meal ideas

Posted on: Mon, 02/13/2006 - 10:34pm
tkmom's picture
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Joined: 01/23/2006 - 09:00

Just wondering if anyone has some good recipes/ideas they would like to share? My 14 month old will not meat, of any kind. He pretty much lives off of safe pasta and homemade sauce, homemade mac and cheese, homemade bread with veggies and cream sauce and he does well with fruits and veggies, cheese and yogurt. Any ideas would be helpful and greatly appreciated. My son is PA, TNA, EA.

I love this site!

Posted on: Mon, 02/13/2006 - 10:39pm
seanmn's picture
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Joined: 10/01/2003 - 09:00

Can you grind up meat and put it in the sauce so he does not know it's in there?
How about chicken, turkey or eggs for protein?

Posted on: Mon, 02/13/2006 - 11:23pm
shoshana18's picture
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Joined: 02/02/2005 - 09:00

when my 3 year old was just trying meat, she didn't like anything. and then i bought a package of jennie-o turkey breakfast sausage. 2 years later she is still gobbling (no pun intended) it up! i mix it in with pasta and broccoli for dinner, serve it with breakfast as a side...anything you can do with any other meat. it's really flavorful and much leaner than beef or pork.
maybe it's just her quirky tastebuds, but it's worth a try.

Posted on: Tue, 02/14/2006 - 1:47am
Corvallis Mom's picture
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Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

Sometimes cold, very plain, very lean meats are the way to go. I'm thinking plain sliced turkey breast lunchmeat. (Not from the deli, obviously.) And maybe a sauce to dip it in? My daughter liked to eat little "kabobs" she speared with cocktail toothpicks (under very close supervision, obviously) but she's a real carnivore. Ham cubes and pineapple or peach slices were her favorites.
Cold makes the "smell" less obvious and also reduces taste.
I don't really like meat either and never have. The smell of most of it is awful.

Posted on: Tue, 02/14/2006 - 2:05am
becca's picture
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Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

I make homemade popcorn chicken and the kids gobble it up. My dd is very sqeamish about meat, and she will eat a pound(well, alot) of these.
I use little pieces of chicken breast, basically diced into bite sized bits.
Dip it in milk(use egg if not allergic, but we are), then in a combo of corn meal and bread crumbs. Corn meal gives a great crunch. Season the crumbs as desired. I have found the kids like just salt and a touch of sugar in it. I might brine the chicken sometimes.
Fry in olive oil. So, it is fried, but in healthy fat, and I have skinny kids. Trouble is dh and I love em too! becca
[This message has been edited by becca (edited February 14, 2006).]

Posted on: Tue, 02/14/2006 - 5:30am
Edinview's picture
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Joined: 08/25/2003 - 09:00

If you want to try to add ground meat to the pasta sauce try this method that I just saw on a tv cooking show. Of course the method has been around forever, but I just saw it and tried it and found that the ground beef in my sauce was really tender.
The trick is that you don't brown the beef before adding the sauce, you put the beef into a pan, then add about 3/4 cups of milk to the pan and kind of boil the beef in the milk. Keep stirring as the whole thing heats so that the beef breaks apart.
I remember my son wouldn't eat anything like meat because it was so tough and dry, it would dry out as he chewed and chewed on it. So we tried cooking methods that yielded moist, tender meat such as braising, or using meat with more fat. KFC seemed to go down pretty well and we had many a chicken breast from there, just the meat part, not the skin.

Posted on: Tue, 02/14/2006 - 10:21am
krasota's picture
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Joined: 04/24/2000 - 09:00

Are you okay with legumes? Add lentils and beans and peas to any pasta dish you make. Peas go great in mac & cheese. Lentils are yummy in spaghetti. White beans go well with pasta, rice, and greens.
How about quinoa? It's tasty and nutritious. You can mix it with rice and beans for a hearty main dish.
ygg

Posted on: Tue, 02/14/2006 - 10:41am
dgood's picture
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Joined: 03/27/2004 - 09:00

Edinview, that is interesting how you cooked the beef. I want to try that! My kids are ok with beef sometimes but not consistently. How long did you simmer it in the milk?

Posted on: Wed, 02/15/2006 - 8:57pm
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Here's what I do for my 22 month old who is not a chewer (he's my 2nd "gagger")
I buy really premium ground meat, put it in a heavy saucepan and add water while stirring until it reaches the consistency of oatmeal (raw meat seen this way makes ME gag...) Then I put it over medium heat and stir it constantly until no longer pink. Shut it off, cool a bit, and pour meat and broth into dedicated icecube trays, cover with plastic and freeze. When frozen, unmold into freezer ziplocs.
These "meat cubes" will thaw in the microwave and can be mixed into just about anything: sauce, noodles, even oatmeal with steamed, chopped veggies.
You can do this with ground beef, turkey, or chicken.
Nice because no matter what the rest of the family is eating you'll always have some toddler protein in the freezer that takes 30 seconds to thaw!
Amy

Posted on: Wed, 02/15/2006 - 10:10pm
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

If you eat legumes, there are a lot of options: black beans in a tortilla (my kids like corn mixed with it), refried beans in taco shells (espec. good ith guacamole, and then you get a veg., too!), lentils, kidney beans, falafel (that's chick pea), etc. There's also couscous and quinoa. There are so many soy products out there: veggie burgers, veggie hot dogs, tofu mixed into stir fry or pasta sauce, etc. For lunch, I eat a lot of pita and hummus, slices of vegetarian lunch meats, yogurt with granola in it. I'm sure I am forgetting things, but that's a start.

Posted on: Thu, 02/16/2006 - 12:10am
cgroth's picture
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Joined: 01/25/2006 - 09:00

I am having a similar problem. My dd is 13 months and doesn't want to eat anything! Part of it is my fault. I knew she was going to have allergies & was afraid to give her table food. She is still eating lots of baby food veggies & fruit. I have tried fresh fruit & pasta but she spits it out. Sometimes she will eat little pieces of chicken, toast, dried fruit and of course cookies that I make. She is allergic to dariy, peanuts, egg, soy, corn & pork so we are VERY limited as to what she can eat! Any ideas? I would really like to get her off the baby food but she know's if she cries during meal time after refusing what I give her, I'll get it out.

Posted on: Thu, 02/16/2006 - 2:53am
toomanynuts's picture
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Joined: 08/23/2003 - 09:00

I would stick with the baby food and add the table foods as she is ready. As long as she getting what she needs she will be okay. I wouldn't hurry anything just go with her timing. Alot has to do with texture and taste and will happen but you don't have to rush the table foods. If the idea of buying baby much longer isn't a good idea you can just make it yourself with one of those baby grinders, that way you could make it fresh each time.
toomanynuts

Posted on: Thu, 02/16/2006 - 5:43am
cgroth's picture
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Joined: 01/25/2006 - 09:00

toomanynuts - thanks for the advice. When my older daughter was this age, she was eating what we ate, just smaller pieces. She has no allergies so it wasn't a big deal finding things for her. I guess I just need to relax & let dd set the pace. I should get a grinder & try to grind up some things so she can have a variety. Thanks!

Posted on: Fri, 02/17/2006 - 1:31pm
Lori Jo's picture
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Joined: 09/17/2003 - 09:00

Cgroth,
My twins were eating table food by 9-10 months (small bits, gummable, but definitely not just baby food.) They also both decided around 6 months they no longer wanted to nurse. Their younger sister wanted nothing to do with anything but nursing until she was 14 months, and almost overnite went to table food. She pretty much skipped babyfood altogether. Every kid is different. As long as yours is growing, I wouldn't worry about it. Though it is a pain making separate "baby" dinners. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
Lori Jo,
Rose, 7-31-02, PA
Beatrice & Georgia, 8-14-99

Posted on: Fri, 02/17/2006 - 9:23pm
pixiegirl's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/11/2005 - 09:00

Ah don't worry about it, kids change what they eat all the time... my daughter lived on mac and cheese for about 6 months. We went thru the no veggies at all stage.
There are so many other sources of protein that I'd not worry about it. I never once made food an issue in our home, there were no rules like: you have to sit at the table until you finish your XXXXXXXX. Or you can't have dessert until you eat your XXXX. Eating is supposed to be enjoyable, relaxing and family time and life is so stressful I refuse to have our meal times that way too.
My mother kept telling me that my daughter would grow up not liking a wide variety of foods. Well sorry mom, you were wrong about that. She is now 14 and eats almost anything... her friends think she is nuts for liking, things like artichoke, broccoli, cabbage, avocado, fish, etc.... most of her friends live on pizza but her father and I love food and just continued to eat a wide variety of healthy foods and she'd eventually try them.
Susan

Posted on: Mon, 02/13/2006 - 10:39pm
seanmn's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/01/2003 - 09:00

Can you grind up meat and put it in the sauce so he does not know it's in there?
How about chicken, turkey or eggs for protein?

Posted on: Mon, 02/13/2006 - 11:23pm
shoshana18's picture
Offline
Joined: 02/02/2005 - 09:00

when my 3 year old was just trying meat, she didn't like anything. and then i bought a package of jennie-o turkey breakfast sausage. 2 years later she is still gobbling (no pun intended) it up! i mix it in with pasta and broccoli for dinner, serve it with breakfast as a side...anything you can do with any other meat. it's really flavorful and much leaner than beef or pork.
maybe it's just her quirky tastebuds, but it's worth a try.

Posted on: Tue, 02/14/2006 - 1:47am
Corvallis Mom's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

Sometimes cold, very plain, very lean meats are the way to go. I'm thinking plain sliced turkey breast lunchmeat. (Not from the deli, obviously.) And maybe a sauce to dip it in? My daughter liked to eat little "kabobs" she speared with cocktail toothpicks (under very close supervision, obviously) but she's a real carnivore. Ham cubes and pineapple or peach slices were her favorites.
Cold makes the "smell" less obvious and also reduces taste.
I don't really like meat either and never have. The smell of most of it is awful.

Posted on: Tue, 02/14/2006 - 2:05am
becca's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

I make homemade popcorn chicken and the kids gobble it up. My dd is very sqeamish about meat, and she will eat a pound(well, alot) of these.
I use little pieces of chicken breast, basically diced into bite sized bits.
Dip it in milk(use egg if not allergic, but we are), then in a combo of corn meal and bread crumbs. Corn meal gives a great crunch. Season the crumbs as desired. I have found the kids like just salt and a touch of sugar in it. I might brine the chicken sometimes.
Fry in olive oil. So, it is fried, but in healthy fat, and I have skinny kids. Trouble is dh and I love em too! becca
[This message has been edited by becca (edited February 14, 2006).]

Posted on: Tue, 02/14/2006 - 5:30am
Edinview's picture
Offline
Joined: 08/25/2003 - 09:00

If you want to try to add ground meat to the pasta sauce try this method that I just saw on a tv cooking show. Of course the method has been around forever, but I just saw it and tried it and found that the ground beef in my sauce was really tender.
The trick is that you don't brown the beef before adding the sauce, you put the beef into a pan, then add about 3/4 cups of milk to the pan and kind of boil the beef in the milk. Keep stirring as the whole thing heats so that the beef breaks apart.
I remember my son wouldn't eat anything like meat because it was so tough and dry, it would dry out as he chewed and chewed on it. So we tried cooking methods that yielded moist, tender meat such as braising, or using meat with more fat. KFC seemed to go down pretty well and we had many a chicken breast from there, just the meat part, not the skin.

Posted on: Tue, 02/14/2006 - 10:21am
krasota's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/24/2000 - 09:00

Are you okay with legumes? Add lentils and beans and peas to any pasta dish you make. Peas go great in mac & cheese. Lentils are yummy in spaghetti. White beans go well with pasta, rice, and greens.
How about quinoa? It's tasty and nutritious. You can mix it with rice and beans for a hearty main dish.
ygg

Posted on: Tue, 02/14/2006 - 10:41am
dgood's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/27/2004 - 09:00

Edinview, that is interesting how you cooked the beef. I want to try that! My kids are ok with beef sometimes but not consistently. How long did you simmer it in the milk?

Posted on: Wed, 02/15/2006 - 8:57pm
anonymous's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Here's what I do for my 22 month old who is not a chewer (he's my 2nd "gagger")
I buy really premium ground meat, put it in a heavy saucepan and add water while stirring until it reaches the consistency of oatmeal (raw meat seen this way makes ME gag...) Then I put it over medium heat and stir it constantly until no longer pink. Shut it off, cool a bit, and pour meat and broth into dedicated icecube trays, cover with plastic and freeze. When frozen, unmold into freezer ziplocs.
These "meat cubes" will thaw in the microwave and can be mixed into just about anything: sauce, noodles, even oatmeal with steamed, chopped veggies.
You can do this with ground beef, turkey, or chicken.
Nice because no matter what the rest of the family is eating you'll always have some toddler protein in the freezer that takes 30 seconds to thaw!
Amy

Posted on: Wed, 02/15/2006 - 10:10pm
anonymous's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

If you eat legumes, there are a lot of options: black beans in a tortilla (my kids like corn mixed with it), refried beans in taco shells (espec. good ith guacamole, and then you get a veg., too!), lentils, kidney beans, falafel (that's chick pea), etc. There's also couscous and quinoa. There are so many soy products out there: veggie burgers, veggie hot dogs, tofu mixed into stir fry or pasta sauce, etc. For lunch, I eat a lot of pita and hummus, slices of vegetarian lunch meats, yogurt with granola in it. I'm sure I am forgetting things, but that's a start.

Posted on: Thu, 02/16/2006 - 12:10am
cgroth's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/25/2006 - 09:00

I am having a similar problem. My dd is 13 months and doesn't want to eat anything! Part of it is my fault. I knew she was going to have allergies & was afraid to give her table food. She is still eating lots of baby food veggies & fruit. I have tried fresh fruit & pasta but she spits it out. Sometimes she will eat little pieces of chicken, toast, dried fruit and of course cookies that I make. She is allergic to dariy, peanuts, egg, soy, corn & pork so we are VERY limited as to what she can eat! Any ideas? I would really like to get her off the baby food but she know's if she cries during meal time after refusing what I give her, I'll get it out.

Posted on: Thu, 02/16/2006 - 2:53am
toomanynuts's picture
Offline
Joined: 08/23/2003 - 09:00

I would stick with the baby food and add the table foods as she is ready. As long as she getting what she needs she will be okay. I wouldn't hurry anything just go with her timing. Alot has to do with texture and taste and will happen but you don't have to rush the table foods. If the idea of buying baby much longer isn't a good idea you can just make it yourself with one of those baby grinders, that way you could make it fresh each time.
toomanynuts

Posted on: Thu, 02/16/2006 - 5:43am
cgroth's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/25/2006 - 09:00

toomanynuts - thanks for the advice. When my older daughter was this age, she was eating what we ate, just smaller pieces. She has no allergies so it wasn't a big deal finding things for her. I guess I just need to relax & let dd set the pace. I should get a grinder & try to grind up some things so she can have a variety. Thanks!

Posted on: Fri, 02/17/2006 - 1:31pm
Lori Jo's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/17/2003 - 09:00

Cgroth,
My twins were eating table food by 9-10 months (small bits, gummable, but definitely not just baby food.) They also both decided around 6 months they no longer wanted to nurse. Their younger sister wanted nothing to do with anything but nursing until she was 14 months, and almost overnite went to table food. She pretty much skipped babyfood altogether. Every kid is different. As long as yours is growing, I wouldn't worry about it. Though it is a pain making separate "baby" dinners. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
Lori Jo,
Rose, 7-31-02, PA
Beatrice & Georgia, 8-14-99

Posted on: Fri, 02/17/2006 - 9:23pm
pixiegirl's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/11/2005 - 09:00

Ah don't worry about it, kids change what they eat all the time... my daughter lived on mac and cheese for about 6 months. We went thru the no veggies at all stage.
There are so many other sources of protein that I'd not worry about it. I never once made food an issue in our home, there were no rules like: you have to sit at the table until you finish your XXXXXXXX. Or you can't have dessert until you eat your XXXX. Eating is supposed to be enjoyable, relaxing and family time and life is so stressful I refuse to have our meal times that way too.
My mother kept telling me that my daughter would grow up not liking a wide variety of foods. Well sorry mom, you were wrong about that. She is now 14 and eats almost anything... her friends think she is nuts for liking, things like artichoke, broccoli, cabbage, avocado, fish, etc.... most of her friends live on pizza but her father and I love food and just continued to eat a wide variety of healthy foods and she'd eventually try them.
Susan

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