Once your little one is a bit older, and things aren't going in the mouth all time, then you can order the bracelet and MedicAlert already has your information. Just a suggestion - maybe MedicAlert can give you more information.

Also, about what you want to put on the bracelet when you get it - I have had people read what's on my daughter's (see above post) and they say it's very clear and concise. It's very similar to what you want to put on your childs bracelet. Go for it!

On Sep 13, 2000

Our daughter was just diagnosed with peanut allergy. She is 21 months old. I didn't think to get her a bracelet because she is always with my husband or I. Everyone else who takes care of her already knows. However since I've been reading more about it, she will be getting one as soon as possible. Thanks for the info about the inscription. I think "life-threatening peanut allergy - carries Epi-pen" is the way to go!

On Sep 14, 2000

I'm a 20 year old college kid who was diaganosed when I was about two. No biggie. But oddly enough, when I was visiting my parents this summer, my mom brought up getting me a medical alert bracelet for the first time. Does anyone think this is necessary for an adult?

(My last allergy was in February. Very bad. But, now I have an epi-pen and have trained my close friends and family to use it....just in case.)

On Sep 14, 2000

Hi Kim - yes I think it's necessary for an adult. If you become incapcitated with a reaction, how can you tell people what is wrong with you, and what to do about it? There are also necklaces available that you can tuck inside your shirt if you don't want a bracelet. Also, stretchy "sport" bands are available if you don't like dangly jewelry. Check the medicalert website, or call their 1-800 # for a brochure. You'd be surprised at the selection they have. Take care.

On Sep 21, 2000

Aaarggh! I'm so frustrated! I spent a lot of time here reading all the posts on this topic and deciding whether or not to get my son (23 mos) a medic alert bracelet and then once I decided yes - figuring out exactly what wording to put on it. I read through all of the discussions on life-threatening versus anaphylaxis and agree with you all 100% The common person on the street may or may not know what anaphylaxis means... his PA allergy is more than "severe" it's life-threatening. I saw Cayly's Mom's post and really liked the wording that you decided on. Since it was suggested to you by the folks at Medica Alert I thought GREAT no problem getting this inscribed... WRONG! I just got the bracelet today and they did not inscribe what I requested! I requested exactly what Cayly's Mom had inscribed: LIFE THREATENING ALLERGY. PEANUTS AND BY-PRODUCTS. MAY NEED EPI-PEN JR. It came back inscribed: ANAPHYLAXIS TO PEANUTS AND BY-PRODUCTS. TREAT WITH EPI-PEN JR. No conultation with me - it was just sent this way. What's with these people? I plan to call them tomorrow a.m. and ask why they did this and request that they send another bracelet with the wording I gave them. I'm glad I read all the posts here to give me some ammunition when I talk with them!

Thanks for letting me vent my frustration! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

On Sep 21, 2000

LGraham2 - I don't blame you for being frustrated - those bracelets are expensive. I can't believe they would send something you didn't even order - it does make you feel like they're not listening! Good luck getting your new "free" bracelet - keep the old one as a spare! Take care.

On Sep 22, 2000

I understand your frustration with med alert. I have no idea how many employees they have, but from my experiences with them I have found that one of their employees is very difficult to work with. I can recognize her voice and when I hear it I know that I might as well hang up and call some other time. I also know that the other person I have talked to there could not have been more helpful. She was very kind and understanding and went out of her way to help. My advice would be to call and try to find someone who is willing to listen to your concerns. If you can't get anywhere with the person you are talking to, ask to talk to someone else. There are some very nice people there who really do care.

On Sep 23, 2000

See my post above about dealing with Medic Alert & the bracelet correction. I spoke with Louise at Medic Alert (per suggestion from another board posting) & we had a new bracelet within days. She seemed most understanding & apologetic. She asked me to return the "wrong" bracelet which I did in a postage-paid envelope they provided. Good Luck. EB

On Sep 23, 2000

It was me who suggested talking to Louise. I actually spoke with her after speaking with 2 others that were adament about NOT putting LIFE THREATENING. I almost was in tears after I had to explain why I wanted what I wanted "life-threatening allergy to peanuts. May need EpiPenJr." I was so upset b/c I am paying for the darn thing! Louise is a nurse on staff and after a long discussion, she agreed to put what I wanted...(I finally convinced her!!). I think they try to keep to a standard phrase so that the Medical community (the ambulance or hospital) would know what the allergy is...I am more concerned with what the average person on the street would understand. They are more likely to come in contact with my daughter. Anyhow, talk to Louise!!!

On Sep 24, 2000

Just in case anyone is not sure how to get in touch with MedicAlert, here are their web sites: Canada ([url]http://www.medicalert.ca[/url]) United States ([url]http://www.medicalert.org[/url]) If you want to know why their bracelets are different than ones you buy in the drug store, check out the article on Lookalikes at [url="http://www.cadvision.com/allergy/lookalikes.html."]http://www.cadvision.com/allergy/lookalikes.html.[/url]

On Sep 27, 2000

Hi, I just ordered a new medic alert bracelet for my 5 year old son. The Canadian organization now offers a Toronto Maple Leafs hockey team logo sports type band that has a velcro connection. We've decided to try it out as my son was wanting a change from the metal bracelet which at times irritated his arm (perhaps the beginning of a nickel sensitivity?). I'll let you know what we think of it when it arrives.

On Sep 27, 2000

I live in the US and was able to get the velco band from Canada. The US doesn't offer any small velcro bands. My son loved that band. I would take it off every night for his bath and eventually the velcro didn't hold together. You really don't need to remove it, it dries quickly. I'm sure your son will love it.

On Sep 27, 2000

Was it a problem getting the one from Canada if you live here in the US?

On Sep 28, 2000

It was very easy. But...the #800 will not work from the US. You need to call direct and that # is 1-416-696-0267.

On Oct 4, 2000

I just ordered a medic alert bracelet for my son. Even though both ped. and allergist say he's too young, my insticts tell me he needs one now. I was shaking the whole time I was on the phone with the woman and I'm still shaking - I don't know why. The bracelet will have "fatal allergy to nuts" engraved on it and I can expect it within 7 days.

On Oct 4, 2000

Hi, Troy's Maple Leaf hockey bracelet arrived and he loves it. We surprised Daddy who was expecting the usual kind and all in all it has been a good experience. The wording says Asthma, Anaphylactic Risk: Severe allergy to nuts and peanuts. It is well designed and I like it better than the sports bracelet which we lost because the velcro clasp is better than the snap clasp on the sports bracelet.

On Oct 5, 2000

My son is 4 and has been wearing a Medic Alert bracelet for his peanut allergy for almost a year now. We told him it was just like the one that Batman wears and he thought that was pretty cool. It worked for his Epi Pen belt as well - we told him that it was just like the belt that Batman and Superman wear, and he has been wearing it every day, including weekends since then!

On Oct 25, 2000

Well, I was on the fence about getting a bracelet or not for a long time. Finally got one and it has worked out great. My 22 month old hardly notices it. I think long sleeves have helped (out of sight out of mind). It does not seem to pose a choking hazard at all. I'm glad I did get the bracelet at such a young age and now he'll grow up with it and be used to it. Just wanted to pass this information on to other mothers who are on the fence about this decision.

On Oct 25, 2000

My son is also 22mo, but it's not me who is undecided...it's my hubby. lol I'm hoping to get him to read through this thread and some others on this issue and see if I can convince him. I want him to have one for two reasons. One, in case he and I are ever seperated. We go to soccer games every week and there are times when I let one of my younger brothers take him to the playground alone. And the second reason is for family. My mom, for one, still seems to think PA is 'no big deal'. Just don't give him peanuts or peanut butter. I agree that in some ways, PA is NOT a big deal (much better than having cancer or something!), but at the same time, it is MUCH more complicated than simply withholding peanuts and peanut butter. Especially since both of Matt's previous reactions were contact reactions. No ingestion. Oh, and I also prefer the wording "Life-threatening allergy to peanuts/nuts. Needs EpipenJr." =)

On Oct 25, 2000

I also wondered if and when my son (almost 3) should have a bracelet. After reading this and other threads, I decided to order him one. I told him about it to get him prepared. So far he is pretty excited. We'll see how he reacts once it's on him. I also recently bought the book "A Preschoolers Guide to Peanut Allergy". He loves the book and now tells me that he can't eat peanuts. He also got excited when he saw the child in the book wearing a bracelet.

For the record, I called MedicAlert last weekend and asked to speak to Louise. Someone posted earlier that they were able to get the wording they wanted through her. Louise was busy so the woman asked me why I needed her. I told her I wanted to have a particular wording on my bracelet. She said she could do that with no problem. She said MedicAlert recently added the option of saying "Life Threatening". Everything was going well and then we got disconnected. I called back and got someone else who told me I couldn't have the words I wanted. After pushing her pretty hard she realized that I could have "Life Threatening Allergy to Peanuts. May need EpiPenJr." It took awhile but we got there.

On Oct 27, 2000

I am happy that my sons medic alert bracelet arrived today...so is he! We don't have "fatal" or "life thretening" but what is inscribed says enough and the fact that a medic alert bracelet is worn also says a lot to first aiders.

This is what it says: BICUSPID AORTIC V./USES EPIPEN/SEVERE ALLERGY:PEANUTS FOOD ALLERGIES

As he also has a bicuspic aortic valve and other food allergies not severe. I think they have done well to fit all that info on that tiny bracelet! It is comforting to know he has it to identify his medical problems in my absense if ever needed.

On Oct 27, 2000

I think the earlier the kids get them, the leww they think about them and the more time they have to identify other kids around them that also wear them. If gives an opportunity for them to see they're not the only one and to talk about the allergy also.(My son got his 6 mo. ago when first diagnosed @ 29mo. At the time,(being so new), I had not thought about it and his bracelet states "Anaphylaxis to peanuts in any--form treat with Epipen jr." But now, I would put on the next one..."Life-threatening..." instead. I am a SAHM but it's good to be prepared for the *unknown*

On Nov 1, 2000

After reading this thread (when my 21 month old son was first diagnosed with PA, soy, egg, wheat,and tree nut allergies)I immediately ordered him a medic-alert bracelet. I think it's so important for all of the reasons that have been mentioned in this thread. I would also confirm in my experience that people sit up and notice the allergies more by seeing that bracelet...it is a reminder everytime he is seen by all those we know. If he is seperated from me somehow...and he's usually ALWAYS with me...I know that the bracelet will tell people what he cannot tell them himself.

I also heard that emergency personnel pay immediate attention to the bracelet, so you do not have to waste valuable time trying to convince a paramedic/nurse/doctor that your child has a life-threatening condition.

My son spent the first few days trying to pull off the bracelet and did some fussing about it. My husband and I immediately tried to make a positive association with it, i.e.,"Where's your bracelet? YEAH!!!!" (Clapping hands). Soon he would point, say "Yeah!!, and clap his hands too. Just a suggestion for those putting a bracelet on a very young baby or child...Medic-Alert bracelets are easy to order and they arrive quickly...If you haven' already, I would do it for your child, ASAP.

On Nov 1, 2000

After reading this thread (when my 21 month old son was first diagnosed with PA, soy, egg, wheat,and tree nut allergies)I immediately ordered him a medic-alert bracelet. I think it's so important for all of the reasons that have been mentioned in this thread. I would also confirm in my experience that people sit up and notice the allergies more by seeing that bracelet...it is a reminder everytime he is seen by all those we know. If he is seperated from me somehow...and he's usually ALWAYS with me...I know that the bracelet will tell people what he cannot tell them himself.

I also heard that emergency personnel pay immediate attention to the bracelet, so you do not have to waste valuable time trying to convince a paramedic/nurse/doctor that your child has a life-threatening condition.

My son spent the first few days trying to pull off the bracelet and did some fussing about it. My husband and I immediately tried to make a positive association with it, i.e.,"Where's your bracelet? YEAH!!!!" (Clapping hands). Soon he would point, say "Yeah!!, and clap his hands too. Just a suggestion for those putting a bracelet on a very young baby or child...Medic-Alert bracelets are easy to order and they arrive quickly...If you haven' already, I would do it for your child, ASAP.

On Mar 22, 2004

Just re-raising to coincide with Medic Alert bracelet discussion on Main board. EB

On Apr 10, 2004

We put a bracelet on our son when he was 14 months old. There are many companies other than medic alert that offer very child friendly and affordable pieces of jewelry. We got ours from a website called missruthieskids.com and we could engrave whatever we wanted. All medallions come with the medic alert symbol. There are lots of other fun things like dinosaurs, trucks, etc. to make it more friendly.

On Apr 12, 2004

Gee, I look at my posts here - that was almost 3 years ago. I can honestly say, 3 years later, I am glad I had DS wear a Medic Alert at such a young age. Now it is like a part of his body. When he had his Tonsils and Adenoids out about a month ago, they made him take off the bracelet. When he was in the recovery room, he was asking for it back. Just thought I'd throw this in in case anyone is on the fence about a Medic Alert at such a young age.

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